Glynn County Georgia And Carter County Tennessee Sheriff’s Department Piss Away Tax Dollars In Attempt To Serve 80 Year Old Warrant

February 28, 2009

ELIZABETHTON, TENNESSEE – The Carter County Sheriff’s Department is trying to serve an 80-year-old warrant for the arrest of a man who wrote a $30 bad check, although unsure if he is alive. The warrant, issued in August 1928, calls for the arrest of J.A. Rowland. It says he owes $30 for the bad check, $2 for the arrest fee and 50 cents each for the affidavit and warrant.

Clerks at the Glynn County Sheriff’s Office in Brunswick, Ga., recently found the warrant buried in a records storage room while cleaning and mailed it to Tennessee.

Current Carter County Sheriff Chris Mathes told The Elizabethton Star he is still under a legal obligation to find Rowland.

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Crazed Central Connecticut State University Police Investigate Student Who Avocated Carrying Guns On Campus In Oral Presentation

February 28, 2009

CRAZY IN CONNECTICUT – For CCSU student John Wahlberg, a class presentation on campus violence turned into a confrontation with the campus police due to a complaint by the professor.

On October 3, 2008, Wahlberg and two other classmates prepared to give an oral presentation for a Communication 140 class that was required to discuss a “relevant issue in the media”. Wahlberg and his group chose to discuss school violence due to recent events such as the Virginia Tech shootings that occurred in 2007.

Shortly after his professor, Paula Anderson, filed a complaint with the CCSU Police against her student. During the presentation Wahlberg made the point that if students were permitted to conceal carry guns on campus, the violence could have been stopped earlier in many of these cases. He also touched on the controversial idea of free gun zones on college campuses.

That night at work, Wahlberg received a message stating that the campus police “requested his presence”. Upon entering the police station, the officers began to list off firearms that were registered under his name, and questioned him about where he kept them.

They told Wahlberg that they had received a complaint from his professor that his presentation was making students feel “scared and uncomfortable”.

“I was a bit nervous when I walked into the police station,” Wahlberg said, “but I felt a general sense of disbelief once the officer actually began to list the firearms registered in my name. I was never worried however, because as a law-abiding gun owner, I have a thorough understanding of state gun laws as well as unwavering safety practices.”

Professor Anderson refused to comment directly on the situation and deferred further comment.

“It is also my responsibility as a teacher to protect the well being of our students, and the campus community at all times,” she wrote in a statement submitted to The Recorder. “As such, when deemed necessary because of any perceived risks, I seek guidance and consultation from the Chair of my Department, the Dean and any relevant University officials.”

Wahlberg believes that her complaint was filed without good reason.

“I don’t think that Professor Anderson was justified in calling the CCSU police over a clearly nonthreatening matter. Although the topic of discussion may have made a few individuals uncomfortable, there was no need to label me as a threat,” Wahlberg said in response. “The actions of Professor Anderson made me so uncomfortable, that I didn’t attend several classes. The only appropriate action taken by the Professor was to excuse my absences.”

The university police were unavailable for comment.

“If you can’t talk about the Second Amendment, what happened to the First Amendment?” asked Sara Adler, president of the Riflery and Marksmanship club on campus. “After all, a university campus is a place for the free and open exchange of ideas.”

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Glynn County Georgia And Carter County Tennessee Sheriff’s Department Piss Away Tax Dollars In Attempt To Serve 80 Year Old Warrant

February 28, 2009

ELIZABETHTON, TENNESSEE – The Carter County Sheriff’s Department is trying to serve an 80-year-old warrant for the arrest of a man who wrote a $30 bad check, although unsure if he is alive. The warrant, issued in August 1928, calls for the arrest of J.A. Rowland. It says he owes $30 for the bad check, $2 for the arrest fee and 50 cents each for the affidavit and warrant.

Clerks at the Glynn County Sheriff’s Office in Brunswick, Ga., recently found the warrant buried in a records storage room while cleaning and mailed it to Tennessee.

Current Carter County Sheriff Chris Mathes told The Elizabethton Star he is still under a legal obligation to find Rowland.

Appeared Here


Crazed Central Connecticut State University Police Investigate Student Who Avocated Carrying Guns On Campus In Oral Presentation

February 28, 2009

CRAZY IN CONNECTICUT – For CCSU student John Wahlberg, a class presentation on campus violence turned into a confrontation with the campus police due to a complaint by the professor.

On October 3, 2008, Wahlberg and two other classmates prepared to give an oral presentation for a Communication 140 class that was required to discuss a “relevant issue in the media”. Wahlberg and his group chose to discuss school violence due to recent events such as the Virginia Tech shootings that occurred in 2007.

Shortly after his professor, Paula Anderson, filed a complaint with the CCSU Police against her student. During the presentation Wahlberg made the point that if students were permitted to conceal carry guns on campus, the violence could have been stopped earlier in many of these cases. He also touched on the controversial idea of free gun zones on college campuses.

That night at work, Wahlberg received a message stating that the campus police “requested his presence”. Upon entering the police station, the officers began to list off firearms that were registered under his name, and questioned him about where he kept them.

They told Wahlberg that they had received a complaint from his professor that his presentation was making students feel “scared and uncomfortable”.

“I was a bit nervous when I walked into the police station,” Wahlberg said, “but I felt a general sense of disbelief once the officer actually began to list the firearms registered in my name. I was never worried however, because as a law-abiding gun owner, I have a thorough understanding of state gun laws as well as unwavering safety practices.”

Professor Anderson refused to comment directly on the situation and deferred further comment.

“It is also my responsibility as a teacher to protect the well being of our students, and the campus community at all times,” she wrote in a statement submitted to The Recorder. “As such, when deemed necessary because of any perceived risks, I seek guidance and consultation from the Chair of my Department, the Dean and any relevant University officials.”

Wahlberg believes that her complaint was filed without good reason.

“I don’t think that Professor Anderson was justified in calling the CCSU police over a clearly nonthreatening matter. Although the topic of discussion may have made a few individuals uncomfortable, there was no need to label me as a threat,” Wahlberg said in response. “The actions of Professor Anderson made me so uncomfortable, that I didn’t attend several classes. The only appropriate action taken by the Professor was to excuse my absences.”

The university police were unavailable for comment.

“If you can’t talk about the Second Amendment, what happened to the First Amendment?” asked Sara Adler, president of the Riflery and Marksmanship club on campus. “After all, a university campus is a place for the free and open exchange of ideas.”

Appeared Here


Hamilton County Ohio Morgue Attendant Had Sex With Corpses – Possibly Over A Hundred

February 27, 2009

HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO – On many nights over 16 years, Kenneth Douglas engaged in his own personal macabre workplace party.

He often brought drugs or alcohol to work and sometimes had sex with women.

At least three of those women were dead, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters said Thursday.

But if Douglas is to be believed, he could have had sex with as many as “over a hundred” bodies in the 16 years he worked as night attendant at the Hamilton County morgue.

“I am sure there are more (victims). I’m certain of it,” Deters said Thursday in announcing new indictments against Douglas.

“This guy’s just a pig. I can’t explain why someone would do something like this. … This is off-the-charts weird.”

Douglas, 55, of Westwood, already is serving a prison sentence after he pleaded guilty last year to abuse of a corpse. He admitted he had sex with the nearly beheaded body of 19-year-old murder victim Karen Range in 1982.

Thursday, Douglas was indicted on two more counts of abuse of a corpse after DNA evidence, Deters said, showed Douglas’ semen was in the bodies of two women who were killed in 1991 and stored at the morgue awaiting autopsies:

Charlene Edwards, also known as Charlene Apling, who was six months pregnant.

She was strangled to death Oct. 1, 1991, by Mark Chambers, now 47, in Chambers’ Avondale home. Chambers originally was charged with murder but accepted a plea bargain and was convicted of voluntary manslaughter and sent to prison for 10-25 years. He was paroled in 2000.

Angel Hicks, 24, of Westwood.

Tyrone Williams, 59, was charged with murder in the December 1991 death of Hicks. He was acquitted months later at trial. There was a question whether Hicks was killed or committed suicide.

Deters said he was stunned by so many aspects of the case: sex with a corpse, sex with violently mutilated or damaged bodies, sex with dozens of bodies.

“Frankly, it’s frightening. His numbers when he’s (talked to authorities) go from one to three or four to ‘a lot’ to maybe over a hundred,” Deters said, quoting Douglas. “I think it’s fair to speculate that he’s been doing this all the time, when he’s able and had the opportunity.”

After Douglas admitted abusing Range’s corpse last year, prosecutors said they suspected there were other victims. They called area law enforcement agencies asking for cases to investigate.

That evidence was mostly vaginal swabs taken from the bodies during autopsies.

Officials came up with 15 cases they believe could have involved Douglas. DNA could be found on 12 of them. Of those, two showed the semen belonged to Douglas.

“We’ll never know” how many victims there are, Deters said, “because (Douglas) doesn’t know. We probably won’t (ever) know the scope of his abuse.”

“It doesn’t surprise me there are other victims. What’s surprising is we were able to demonstrate it,” Deters said. Eighteen years ago DNA was in its infancy as an investigative tool.

Deters’ office contacted the family members of Edwards and Hicks to tell them of the new accusations against Douglas.

“It’s fair to say they were devastated by this news,” Deters said. “I feel badly for the families who are never going to know.”

Douglas, Deters added, told officials he remembered having sex with Range but didn’t recall Edwards or Hicks.

“No one ever saw this man do anything,” Deters said.

The closest, he believes, was an incident in which an assistant coroner tried to get into a room with bodies and found it locked. A few minutes after the doctor knocked, Deters said, “Douglas walked out.”

Deters supports a pending bill that increases the crime of abuse of a corpse – specifically having sex with a corpse – from one year in prison to five years in prison.

The crime at the time of the alleged 1991 incidents called for a maximum prison sentence of 18 months. That means the charges filed against Douglas on Thursday carry a maximum prison sentence of three years.

Douglas was caught when he violated his probation on a previous conviction, and his DNA was taken by officials and placed in a database. The database showed Douglas’ DNA matched that of the semen left in Range’s body.

“I hope,” Deters said, “I never see anybody like Kenneth Douglas again.”

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High Tech UK Police Helicopter And Raid Uncovers Wood Burning Stove – No-Brain Cops Zeroed In On "Heat Source" In A Home

February 27, 2009

Huddersfield, West Yorkshire – When an infra-red camera on the police helicopter identified a suspicious heat pattern coming from Colin Rowe’s workshop, officers were convinced it was the site of a cannabis factory.

They obtained the necessary search warrant and forced the door to raid the property while the owner was out.

But instead of finding an illicit drugs operation, the officers discovered nothing more sinister than a wood-burning stove.

Upset: Colin Rowe with the door police smashed, left, and the workshop stove, which, as a heat source, led police to believe Mr Rowe was growing cannabis

The heat source police regarded as highly suspicious was simply a stove used to warm the garage workshop where Mr Rowe restores cars in his spare time.

Not surprisingly Mr Rowe was furious when he returned home to find the damaged door and the warrant, which had been posted through his letterbox without an apology.

‘I find it quite disturbing that Wild West Yorkshire Police can do what they want. I think it is disgraceful, I didn’t think the police would treat anyone like this without good reason,’ he said.

‘My dad was a police officer for 40 years and he’s disgusted about this.’

College technician Mr Rowe, 41, who has no previous convictions, added:’I think it’s a pretty poor way for them to behave given that I’m not the sort of person who’s known to the police.’

Commenting on the damage, he said:’There was a big hole in the door which was large enough to get your arm through, the hinges were bent, there were bits of wood on the floor and one of my plant pots was broken.

‘There was a brush and shovel right by the door so, if they’d had any compassion, they would have at least swept up the mess.’

Mr Rowe went to his local police station in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, to complain and spoke to the policewoman who applied for the warrant. She said a police helicopter ‘had noted the heat source from my home.’

It appears Mr Rowe’s sensible crime prevention measures may have also heightened the police’s suspicions.

‘She said they sent a patrol to my house and found I had bars on the windows at the back. That’s to prevent burglary – I don’t think it’s excessive.

‘I’ve been given a form to claim compensation and I hope the police will pay for the damage.’

A West Yorkshire Police spokesman confirmed officers executed a drugs warrant at 9.45 am last Friday. ‘During the execution of the warrant a door to an external building was forced. Officers located no drugs and arrangements were made for the door to be left secure.

‘No entry was made by officers into the main house itself. It is standard policy that we will pay for repairs in such circumstances and we would be happy to discuss any concerns Mr Rowe has.’

Mr Rowe shares the house with wife Beth, a 40-year-old health visitor. The door has cost £200 to repair and he has had to take time off work because of the police raid.

He said he had taken a car restoration course and enjoyed doing DIY jobs in the workshop at the back of the garage. Mr Rowe said police sent to investigate his premises claimed they could smell cannabis at the back.

They were also suspicious that he had bars on the windows, which were painted so no one could see inside.

‘That’s because I have expensive tools in there and it’s a sensible crime prevention measure,’ he said.

‘I was astonished they carried out this raid, I don’t see how they had sufficient evidence to get a search warrant.’

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UK Paramedic Fired After Refusing To Interrupt His Lunch Break To Help A Man With A Broken Back

February 27, 2009

LEWES, EAST SUSSEX – A paramedic who refused to help a man with a broken back because he was on his lunch break escaped any punishment yesterday.

Robert Chambers was found guilty of misconduct by the Health Professions Council.

Tribunal chairman Colin Allies said: ‘This was a big professional mistake but he has shown insight into his behaviour.

‘We are satisfied that his fitness to practice is not impaired.’

Chambers, who had admitted a lack of competence, was filling up his ambulance at a petrol station in Lewes, East Sussex, when he was approached by the injured man’s friends on Boxing Day in 2006.

The patient had been on a Boxing Day fox hunt when he injured his back in a Land Rover. His friends had tried to get him out the car but he was in such pain it was impossible to move him.

When asked to help, Chambers said: ‘Sorry – I’m off duty.’

The man remained in agony for 40 minutes as he waited for another ambulance to come from 15 miles away. He had to be given morphine- which Chambers had in his vehicle.

The patient had fractured a vertebrae and was off work for three months.

A paramedic for 18 years, Chambers told South East Ambulance Service bosses at an internal hearing he ‘felt he could ignore’ the request as he was on a break.

But he told the tribunal it was the ‘biggest cock-up of my life’.

‘I should have gone to see the patient. It doesn’t sit comfortably with me,’ he said.

Chris Ford, a project manager for South East Ambulance Service told the hearing: ‘It’s generally understood that if a paramedic is approached by a member of the public, even if he is doing something different, it’s incumbent on him to respond to that incident. If he happens to be at the incident, then it’s appropriate to respond.’

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