Nutcase Former New Haven Connecticut Police Officer John Kelly, Facing Weapons Charge, Arrested Again And Charged With Burglary And Larceny After Stealing Generator From Man’s Garage

July 2, 2012

MIDDLETOWN, CONNECTICUT — A former New Haven police officer recently arrested on a weapons charge was arrested again over the weekend and charged with burglary and larceny for allegedly stealing a generator, state police report.

John Kelly, 45, 1 Brookside Ave., Old Lyme, was in Middletown Superior Court on Monday and Judge Susan Handy set bond for $25,000 cash or surety, which he posted through a bail bondsman. According to court personnel, Kelly will be held on a suicide watch and is due back in court July 20.

State police responded to call of an accident on June 23 around 10:45 a.m. and found a pickup truck in the middle of the travel lane on New City Street in Essex. The truck came back as registered to Kelly, and the trooper found him a short time later, walking back to the truck.

Kelly told police he had run out of gas and was pouring gas from a Dunkin’ Donuts cup into the truck, police said. He was disheveled and dirty, wearing one shoe and hobbling around, stating he had sprained his ankle, police said.

Kelly was able to start the truck and told police he was going home. Less than two hours later, troopers responded to a call from Kelly’s ex wife, saying Kelly was on Dennison Road limping and “acting strange.”

Troopers reported seeing the truck in the roadway again, and Kelly, “sweating profusely” said he was out of gas again, according to police. While waiting for a tow truck to arrive for Kelly, police were approached by a man who said he lived on the road and said he found a cup of water in his garage.

Police asked Kelly if he had been in the man’s house, and Kelly allegedly said he went into the garage for water and gas. Kelly had a newer Honda generator in the bed of his truck and the man identified it as his generator, police said. Kelly, however, told police he had found it in the bushes behind the man’s house and had tried to get gas from it, then placed it in the back of his truck. After investigating, police determined the generator had been in the back of the man’s garage.

When police arrested Kelly, he became irate and yelled “cops are supposed to take care of each other,” police said, and that “the state police were out to get him.” He tried to minimalize the incident by saying he had only gone into the garage a few feet, police said.

Kelly, who was a New Haven police officer for 21 years and has also served in the U.S. Navy, said he had a stellar career as a police officer in New Haven, according to state police. According to statements made in court, Kelly suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

While in the cell at the state police barracks, Kelly was yelling, banging on the cell doors and walls, and covering himself in water from the sink, police said. He was unable to post the $5,000 bond and was taken to Hartford Correctional until his arraignment Monday.

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Shreveport Louisiana Police Officer Kevin Perry Arrested, Suspended, And Charged With Theft Of Drugs And Abuse Of Office

June 29, 2012

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA – Shreveport Police officials have charged a Shreveport officer in connection with a criminal complaint received by the department.

Shreveport Police Department Sgt. Bill Goodin says investigators received information in mid-March that a police officer was possibly involved in the theft of some prescription medication. The offense allegedly occurred while the officer was working an off-duty job at Broadmoor Middle Laboratory School. Detective supervisors were immediately notified and commenced an investigation into the allegations.

Based on evidence gathered during the course of their inquiry, investigators obtained arrest warrants Friday afternoon charging 44-year-old Kevin Perry with misdemeanor theft and abuse of office in office. Perry surrendered himself to authorities at the Caddo Correctional Center and was booked in on those charges.

Perry joined the Shreveport Police Department in November of 1990. He has been on paid administrative leave since March 22nd and will remain as such for seven days following his arrest, as required by the rules and regulations of the Shreveport Municipal Fire and Police Civil Service Board.

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Dumbass Davenport Iowa Officals Send Notice To Wrong Address, Sends City Workers To Remove Couple’s Religious Items From Private Property, And Now City Has To Pay To Replace Items

June 27, 2012

DAVENPORT, IOWA – Mack Covey and his wife Merla were surprised one morning to find strangers in their backyard, taking things without notice, with not even a knock on the front door.

“Bottom line my freedom of religion was violated big time,” Covey says, “The door to the teepee was taken and the buffalo robe.”

“That was my teepee, which was an actual church,” he says of the items’ importance, “We’ve had ceremony here in it.”

Other non-religious items like umbrellas and cleaning poles were also taken, in total about $2300 worth of things Covey wants back.

“I just want what’s fair,” Covey says, “The monetary means to replace the items they blatantly stole. We weren’t notified, bottom line.”

TV6 spoke with Alderman Bill Boom today who says a notice was sent, but to the wrong address. He tell us the city was notified when a neighbor complained, citing items in the backyard, both religious and non-religious, as an environmental hazard. The city sent workers in to clean up what they call ‘debris,’ but Covey disagrees.

“It’d be like me going into one of the churches here in town and taking a cross,” he says, “That’s how much significance it has to me.”

The couple and their supporters have contacted public works and city aldermen, who have come to sort out the issue at the couple’s home. Officials say they’re working on a resolution.

“The workers I’m sure did not know what they took,” Covey says, “This is as important as life and death itself.”

An attorney for the city tells us the yard is in violation of an environmental ordinance that says residents have to keep your lawns clean and clear of debris. City officials say they’ve apologized to the couple and they’re in the process of paying them back so they can replace the items gone.

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Veteran New Jersey State Police Trooper Staff Sgt. Steven M. Jones Stole Thousands Of Dollars Worth Of Gasoline From State Fuel Pumps – Gets Sweet Retirement Deal With Pension That Doesn’t Include Prison Time

June 26, 2012

TRENTON, NEW JERSEY — For more than three years, a veteran State Police trooper stole thousands of dollars worth of gasoline from state fuel pumps for his personal vehicles without being detected — and when authorities did catch on, he was not charged criminally and was allowed to retire with pension.

Disciplinary records obtained by The Star-Ledger show Staff Sgt. Steven M. Jones admitted in April that he stole 3,128 gallons of gas valued at $7,038 from October 2007 to March 2011. The 25-year trooper then retired under a negotiated plea agreement with internal affairs.

At the same time that Jones was fueling up on the taxpayers’ dime, a government watchdog warned the State Police it was not doing enough to track gas use by troopers.

“There are documented cases where abuses have been discovered,” the Office of the State Auditor said in a 2008 report. “However, systematic monitoring is not performed.”

The findings echoed the auditor’s concerns raised a year earlier about weaknesses in how the state monitors fuel fill-ups for its entire fleet — a system overseen by the state Treasury Department, which at the time vowed to make improvements.

Five years later, the state has yet to award a contract that would enact safeguards to curtail state troopers and other employees from stealing gas.

“Until all safeguards are in place, there remains a risk of abuse,” said Peter McAleer, spokesman for the state Comptroller’s Office, which documented weak oversight over vehicles used by the Department of Children and Families in 2009.

The Treasury Department said it is now reviewing contract proposals for a new system to monitor fill-ups through real-time reporting of details such as who requested the gas and how much was pumped. Officials would not say if there is a timetable for awarding a contract.

“These types of things, particularly high-tech systems like this, tend to take awhile to actually get the contract in place,” a spokesman for Treasury, Bill Quinn, said.

In the case of trooper Jones, a spokesman for the State Police, Acting Sgt. 1st Class Brian Polite, said the incident focused on the “inappropriate actions of one individual.”

“A thorough internal investigation was conducted and appropriate disciplinary actions were taken,” Polite said.

He did not respond to questions about how the theft went on for years without being detected, how Jones was caught or what is done to monitor gas use.

Jones was suspended without pay in March for about two weeks before retiring under the plea agreement with internal affairs. Records show he forfeited his accrued personal, holiday and vacation time, which was worth roughly the same amount that he stole in gas. He is also barred from holding another law enforcement job in New Jersey and from obtaining a gun permit for retired officers, records show.

The State Police Retirement Board last month reduced Jones’ pension from 65 percent of his final salary to 50 percent because of the theft and also revoked his medical benefits. Last year, Jones earned a regular salary of about $105,000, not including overtime and other pay, according to state payroll records.

During the board’s hearing, Jones, 47, said he was a recovering alcoholic but did not always follow his treatment routine during the time he stole the gas. He also said he worked a large amount of overtime but could not overcome his debt, which led to his actions.

“Sometimes I do things I don’t normally do,” Jones said. He did not return a phone call seeking further comment.
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Jones was not charged criminally, and case law prevents a police officer’s admission during an administrative review to be the basis for subsequent criminal charges. A spokesman for the Attorney General’s Office, Paul Loriquet, declined to comment specifically about the case.

“If we have sufficient proof that a law enforcement officer has committed a crime, we’ll prosecute that officer, as we would any other individual that committed a crime,” Loriquet said.

A source familiar with the case said it was reviewed by prosecutors at the Attorney General’s Office and there was not enough evidence to bring charges. The source was not allowed to discuss criminal investigations and requested anonymity.

The state Auditor’s report in 2008 noted the weak protections of the State Police’s fueling system. Most gas cards are assigned to individual patrol cars, though some are “transient” cards that can be used by any trooper at a particular barracks.

Three sources with knowledge of the State Police’s fueling system said it relies largely on the honor system and not every fueling yard has cameras to deter abuse. The sources requested anonymity because they were not allowed to speak with the media.

In addition, though fuel pumps ask for a badge number after a card is swiped, a trooper can enter anyone’s badge number and get gas. The auditor’s report said that makes tracking individual usage difficult.

“Having a more secure identification number associated with each transaction would make monitoring more effective,” the report said.

In its review of the state’s entire fuel monitoring system in 2007, the auditor noted there were multiple fill-ups on the same day, fill-ups exceeding fuel tank capacities and inconsistent mileage tracking.

The state has in the past charged public employees for stealing gas.

In 2008, the Attorney General’s Office charged a dozen public employees, including six with ties to the Department of Children and Families, in connection with stealing about 1,400 gallons of gas for their personal vehicles from government-run pumps.

In response to the arrests, the Comptroller’s Office reviewed the department and found hundreds of questionable fuel transactions and weak oversight. McAleer, the spokesman for the office, said the department has since made substantial improvements.

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Suspended North Providence Rhode Island Police Chief John J. Whiting Claims He Didn’t Steal Stripper’s Cash

June 26, 2012

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND – A suspended Rhode Island police chief testified at his trial Monday that he did not steal $714 from a stripper’s pocketbook after chasing a SUV in which she was riding during Tropical Storm Irene.

Testifying in his own defense, North Providence police Col. John J. Whiting gave a vastly different account of his exchange with a Pawtucket police officer who was investigating the Aug. 28 vehicle chase and foot pursuit in Pawtucket that involved the police chief.

Whiting, 58, of North Attleboro, has pleaded not guilty to larceny over $500 and solicitation to receive stolen property. Providence County Superior Court Judge Daniel A. Procaccini dismissed a charge against him of criminal solicitation to obstruct justice. Whiting’s case is being decided by a judge instead of by a jury.

Pawtucket Officer John Brown testified last week that Whiting confessed to stealing the money. Brown said Whiting gave him the money with instructions to spend it in Las Vegas and not say anything about it.

Whiting testified he told Brown to take the money as seized evidence and was being sarcastic when he told him: “I don’t give a (expletive) if you go to Vegas.”

Giving his first public account of the events, Whiting described getting into a pursuit with a Ford Explorer while driving through Pawtucket on his way to work in North Providence. He said the SUV was trying to get around a downed tree when he tried to pass the vehicle, and someone instead threw an object at his SUV.

Whiting testified he then chased the vehicle until it turned down a dead-end street and struck a parked car.

The Explorer’s occupants ran away from the crash site, Whiting testified. Among them was 21-year-old Justina Cardoso, a former stripper who testified she left behind all her belongings, including her money.

Whiting said he went through the SUV looking for evidence that might indicate who was in the vehicle. He said he found money inside a zippered pouch that he took because no Pawtucket police had shown up yet.

During cross examination, Whiting testified he made a “conscious decision” to turn over the money to Brown, the Pawtucket officer who reported to the scene, at the conclusion of the investigation on the dead-end street where the chase ended.

“I had no intention of stealing the money. I didn’t steal the money,” Whiting said.

He added he did not have time during the investigation to tell Brown that he had the money.

“I have $714. How long does that take,” Assistant Attorney General Mark Trovato asked.

Before Brown left the crash scene to finish his work at the Pawtucket police station, Whiting testified that he asked Brown to meet him at a nearby parking lot.

“I was going to give him the money at that time and answer any other questions about the accident,” Whiting said.

When they arrived at the parking lot, Whiting testified he and Brown made small talk. Whiting, who served on the Pawtucket police force for nearly 30 years before becoming the North Providence police chief, is an acquaintance of Brown, who has been a Pawtucket police officer for 24 years.

Eventually, Whiting testified, Brown said he was going to the site where Whiting tried to pass the Explorer to look for the bottle that the police chief thought was thrown at his vehicle, and Whiting accompanies him.

Whiting said he then turned over the money to Brown, who asked: “What did you steal it or something?”

Whiting said he angrily told him no and that he’s “never stolen anything in my … life.”

Whiting also testified that Brown was mumbling and hesitant to take the money from him. He said he was having trouble understanding what Brown was saying to him.

Whiting acknowledged he failed to count out the money he was turning over to Brown. Still, he said he expected Brown to submit it as seized evidence.

“I admit I made a mistake by not counting out the money in front of him. That’s the only mistake I made,” Whiting said.

He is expected to continue his testimony on Tuesday.

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Richfield Ohio Police Officer Robert Gilbert And Anthony Riviotta Fired For Stealing Fence – Both Plead Guilty And Get Diversion Program That Makes Charges Go Away

June 25, 2012

RICHFIELD, OHIO — Two Richfield police officers were fired Friday after Akron Municipal Court dismissed charges of stealing fencing that had fallen off a truck on Interstate 271.

Robert Gilbert and Anthony Riviotta were suspended Nov. 28. The officers pleaded guilty in court and were ordered to complete a diversion program for first-time, nonviolent offenders.

In return for completing the program, the criminal charges against the two were dismissed last week, but Gilbert and Riviotta still faced disciplinary action from the police department.

After a hearing, police Chief Keith Morgan decided to fire the men.

“There were department charges filed against both officers,” said Morgan. “After reviewing the case and the internal investigation we found that the charges had merit.”

Morgan said that Riviotta was found guilty of six charges of theft and Gilbert was found guilty of nine out of 10 charges.

Prior to being terminated, Gilbert, was placed on paid leave, as required because he is a full-time officer. Riviotta, a part-time officer, was placed on unpaid leave.

The two men were off duty Oct. 11 when a strap broke off of a tractor-trailer, causing a roll of fencing to tumble onto the highway. Gilbert, who ticketed the driver for not properly securing the fencing, and Riviotta arrived on the scene in their personal cars.

Days after the incident, the truck driver questioned authorities about what happened to the fencing. It eventually was returned.

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West York Borough Pennsylvania Police Officer Bridgette M. Wilson Wants Trial For Illegally Taping Conversations With Her Lesbian Lover – Also Charged With Receiving Stolen Property (Police Equipment) Elsewhere

June 22, 2012

YORK, PENNSYLVANIA – A West York Borough Police officer accused of illegally taping conversations with her domestic partner without the woman’s knowledge has withdrawn her petition for a pre-trial disposition.

Officer Bridgette M. Wilson, 42, who has been suspended without pay since March 2011, had been accepted into the York County District Attorney’s Accelerated Rehabilitative Disposition program for her charges of intercepting communications, third-degree felonies.

Wilson allegedly made the illegal recordings in December 2010 and January 2011.

At her ARD hearing Friday, Wilson withdrew her petition and opted to go to trial, which now is scheduled for July 8 in York County court.

Her attorney, Korey Leslie, said Friday he was left “with the impression” she did not want to comply with the requirements of ARD. The program typically includes a supervision fee, community service, possibly some counseling, and the directive not to commit any other crimes.

Successful completion of ARD can result in the criminal charges being expunged from public records.

“The only thing she told me was she thinks she doesn’t need to do ARD,” Leslie said.

Wilson, of Mountville, also is charged with receiving stolen property in Lancaster County.

Manor Township Police seized a walkie-talkie and “other police related items” belonging to the Susquehanna Township Police Department inside Wilson’s home in March 2011. Wilson had worked as an officer for Susquehanna Township Police, leaving the department in December 2007.

No date is set for her Lancaster trial.

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