Police In Spain Beating Everyone In Sight – Young, Old, Men, And Women

October 8, 2012

SPAIN – Spain’s police state has spiraled out of control as riot police are now running throughout the streets beating everyone in sight, men and woman, young and old.

When the people demand democracy from an oligarchy that rules their subjects trough the strong-arm of a totalitarian police state the streets fill with the madness and mayhem seen in this video.

Since September 25th the masses of Spain, no longer being able to feed themselves or their families, have risen up against the oligarchy to protest further budget cuts and massive tax increases a situation so dire it threatens their very survival.

While the masses suffer those the poor are being robbed yet again to bail out the rich.

The overlords have no sympathy for the less fortunate and instead of forcing the bankers to take the loses on their investments the ruling class remains disconnected from the reality of millions.

The unrest has spans across Europe into several nations being forced the pinch out the masses by globalist regulatory bodies claiming nations need to get their fiscal house in order

But as we have seen in every previous past crash situations such as these are used as nothing more than excuse to help the rich reduce their own tax burden and the operating costs of the corporations they run.

Yet this time around the downward spiral only continues to self-perpetuate and deepen as the funds collected with each passing austerity cut are spent funding yet another banker bailout which acts as nothing more than a band-aid on a hemorrhaging gashes of a collapsing economic system that has struck with a self-inflicted mortal wound delivered by a trifecta of rapacious greed, rampant fraud and unbearable corruption.

Soon America will face the same fate is its own financial house is much worse than that of Spain and instead of blaming the trillions wasted on implementing an Orwellian control totalitarian police state complete with kidnapping, tortures, assassinations and the mass murder of millions in illegal overseas wars the bullseye will be aimed directly at the middle class when they are already suffering through one of the worst economic crisises in the history of this nation.

Our politicians seem to be so utterly incompetent the can accomplish nothing besides lining their own pockets with money but they are world-renowned experts at kicking the can down road.

Come this January the Fiscal cliff will be staring them in the face and they may find when they try kicking the can this time it just won’t move.

If that happens then America will face its first of several rounds of across the board Austerity cuts and feel for the first time pain of the bite that has bitten the people of Europe repeatedly over the last several years.

With many Americans already so-inclined to take their grievances out into the streets we will certainly do so in solidarity with our brothers and sisters overseas.

As we have seen with the Occupy movement even nonviolent mass protests have been met with the authoritarian fist of the Oligarchy’s army of mercenaries so we can be rest assured when those numbers swell into the millions, as they have in Spain and several other European nations, the response the police state will be just as brutal.

Brace yourself America as our streets may soon resemble those in Spain where a rampantly brutal and out control police is acting swiftly to crush any popular resistance to Global cabal.

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Mexico Sees Wave Of Immigrants As Wetbacks And Americans Either Choose Or Are Forced To Get Of Of The United States

October 7, 2012

MONTERREY, MEXICO – When Pete Navarro showed up three years ago in this industrial city a few hours’ drive from the border, he spoke barely a word of Spanish and hardly knew a soul.

The San Antonio resident, who went to Jay High School, lost his legal residency in December 2009 and was deported to his native Mexico. He hadn’t been there since he was a child, and the only people he knew were his aunt and her family. He left his parents and two children in San Antonio.

“So when I got here, my two cousins were my best friends, because they could speak English,” Navarro said.

Navarro, 33, has taken part in a historic migration. For the first time in decades, more people are moving from the U.S. to Mexico than are coming to the U.S. from Mexico, the Pew Hispanic Center reported in April. Some, like Navarro, are deported, but the vast majority came to Mexico voluntarily, according to the report.

It can be difficult for those who come voluntarily and involuntarily. Many struggle with the language, have trouble in Mexican schools and find it difficult to integrate into Mexican society.

But they also find opportunity, often thanks to the English they learned growing up north of the Rio Grande.

It took Navarro only a few days to find an industry waiting with open arms to accept workers from the wave of more than a million people who have moved from the U.S. to Mexico in recent years: call centers.

The Monterrey call center industry employs thousands, many of them English speakers who grew up in the U.S. The city, with a population of 1.14 million and with millions more in the metro area, primarily is a manufacturing center. But in the past decade, a burgeoning call center industry has cropped up, said Roberto Fuerte, executive director of the northeast Mexico chapter of the United States-Mexico Chamber of Commerce.

The phone operations provide a range of services and don’t all require top-flight English, so many are staffed by students from the area’s several universities, Fuerte said.

But the centers provide a landing place for English-speakers marching south.

“When that Pew study came out, it was interesting to see it in an academic format,” said Bill Colton, a Washington businessman and the president of a small Monterrey call center. “But it was in no way surprising to people here.”

Colton’s Global Telesourcing, where Navarro is one of about 300 employees, mostly hires people who spent their formative years in the U.S.

That means they speak excellent English, understand U.S. slang and are familiar with the products they’re selling, such as Internet, cable and cellphone services. Many have worked at Monterrey’s larger call centers, Colton said.

“Because the level of (sales) agent we’re able to attract in Mexico is much better than the same dollars we would be able to buy in the U.S., we’re a much better call center,” Colton said. “These guys you couldn’t attract to work at a call center in the U.S.”

No welcome mat

That’s certainly true of Navarro, who said he was making a better living as an auto mechanic, a skill he’d learned at St. Phillip’s College, before he was deported.

He’d recently divorced his wife and won custody of his children in 2009 when U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents arrested him at his South Side home and deported him over a pair of years-old marijuana possession charges. Now, he lives alone in Monterrey while his children remain in San Antonio with his parents.

“The fact that these guys came to my door one day, it changed my life,” Navarro said. “It flipped everything around.”

He likes working on cars, but in Mexico, it doesn’t pay nearly as well as the call center. Navarro said he made about $1,200 a week in San Antonio. Today, he makes about $500, a pretty sum in most parts of Mexico, but not in Monterrey, one of the most expensive cities in the country.

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Thousands Of American Lives And TRILLIONS Of Dollars Latter, US Lead War On Taliban Just Beginning – Taliban Mock America On 12th Anniversary Of War US Can Never Win

October 7, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC – America’s longest war entered its 12th year Sunday, with the anniversary marked by a Taliban statement claiming that NATO forces are “fleeing Afghanistan” in “humiliation and disgrace”.

The US led the invasion on October 7, 2001 to topple the Taliban government for harbouring Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden after the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington.

The Taliban were quickly routed, but launched an insurgency that grew in strength over the years until NATO had some 130,000 troops from 50 countries defending the Western-backed government of President Hamid Karzai.

The troops have now begun pulling out and all foreign combat forces will be gone by the end of 2014 according to a withdrawal schedule agreed by the US and NATO.

“With the help of Allah, the valiant Afghans under the Jihadi leadership of Islamic Emirate defeated the military might and numerous strategies of America and NATO alliance,” the Taliban said in a statement Sunday.

“And now after eleven years of unceasing terror, tyranny, crimes and savagery, they are fleeing Afghanistan with such humiliation and disgrace that they are struggling to provide an explanation”.

A total of 3,199 NATO soldiers have been killed in the war, more than 2,000 of them Americans. Most deaths occurred in the past five years as Taliban attacks escalated, according to icasualties.com.

This year, official statistics showed that deaths in the Afghan security forces are running five times higher than those for NATO, as the Afghans take on increasing responsibilities before the Western withdrawal.

The US and NATO say Afghan forces will be capable of taking over the fight against the Taliban after 2014, but many analysts predict a bloody new multi-factional civil war.

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FBI Finally Shows Up At Abandoned Benghazi Libya Embassy Three Weeks After Attacks – Claimed It Was Too Dangerous Until Now, But Looters, Curiosity Seekers, And Reporters Had No Problems At Site

October 5, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC — Escorted by several dozen Special Operations forces, F.B.I. agents on Thursday entered the ruins of the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, as part of their investigation into the killings there of ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.

Security fears had kept the F.B.I. agents from traveling the 400 miles from the American Embassy in Tripoli, the Libyan capital, to collect evidence at a crime scene that was trampled, looted and badly burned by militants more than three weeks ago. Administration officials said Thursday the delay was caused in part by the Libyan government, which they described as slow in granting approval for the mission.

The officials said the agents flew from Tripoli in a C-130 military transport plane and were then driven to the compound in armored cars. The officials did not say how many F.B.I. agents were involved or precisely how long they were on the ground. The Pentagon press secretary, George Little, would only say at a briefing that the agents and their military escorts were in Benghazi “for a number of hours” before returning to Tripoli.

The agents were specialists in evidence collection, according to law enforcement officials, and were there to sift through the wreckage and to determine in better detail how the attack unfolded. It is unclear how much can still be gleaned from the site, which a senior American law enforcement official has described as so badly “degraded” that linking evidence to the attackers will be difficult at best.

Already looters, curiosity seekers and reporters have been through the site, which is only protected by two private security guards hired by the compound’s Libyan owner, The Washington Post reported Thursday. On Wednesday, a Post reporter at the site discovered loosely secured sensitive documents about American operations in Libya, some of which were turned over to the State Department. Last month CNN discovered Mr. Stevens’s diary in the wreckage.

It is unclear if the F.B.I. investigators plan to return to the site, but Mr. Little hinted that they might. He offered few details about the military escort operation, adding, “We may need to replicate it in the future, and I wouldn’t want to tip off the wrong people.”

It appears that the F.B.I. spent little or no time interviewing residents in Benghazi. Typically they would spend weeks, rather than hours, at a crime scene as important to national security as this site. The F.B.I., which always investigates the deaths of American overseas under suspicious circumstances, has agents from its national security division and New York field office in Libya. They have been operating largely out of the American Embassy in Tripoli, now guarded by a force of 50 elite Marines trained to protect American diplomatic posts in crisis.

But even in Tripoli the investigation has been hobbled by the tenuous security in Libya after the overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi. Late last month investigators were so fearful about the risks of taking some potential Libyan witnesses into the American Embassy that they resorted to questioning people in cars outside the embassy.

The agents are also operating without any help on the ground from the C.I.A., which had about a dozen intelligence operatives and contractors in Benghazi until the attacks, conducting surveillance and collecting information on militant groups in the city. They were among more than two dozen American personnel evacuated from Benghazi after the attack.

American counterterrorism officials and Benghazi residents are now focused on a local militant group, Ansar al-Shariah, as the main force behind the attack, which occurred on the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

President Obama has vowed to bring the killers to justice, and the United States is now laying the groundwork for possible operations to kill or capture militants implicated in the attack. The options could include drone strikes, Special Operations raids and joint missions with the Libyan authorities. But the Libyan government opposes any unilateral American military operation in Libya against the attackers, and administration officials say no decisions have been made about attacking any potential targets.

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New Questions Arise Over New Zealand Government’s Illegal Spying – County’s CIA Equivalent Illegaly Spied On Behalf Of New Zealand And US Governments In Now-Doomed FILE SHARING Case

October 5, 2012

NEW ZEALAND – The slow-motion train wreck of the Megaupload investigation rumbles on, with a new report alleging Kim Dotcom’s Internet connection showed signs of interference earlier than New Zealand’s Government Communications Security Bureau had admitted.

According to the New Zealand Herald, Dotcom’s ping times were under investigation by his ISP, Gen-I, as far back as November 2011. The GCSB has only admitted to tapping his connections between December and Dotcom’s arrest in January. In September, prime minister Key apologised1 for the illegal wiretaps.

The Herald report states that Dotcom’s Modern Warfare 3 ping went from 30 milliseconds to 180 milliseconds in November 2011, and a traceroute found three extra hops within New Zealand added to his path to the XBox server Dotcom used to play the game.

Dotcom was proud of his worldwide number-one ranking on the game, something which can at least in part be attributed to the fibre connection he installed to the mansion he occupied at Coatesville, near Auckland.

The internal GCSB investigation sparked by the illegal Dotcom taps revealed at least three other cases in which illegal snooping may have taken place.

Although the PM says the GCSB has given a fresh assurance that there was no spying on Dotcom prior to December, the allegation will shake any trust New Zealanders have in its spy agency, and both Labor and the Greens are calling for an independent inquiry into the agency.

It’s quite possible, of course, that the routing issues investigated by Gen-I had nothing to do with spying; however, if the GCSB was responsible for the extra 150 ms ping and three new route hops – both easily visible to the end user – the revelation would call into question not only its honesty, but its competence

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Sensitive Documents Left Behind As US Abandons US Embassy In Benghazi Libya

October 3, 2012

BENGHAZI, LIBYA — More than three weeks after attacks in this city killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans, sensitive documents remained only loosely secured in the wreckage of the U.S. diplomatic post on Wednesday, offering visitors easy access to delicate information about American operations in Libya.

Documents detailing weapons collection efforts, emergency evacuation protocols, the full internal itinerary of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens’s trip and the personnel records of Libyans who were contracted to secure the post were among the items scattered across the floors of the looted compound when a Washington Post reporter and an interpreter visited Wednesday.

The discovery further complicates efforts by the Obama administration to respond to what has rapidly become a major foreign-policy issue just weeks before the election. Republicans have accused Obama of having left U.S. diplomatic compounds in Muslim-majority nations insufficiently protected on the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, and have questioned the security preparations ahead of assaults on embassies in Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia and Sudan. Capitol Hill critics have also pressed for an explanation for the slow pace of the investigation that has followed the attack in Benghazi.

Although the gates to the Benghazi compound were locked several days after the attacks, looters and curiosity-seekers were free to roam in the initial chaotic aftermath, and many documents may already have disappeared.

No government-provided security forces are guarding the compound, and Libyan investigators have visited just once, according to a member of the family who owns the compound and who allowed the journalists to enter Wednesday.

Two private security guards paid for by the compound’s Libyan owner are the only people watching over the sprawling site, which is composed of two adjoining villa complexes and protected in some places by a wall only eight feet high.

“Securing the site has obviously been a challenge,” Mark Toner, deputy spokesman at the State Department, said in response to questions about conditions at the Benghazi compound. “We had to evacuate all U.S. government personnel the night of the attack. After the attack, we requested help securing the site, and we continue to work with the Libyan government on this front.”

State Department officials were provided with copies of some of the documents found at the site. They did not request that the documents be withheld from publication.

None of the documents were marked classified, but this is not the first time that sensitive documents have been found by journalists in the charred wreckage of the compound. CNN discovered a copy of the ambassador’s journal last month and broadcast details from it, drawing an angry response from the State Department. Unlike the journal, all of the documents seen by The Post were official.

At least one document found amid the clutter indicates that Americans at the post were discussing the possibility of an attack in early September, just two days before the assault took place. The document is a memorandum dated Sept. 9 from the U.S. post’s security office to the 17th February Martyrs Brigade, the Libyan-government-sanctioned militia that was guarding the compound, making plans for a “quick reaction force,” or QRF, that would provide security.

“In the event of an attack on the U.S. Mission,” the document states, “QRF will request additional support from the 17th February Martyrs Brigade.”

Other documents detail — with names, photographs, phone numbers and other personal information — the Libyans contracted to provide security for the post from a British-based private firm, Blue Mountain. Some of those Libyans say they now fear for their lives, and the State Department has said it shares concerns about their safety.

“The guys with beards may endanger my life,” said one Libyan contractor, referring to the people who attacked the U.S. post. He spoke on the condition of anonymity, but his photograph, phone number, birthday, age, religion, English-language skills, Libyan national identity number, marital status, method of transport to work and first date of employment at the post were all listed in a document found at the site, along with similarly detailed information about 13 others and basic information about dozens more.

On Tuesday, two House Republicans sent a letter to Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton demanding more information about the assault on the Benghazi compound. The letter from Darrell Issa (Calif.) and Jason Chaffetz (Utah) said Libyans working as private security personnel at the compound were warned by family members in the weeks before the attacks to quit their jobs because of rumors of an impending attack. The congressmen did not say where they had received the information.

Concerns about safety in Benghazi have confined a team of FBI investigators to the Libyan capital, Tripoli, which is hundreds of miles away, and local security officials say they cannot guarantee that Americans would be safe here.

“We don’t have institutions,” said Col. Salah bin Omran, the newly appointed military head of Rafallah al-Sahati, a government-backed militia that is one of the main groups providing security in Benghazi. “The security for normal people is fine. But I don’t know. If the Americans come, I’m not sure they’ll be completely safe.”

FBI spokesman Paul Bresson would not comment Wednesday on the agents’ location. “We’re continuing with our investigation, and we have not commented on the specific location of our agents or resources,” Bresson said.

The delays may have significantly complicated efforts to interview or detain members of Ansar al-Sharia, the militant Islamist militia that the U.S. government suspects played an important role in the attack. Late last month, the militia’s compound was stormed by angry protesters, and its members have gone underground, taking their weapons with them after living openly in Benghazi for more than a week after the attack on the U.S. post.

Many of the Libyan contractors, as well as some members of the brigade once tasked with guarding the compound, say they have not been contacted by the Libyan or U.S. governments about their safety concerns. Some say they have tried to contact the Americans but have not received a response.

The Blue Mountain contractors were intended to complement the armed members of the militia. Both groups were present on the night of Sept. 11.

In the unsigned memorandum from the U.S. post to the militia, which appears to be a draft, guards “are required to acquire and maintain their own weapons and ammunition,” the document states.

The security presence appears to have been bare-bones, with three or more armed militia members on the compound any time the “principal officer” was present — either the head of the outpost or the ambassador. A somewhat larger group of unarmed contractors was also hired to guard the site but was not mentioned in the memorandum with the militia.

When the principal officer was not present, a single militia member was instructed to be at the front gate between 8 a.m. and midnight. Between midnight and 8 a.m., one militia member was scheduled to be on roving patrol. The militia members were supposed to work a minimum of eight hours a day and were to be paid a stipend of about $28 a day, a relatively standard wage. They were housed on the U.S. compound.

The memorandum tells the militia security force to summon more guards from its nearby base if the post is attacked, suggesting that the Americans there were concerned that the regular guard force would be inadequate in an emergency.

The itinerary of Stevens’s trip to Benghazi includes a near-full accounting of his planned movements during what was supposed to be a visit that lasted from Sept. 10 until Sept. 15. It includes names and phone numbers of Libyans who were scheduled to meet with him. Some of those Libyans have not made their contact with Stevens public and could be at risk if it were publicly known.

The meetings include briefings with U.S. officials, a private dinner with influential local leaders, and meetings with militia heads, businesspeople, civil society activists and educators. The highlight of the visit was the opening of the American Space, a center intended to serve as a hub for U.S. culture and education.

Several copies of the itinerary were scattered across multiple rooms of the compound. One appears to be a page from the ambassador’s personal copy; it was on the floor, next to a chair in the bedroom where he had been sleeping.

The compound still reeked of smoke Wednesday, and all of the buildings had been looted. Overturned furniture, broken glass and strewn documents were everywhere. Chandeliers lay on the floor. In kitchens, food was rotting.

But elsewhere on the compound, gardens were blooming and untouched. Guava trees were heavy with fruit; purple grapes were swelling on rows of vines. The newly hired security guards appeared to be living in a small room at the front gate, where a thin mattress lay on the floor, along with preparations for lunch.

Anne Gearan, Sari Horwitz and Ernesto Londoño in Washington and Ayman Alkekly in Benghazi contributed to this report.

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New High Definition Cameras Installed In UK Put Human Rights At Risk – Can Identify And Track Individuals From Half A Mile Away

October 3, 2012

UK – CCTV systems capable of identifying and tracking a person’s face from half a mile away are turning Britain into a Big Brother society, the UK’s first surveillance commissioner has warned.

New high-definition cameras are being rolled out across UK cities without public consultation into the intrusion they pose, Andrew Rennison told The Independent.

The increasing sophistication of surveillance technology is becoming so serious that Britain may be in breach of its own human rights laws, he said. There are already thought to be around 1.85 million CCTV cameras in the UK.

In a stark message to police forces and the Government, Mr Rennison predicted there will be a justifiable public outcry if facial recognition systems and HD cameras are allowed to proliferate on high streets, public transport and at entertainment venues. “The technology has overtaken our ability to regulate it,” he said.

“I’m convinced that if we don’t regulate it properly – ie, the technological ability to use millions of images we capture – there will be a huge public backlash. It is the Big Brother scenario playing out large. It’s the ability to pick out your face in a crowd from a camera which is probably half a mile away.”

Mr Rennison was named as the country’s first Surveillance Commissioner by the Home Office last month, having held the role on an interim basis since 2009. The former police officer said that disproportionate and invasive monitoring was of great concern as HD cameras are “popping up all over the place”.

“The rapid advancement of digital technology means that 16-megapixel HD cameras are now very affordable, so people are buying a camera with a huge optical and digital zoom power.

“A tiny camera in a dome with a 360-degree view can capture your face in the crowd, and there are now the algorithms that run in the background. I’ve seen the test reviews that show there’s a high success rate of picking out your face against a database of known faces.”

Research into automatic facial recognition being carried out by the Home Office has reached a 90 per cent success rate, he said, and it was “improving by the day”.

He said cameras are “storing all the images they record … and the capability is there to run your image against a database of wanted people.”

The anti-surveillance campaign group Big Brother Watch recently found that at least 51,600 CCTV cameras are being used by 428 local authorities – and that 100,000 are in use in schools, with as many as 200 using them inside toilets and changing rooms. More than a million cameras have also been installed on private land.

Mr Rennison is currently only responsible for technology employed in state-owned public places, covering less than 5 per cent of the cameras in the country.

But the Government intends to widen his remit to include schools and hospitals eventually, as well as shopping centres, whose cameras are private yet have effectively become “tools of the state”, according to Mr Rennison.

Mr Rennison – who is overseeing the introduction of the first official code of conduct for CCTV use and will report back to Parliament in April – added that the explosion of powerful surveillance technology could be in breach of Article 8 of the Human Rights Act, which seeks to protect “private and family life”.

“I’d like the lawyers to help work our way through that and decide whether we remain Article 8 compliant in this country,” he said. “I don’t want the state to carry on and start pushing the boundaries. Let’s have a debate – if the public support it, then fine. If the public don’t support it, and we need to increase the regulation, then that’s what we need to do.”

Mr Rennison said most people have no idea how advanced the technology has become and of its power to intrude in their lives.

While automatic number-plate recognition systems are now used by every police force in the country remotely to track suspect vehicles’ movements, systems to identify people reminiscent of science fiction films are also becoming available.

“The biometric technology … has to be regulated to forensic standards – facial recognition, facial comparison, gait analysis – because that is a whole new area in forensic science.”

Case study: Mass surveillance scheme foiled by local resistance

An ill-fated plan by the West Midlands police to place several hundred CCTV cameras in part of Birmingham was scrapped in 2010 after a backlash from the local community which complained that the scheme was targeting the mainly Muslim local population.

Police insisted that the cameras were designed to cut local crime and told a community meeting that they provided an “exciting opportunity to track drug dealers selling crack, cocaine and heroin to your children”.

But the community leaders reacted angrily when it emerged that £3m funding came from a pot to combat terrorism. The case was highlighted by Andrew Rennison, the surveillance commissioner, as an example of where the system had not worked. Officials involved in the scheme accepted that they should have been more open about the source of funding for the cameras.

The furore over the cameras, which were installed without consultation, prompted a rapid about-turn by the force which initially put bags over the cameras to put them out of use.

The force confirmed yesterday that the cameras – which were also used to recognise car number plates – were later deployed to other forces for use in the run-up to the Olympic Games.

The case added to concerns about the effectiveness of CCTV cameras in detecting crime. A Freedom of Information request by The Daily Telegraph found in 2009 that the Metropolitan Police’s own research suggested that 1,000 CCTV cameras solved less than one crime per year.

The findings led to demands by the campaigning group Big Brother Watch for police forces and other public authorities to publish crime statistics showing the effectiveness of CCTV cameras and a reassessment of their role.

A report by Big Brother Watch this year found that there were at least 51,600 CCTV cameras controlled by more than 400 local authorities, costing hundreds of millions of pounds. It said Birmingham spent the most – £14m – on cameras with Westminster just behind with nearly £12m. It also found that five authorities had a total of more than 1,000 CCTV cameras.

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