Connecticut’s High Tech Plan To Track Sex Offenders Crashes And Burns At Taxpayer Expense

April 30, 2009

CONNECTICUT – Tracking bracelets were supposed to make Southbury residents feel safe. Instead, they are sending the wrong signal – maybe even no signal at all.

In September, the GPS tracking system came under fire when the ankle bracelet worn by David Pollitt, a convicted serial rapist, malfunctioned. Residents who live in Pollitt’s Southbury neighborhood say the bracelets can’t be trusted.

“I don’t feel comfortable with it. It’s not reliable,” Cathy Baisch of Southbury said.

“There are so many cloaking devices and ways to run interference, not to mention the problems with the device’s construction,” said Matt Devan of Prospect.

In the state, 81 sex offenders are equipped with GPS monitoring bracelets like Pollitt’s. Neither the state, nor the company that makes them keeps count of the number of times they malfunction.

The executive director of administrative services for the judicial branch said the technology does “glitch” from time to time.

“Frankly, most of them are false alarms, things like low battery, GPS unit out of position, things like that,” said Thomas Siconolfi.

Earlier this month, New Haven police spent hours searching the Long Island Sound after a jogger found an electronic monitoring bracelet floating in the water. Police said the parolee it belonged to was never found.

Siconolfi said the bracelets use tamper-resistant technology, but will not alarm if the offender is in a dead zone.

Another problem the state is dealing with is response time. Siconolfi said it takes an average of 15 to 20 minutes for police to respond to any GPS alerts — and that’s only if the bracelet has a cell signal to communicate the violation. Some lawmakers are outraged.

“It’s absolutely too much time, because by the time the system responds to the violation of this type, the damage has been done and people have been hurt for life,” Rep. Demetrious Giannaros said.

There’s also concern when it comes to monitoring the offenders. Right now, there are no probation officers on the clock on weekends, meaning a call from the vendor to police reporting an alert could go answered.

“This is the first I’m hearing about this. It’s totally unacceptable,” Giannaros said.

Those in charge of the program wanted to fix the problem by opening a monitoring center here in Connecticut.

Right now, most offenders are monitored by employees in Florida. It carried a price tag of $400,000 and at last check, was put on hold indefinitely.

Appeared Here


Faggot Olmsted Township Police Chief Charles McNeeley Arrested During Park Masturbation/Sex Incident

April 30, 2009

CLEVELAND, OHIO – Olmsted Township Police Chief Charles McNeeley was charged with indecent exposure after being arrested with another man Tuesday morning in the Cleveland Metroparks, rangers said.

McNeeley and Daniel Crown were arrested at 8:30 a.m. after ranger Lisette Gonzalez spotted them masturbating, Capt. Jack Hall said.

McNeeley, 60, told rangers he was going to perform oral sex on Crown, 61, but did not, according to a police report.

Crown and McNeeley were together in Crown’s car when the ranger approached and told them to stop their behavior.

McNeeley jumped in his car and tried backing up. He then moved the car back into a parking space, according to the report.

“I’m sorry,” McNeeley told the ranger. “I’m sorry. I just got scared. I shouldn’t have done that.”

McNeeley then asked the ranger to just issue him a warning. She asked him what he was doing in the park.

He blamed his behavior on the stress of his wife being diagnosed with cancer. McNeeley then told the ranger he was retired and asked if he would have to go through a complete booking process.

Crown, of Brooklyn, told rangers he and McNeeley were talking about the weather.

On the way to the ranger station, McNeeley told the ranger he was a retired human-resources worker in Cleveland. But Ranger Sgt. Gerald McFaul Jr., son of former Cuyahoga County Sheriff Gerald McFaul, told the ranger that McNeeley was a former police commander and current police chief, the report states.

Hall said McNeeley did not try to use his police badge to avoid being arrested.

“He never presented his police identification at all,” Hall said.

McNeeley and Crown were each charged with public indecency, a third-degree misdemeanor, and were scheduled to appear in Parma Municipal Court on May 5. Both men posted a personal bond and were released.

McNeeley was a longtime police commander in Cleveland and was briefly considered a successor to McFaul before deciding not to pursue the sheriff’s office.

McNeeley and Crown did not return calls seeking comment.

Olmsted Township police are standing behind McNeeley.

“The department remains supportive of our chief and unequivocally acknowledges Chief McNeeley is the best chief this department and the community has ever had,” Lt. John Minek wrote in a news release. “We as a department stand united and pledge our support to Chief McNeeley and his family during this uneasy time.”

Appeared Here


Connecticut’s High Tech Plan To Track Sex Offenders Crashes And Burns At Taxpayer Expense

April 30, 2009

CONNECTICUT – Tracking bracelets were supposed to make Southbury residents feel safe. Instead, they are sending the wrong signal – maybe even no signal at all.

In September, the GPS tracking system came under fire when the ankle bracelet worn by David Pollitt, a convicted serial rapist, malfunctioned. Residents who live in Pollitt’s Southbury neighborhood say the bracelets can’t be trusted.

“I don’t feel comfortable with it. It’s not reliable,” Cathy Baisch of Southbury said.

“There are so many cloaking devices and ways to run interference, not to mention the problems with the device’s construction,” said Matt Devan of Prospect.

In the state, 81 sex offenders are equipped with GPS monitoring bracelets like Pollitt’s. Neither the state, nor the company that makes them keeps count of the number of times they malfunction.

The executive director of administrative services for the judicial branch said the technology does “glitch” from time to time.

“Frankly, most of them are false alarms, things like low battery, GPS unit out of position, things like that,” said Thomas Siconolfi.

Earlier this month, New Haven police spent hours searching the Long Island Sound after a jogger found an electronic monitoring bracelet floating in the water. Police said the parolee it belonged to was never found.

Siconolfi said the bracelets use tamper-resistant technology, but will not alarm if the offender is in a dead zone.

Another problem the state is dealing with is response time. Siconolfi said it takes an average of 15 to 20 minutes for police to respond to any GPS alerts — and that’s only if the bracelet has a cell signal to communicate the violation. Some lawmakers are outraged.

“It’s absolutely too much time, because by the time the system responds to the violation of this type, the damage has been done and people have been hurt for life,” Rep. Demetrious Giannaros said.

There’s also concern when it comes to monitoring the offenders. Right now, there are no probation officers on the clock on weekends, meaning a call from the vendor to police reporting an alert could go answered.

“This is the first I’m hearing about this. It’s totally unacceptable,” Giannaros said.

Those in charge of the program wanted to fix the problem by opening a monitoring center here in Connecticut.

Right now, most offenders are monitored by employees in Florida. It carried a price tag of $400,000 and at last check, was put on hold indefinitely.

Appeared Here


Faggot Olmsted Township Police Chief Charles McNeeley Arrested During Park Masturbation/Sex Incident

April 30, 2009

CLEVELAND, OHIO – Olmsted Township Police Chief Charles McNeeley was charged with indecent exposure after being arrested with another man Tuesday morning in the Cleveland Metroparks, rangers said.

McNeeley and Daniel Crown were arrested at 8:30 a.m. after ranger Lisette Gonzalez spotted them masturbating, Capt. Jack Hall said.

McNeeley, 60, told rangers he was going to perform oral sex on Crown, 61, but did not, according to a police report.

Crown and McNeeley were together in Crown’s car when the ranger approached and told them to stop their behavior.

McNeeley jumped in his car and tried backing up. He then moved the car back into a parking space, according to the report.

“I’m sorry,” McNeeley told the ranger. “I’m sorry. I just got scared. I shouldn’t have done that.”

McNeeley then asked the ranger to just issue him a warning. She asked him what he was doing in the park.

He blamed his behavior on the stress of his wife being diagnosed with cancer. McNeeley then told the ranger he was retired and asked if he would have to go through a complete booking process.

Crown, of Brooklyn, told rangers he and McNeeley were talking about the weather.

On the way to the ranger station, McNeeley told the ranger he was a retired human-resources worker in Cleveland. But Ranger Sgt. Gerald McFaul Jr., son of former Cuyahoga County Sheriff Gerald McFaul, told the ranger that McNeeley was a former police commander and current police chief, the report states.

Hall said McNeeley did not try to use his police badge to avoid being arrested.

“He never presented his police identification at all,” Hall said.

McNeeley and Crown were each charged with public indecency, a third-degree misdemeanor, and were scheduled to appear in Parma Municipal Court on May 5. Both men posted a personal bond and were released.

McNeeley was a longtime police commander in Cleveland and was briefly considered a successor to McFaul before deciding not to pursue the sheriff’s office.

McNeeley and Crown did not return calls seeking comment.

Olmsted Township police are standing behind McNeeley.

“The department remains supportive of our chief and unequivocally acknowledges Chief McNeeley is the best chief this department and the community has ever had,” Lt. John Minek wrote in a news release. “We as a department stand united and pledge our support to Chief McNeeley and his family during this uneasy time.”

Appeared Here


Dumbass French Lick Indiana Police Officer Justin Mullis Crashes Motorcycle While Escorting Funeral And Dies

April 29, 2009

MARTINSVILLE, INDIANA – An off-duty French Lick police officer was killed Wednesday when his motorcycle crashed while he was escorting a funeral on Indiana 67 in Morgan County.

Morgan County sheriff’s deputies are investigating the crash that occurred shortly after 3:30 p.m. as the funeral procession headed northbound near Martinsville, about 15 miles southwest of Indianapolis.

French Lick Police Chief Thomas McCracken identified the officer as patrol detective Justin Mullis, 48.

McCracken said Mullis lost control of his motorcycle and drove off the roadway, with the motorcycle coming to rest on its side.

Mullis was airlifted to St. Francis Hospital in Mooresville and then again to an Indianapolis hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

No other vehicles were involved in the crash.

Appeared Here


Dumbass French Lick Indiana Police Officer Justin Mullis Crashes Motorcycle While Escorting Funeral And Dies

April 29, 2009

MARTINSVILLE, INDIANA – An off-duty French Lick police officer was killed Wednesday when his motorcycle crashed while he was escorting a funeral on Indiana 67 in Morgan County.

Morgan County sheriff’s deputies are investigating the crash that occurred shortly after 3:30 p.m. as the funeral procession headed northbound near Martinsville, about 15 miles southwest of Indianapolis.

French Lick Police Chief Thomas McCracken identified the officer as patrol detective Justin Mullis, 48.

McCracken said Mullis lost control of his motorcycle and drove off the roadway, with the motorcycle coming to rest on its side.

Mullis was airlifted to St. Francis Hospital in Mooresville and then again to an Indianapolis hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

No other vehicles were involved in the crash.

Appeared Here


Chicago Illinois Deputy U.S. Marshal John T. Ambrose Found Guilty After Leaking Secrets To Mafia

April 28, 2009

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – A deputy U.S. marshal has been convicted in Chicago of leaking secret information to the mob about a protected witness in a federal organized crime investigation.

Deputy marshal John T. Ambrose stared straight ahead as jurors returned the verdict Tuesday following almost three days of deliberation.

Prosecutors say it was the first time in the 39-year history of the government’s witness security program that its secrecy was deliberately violated.

Prosecutors say they realized there was a leak when two mobsters were overheard in a prison visiting room talking about having a “mole” inside federal law enforcement.

The 42-year-old Ambrose was acquitted of two charges of lying to federal agents.

Appeared Here