Iowa City Residents Face Huge Fine For Not Answering Their Front Door When Police Knock

August 23, 2012

IOWA CITY, IOWA – Iowa City may soon have a new way to go after hosts of wild house parties who try to avoid the police.

The City Council voted 7-0 Tuesday night on the first consideration of an ordinance amending the city’s nuisance rental property regulations to allow for a civil citation for disorderly house when occupants do not answer the door.

Currently it’s handled with a criminal complaint, but occupants — typically college students — are increasingly refusing to open the door for officers, city officials said.

In those situations, a search warrant would be necessary to get inside, but that could take a couple of hours, if it’s successful, and police Chief Sam Hargadine said that wasn’t a good use of his officers’ time.

Council member Terry Dickens said he did a ride along with police one night and saw officers knock on an apartment door for several minutes with a party going on inside.

“It was very frustrating for me to sit there and watch the officers to try to get someone to answer the door,” he said.

City staffers asked for the change because they want a way to get to an intervention process they say is successful at stopping problems.

Currently, if there’s a disorderly house and there’s a criminal complaint, that triggers a letter being sent to all of the tenants and the landlord. A second complaint results in a mandatory meeting.

Last year, there were 175 first-time offenses, eight second offenses and no third offenses, said Doug Boothroy, Iowa City’s director of housing and inspection services.

City Attorney Eleanor Dilkes said that if the ordinance is changed and a police officer encounters a disorderly house but can’t get anyone to answer the door, he would tell the city’s housing inspectors he has grounds to prove it’s a disorderly house, and that would trigger the municipal infraction process. There may not necessarily be a citation, however, depending on what staff finds out and the response from the violators, she said.

In a criminal citation, only the people present at the party would be charged, Dilkes said. With a civil infraction, all of the tenants could be cited.

Greg Bal, supervising attorney for the University of Iowa Student Legal Services, said last week he believes that would violate someone’s right to due process.

Iowa City Attorney Christopher Warnock, who was not at the meeting, also warned the city might be walking a fine line with due process.

“It’s fine as long as these tenants get the opportunity to come in and say, ‘No, it wasn’t me. I wasn’t there,’ ” Warnock explained.

Boothroy has said tenants would get that chance in court.

Iowa City resident Jean Walker said in an interview that house parties were big problems before city leaders started to fight back against the noise.

“You might go over and talk with them, and they’d quiet down, then a few minutes later it’d start up again,” she said.

A civil infraction would carry a $750 fine for a first offense and a $1,000 fine for subsequent offenses.

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DEA Drops Charges Against Doctor In Largest Prosecution Of Multi-Million Dollar Internet Pharmacies Because Continued Storage Of 400,000 Documents, 2 Terabytes Of Data, Computers, Servers And Other Items Is Too Difficult And Expensive – Data Occupied 5% Of Agency’s Worldwide Electronic Storage

August 16, 2012

IOWA CITY, IOWA – A fugitive doctor charged in the nation’s largest prosecution of Internet pharmacies is getting off in part because there’s just too much evidence: more than 400,000 documents and two terabytes of electronic data that federal authorities say is expensive to maintain.

Armando Angulo was indicted in 2007 in a multimillion dollar scheme that involved selling prescription drugs to patients who were never examined or even interviewed by a physician. A federal judge in Iowa dismissed the charge last week at the request of prosecutors, who want to throw out the many records collected over their nine-year investigation to free up space.

The Miami doctor fled to his native Panama after coming under investigation in 2004, and Panamanian authorities say they do not extradite their own citizens. Given the unlikelihood of capturing Angulo and the inconvenience of maintaining so much evidence, prosecutors gave up the long pursuit.

“Continued storage of these materials is difficult and expensive,” wrote Stephanie Rose, the U.S. attorney for northern Iowa. She called the task “an economic and practical hardship” for the Drug Enforcement Administration.

The case started in 2003 with a raid of a small Iowa drugstore and eventually secured the conviction of 26 defendants, including 19 doctors. The investigation dismantled two Internet pharmacies that illegally sold 30 million pills to customers. Investigators also recovered $7 million, most of which went to Iowa police agencies that helped with the case.

When a major drug suspect flees the country, federal authorities often leave the charges pending in the event the fugitive tries to sneak back into the U.S. or a country with a friendly extradition process. But in Angulo’s case, the volume of evidence posed a bigger burden.

The evidence took up 5 percent of the DEA’s worldwide electronic storage. Agents had also kept several hundred boxes of paper containing 440,000 documents, plus dozens of computers, servers and other bulky items.

Two terabytes is enough to store the text of 2 million novels, or roughly 625,000 copies of “War and Peace.”

Two-terabyte memory drives are widely available for $100, but the DEA’s data server must be relatively small and may need replacement, a costly and risky proposition for an agency that must maintain the integrity of documents, said University of Iowa computer scientist Douglas Jones.

“A responsible organization doesn’t upgrade every time new technology is available. That’s all they would be doing,” Jones said. “But the result is you end up in situations like this where the capacity they have is not quite up to the incredible volume of data involved.”

Randy Stock, who runs the website whatsabyte.com, which explains electronic storage, said he doubted that storing the data would have been that problematic for the government.

“I’m thinking that excuse is just their easy way out,” he wrote in an e-mail.

U.S. District Judge Linda Reade dismissed the case with prejudice, meaning it cannot be refiled.

Angulo, 59, was accused of improperly authorizing thousands of prescriptions for pain pills, diet medication and other drugs while working for Pharmacom International Corp., a Florida-based Internet company that operated from 2003 to 2004.

The company’s doctors approved prescriptions without examining patients, communicating with them or verifying their identities, prosecutors said. Three Pharmacom officials and a person who recruited doctors were sentenced to prison. Eight physicians pleaded guilty to conspiracy to illegally distribute controlled substances and launder the proceeds.

The investigation began after agents raided the Union Family Pharmacy in Dubuque and found evidence that it had illegally dispensed medication for Pharmacom and another Internet company, Medical Web Services, which pleaded guilty. Eleven of its physicians were also prosecuted.

Angulo fled to Panama around the time Florida regulators suspended his medical license for prescribing controlled substances to Medicaid patients “in excessive quantities and without medical justification.” An audit found his prescriptions cost Medicaid $6.5 million over six years and caused addiction and dangerous health risks.

Investigators know Angulo’s whereabouts in Panama, which has an extradition treaty with the U.S. to return fugitives. But a spokeswoman for the Panamanian Embassy in Washington said the country never received a formal extradition petition for Angulo and that the country’s constitution bars the extradition of Panamanian citizens.

The dismissal of the charges does not mean Angulo is free to return to the U.S. He is still listed as one of Florida’s most wanted criminals and is being sought for separate Medicaid fraud and narcotics charges in that state.

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Pleasant Hill Iowa Police Officer Craig Brooks Charged With Drinking In Public

July 21, 2012

PLEASANT HILL, IOWA – Pleasant Hill police officer Christopher Craig Brooks, 28, was charged with public consumption on Saturday, according to Iowa court records.

Pleasant Hill Police Chief Tim Sittig confirmed Wednesday morning the weekend incident involving Brooks, who has not worked any shifts for the Pleasant Hill Police Department since receiving the $123 charge, Sittig said.

“He was issued a citation and released for open consumption in Des Moines,” Sittig said, adding the department has not yet determined the consequences for their officer. “We’re right in the middle of an internal (investigation), so we don’t know which way we’re going to go.”

Sittig said he learned of the incident Saturday night through his staff, which was notified by Des Moines authorities. The chief said whether the individual was the first person to notify the department of the offense can give some bearing on the consequences, which are determined on a case-by-case basis.

“Every situation is different, so you have to take each situation on its own merits,” Sittig said.

Brooks, 28, of Altoona, has spent a little more than three years with the Pleasant Hill Police Department, according to the city manager, and ran for Altoona City Council in the fall. Council member Mike Harmeyer beat Brooks in a runoff election in December.

More recently, Brooks was involved in an internal investigation by the Pleasant Hill Police Department prompted by complaints and allegations against the police chief and the City of Pleasant Hill from Christopher’s parents and private investigators, Craig and Debbie Brooks. The allegations – which were later dismissed after Moulder and Associates conducted an investigation – involved derogatory and slanderous comments and tolerance of violence within the police department.

City Manager Don Sandor said he expects the department to make a decision about the consequences for Brooks’ offense by the end of the week. Sandor also said he believes this is the first incident of a Pleasant Hill police officer being charged with public consumption.

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Dumbass Davenport Iowa Officals Send Notice To Wrong Address, Sends City Workers To Remove Couple’s Religious Items From Private Property, And Now City Has To Pay To Replace Items

June 27, 2012

DAVENPORT, IOWA – Mack Covey and his wife Merla were surprised one morning to find strangers in their backyard, taking things without notice, with not even a knock on the front door.

“Bottom line my freedom of religion was violated big time,” Covey says, “The door to the teepee was taken and the buffalo robe.”

“That was my teepee, which was an actual church,” he says of the items’ importance, “We’ve had ceremony here in it.”

Other non-religious items like umbrellas and cleaning poles were also taken, in total about $2300 worth of things Covey wants back.

“I just want what’s fair,” Covey says, “The monetary means to replace the items they blatantly stole. We weren’t notified, bottom line.”

TV6 spoke with Alderman Bill Boom today who says a notice was sent, but to the wrong address. He tell us the city was notified when a neighbor complained, citing items in the backyard, both religious and non-religious, as an environmental hazard. The city sent workers in to clean up what they call ‘debris,’ but Covey disagrees.

“It’d be like me going into one of the churches here in town and taking a cross,” he says, “That’s how much significance it has to me.”

The couple and their supporters have contacted public works and city aldermen, who have come to sort out the issue at the couple’s home. Officials say they’re working on a resolution.

“The workers I’m sure did not know what they took,” Covey says, “This is as important as life and death itself.”

An attorney for the city tells us the yard is in violation of an environmental ordinance that says residents have to keep your lawns clean and clear of debris. City officials say they’ve apologized to the couple and they’re in the process of paying them back so they can replace the items gone.

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EPA Using Airborne Drones To Spy On Farmers In Nebraska And Iowa

June 4, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC – Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency is using aerial drones to spy on farmers in Nebraska and Iowa. The surveillance came under scrutiny last week when Nebraska’s congressional delegation sent a joint letter to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson.

On Friday, EPA officialdom in “Region 7” responded to the letter.

“Courts, including the Supreme Court, have found similar types of flights to be legal (for example to take aerial photographs of a chemical manufacturing facility) and EPA would use such flights in appropriate instances to protect people and the environment from violations of the Clean Water Act,” the agency said in response to the letter.

“They are just way on the outer limits of any authority they’ve been granted,” said Mike Johanns, a Republican senator from Nebraska.

In fact, the EPA has absolutely zero authority and is an unconstitutional entity of an ever-expanding and rogue federal government. Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution does not authorize Congress to legislate in the area of the environment. Under the Tenth Amendment, this authority is granted to the states and their legislatures, not the federal government.

The EPA has not addressed the constitutional question, including its wanton violation of probable cause under the Fourth Amendment. It merely states that it has authority to surveil the private property of farmers and ranchers. It defends its encroaching behavior as “cost-efficient.”

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Des Moines Iowa Police Offcer Brandon Singleton Fired After Hit And Run Accident, Posssession Of Methamphetamine, And Sleeping On The Job

May 17, 2012

DES MOINES IOWA – A Des Moines police officer arrested last month for drug possession has been fired from the Des Moines Police Department.

Des Moines Police Chief Judy Bradshaw terminated Officer Brandon Singleton’s employment Wednesday morning, three weeks after authorities arrested him following a hit and run accident.

He had been on paid leave since April 24.

“The most important thing between a police department and citizens is trust,” Bradshaw said Wednesday. “We recognize one individual has impacted and diminished that trust. But this is not reflective of the rest of our men and women, who are committed to their job.”

Singleton is charged with causing a hit and run accident, possession of marijuana, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. While much of the focus has been on the drug charges, Singleton ultimately was fired for a laundry list of administrative offenses including sleeping on duty, leaving the area of his assignment, vehicle accidents and failing to meet various standards of personal conduct.

He also was terminated for violating the city’s alcohol and drug abuse policy, which says employees may not possess illegal substances, report to work while their ability to perform the job is impaired by drug or alcohol use or use drugs or alcohol at work.

Officials would not release precisely which of those tenets Singleton violated because the termination is a personnel issue.

Officials said they couldn’t divulge whether Singleton had been tested for drugs that night as part of the internal investigation because of personnel policies and medical privacy laws.

But the department’s investigation was “very thorough,” said Des Moines Police Sgt. Chris Scott. Authorities had said they didn’t believe he had the drugs for law enforcement purposes.

Officials also declined to say whether Singleton had any previous disciplinary issues.

Police launched both internal and criminal investigations April 24. That morning, Singleton apparently crashed his squad car around 1 a.m. in the 3800 block of East Ovid Avenue and drove away.

More than five hours later, he told dispatchers he needed help changing a tire in the 2600 block of Dean Avenue – more than three miles away.

A police supervisor noticed damage to the patrol car didn’t match Singleton’s description of what happened and an officer spotted marijuana in the car, officials said. A search turned up meth and drug paraphernalia, authorities said.

The criminal investigation is still ongoing.

Singleton’s attorney has said the former officer suffers from narcolepsy and post traumatic stress disorder.

He has 14 days to appeal the chief’s decision.

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Des Moines Police Officer Brandon Singleton Crashed Patrol Car, Took Off, Five Hours Latter Needed Help Changing Tire, And Other Officers Found Meth And Pot In His Car – Previously Arrested On Drug Charges

April 25, 2012

DES MOINES, IOWA – A Des Moines police officer had methamphetamine and marijuana in his patrol car Tuesday morning when he was involved in at least his second traffic accident during almost five years with the department, authorities said.

Officer Brandon Singleton, 28, of Pleasant Hill crashed into a vehicle on the city’s east side, then drove away, police said. He allegedly misled co-workers about the details of the accident and was later arrested.

Police said it didn’t appear Singleton had the drugs in his car for legitimate reasons. He was charged with drug possession and a traffic offense.Singleton and the city of Des Moines also are being sued over a 2010 traffic accident.

Police Sgt. Chris Scott said Singleton apparently crashed his vehicle around 1 a.m. Tuesday in the 3800 block of East Ovid Avenue. A neighbor told police he heard a noise and saw a police car at the scene.

Over five hours later, at 6:34 a.m., Singleton told dispatchers he needed help changing a tire in the 2600 block of Dean Avenue — over three miles away. A police supervisor noticed damage on the patrol car that didn’t add up with Singleton’s description of what had happened: The car had two flat tires and some body damage, Scott said.

An officer allegedly spotted marijuana in the car. That prompted a search that turned up meth and drug paraphernalia, police said. Scott said there was no indication Singleton was under the influence of any illegal substance when he was arrested, although a long time had passed since the accident.

Scott did not specify how much meth and marijuana was found, but he said the amounts led police to think the drugs were for personal use, rather than part of an investigation or an arrest.

The investigation was already in progress when the owner of the damaged car from the hit-and-run called police Tuesday morning. Officers examined the damage to both vehicles and concluded that Singleton was involved, Scott said.

He did not have information on where Singleton may have been between the initial accident and his call for service.

Scott said he could not comment on Singleton’s history with the department, which he joined in 2007. He did say that Singleton was known as a “hard worker” among the officers on his shift.

Singleton is charged with possession of marijuana, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia, as well as hit-and-run. He was booked at the Polk County Jail about 4:50 p.m. Tuesday, but he was released at 5:20 p.m. on the condition that he attends court proceedings. No initial court date was available. He was not required to post bond, the Polk County Sheriff‘s Office said.

Police placed Singleton on paid leave pending an investigation. His most recent salary was not available Tuesday.

Polk County court records show a Brandon Singleton the same age as the Des Moines officer was arrested for misdemeanor cocaine possession in 2003 — a charge that Polk County authorities later declined to prosecute in 2004.

Singleton was hired by the Des Moines police department in 2007.

Singleton, and the city of Des Moines, also face a trial in May in a civil lawsuit stemming from a 2010 traffic accident with a woman who was driving past Singleton’s stopped police car. Attorney John Nemminger said Jo Ann Meyer was driving on Southeast 14th Street when Singleton pulled into traffic and struck her vehicle. The incident caused less than $1,000 of damage, Nemminger said, but was fatal to Meyer’s older-model car.

“He seemed like a pretty good guy, frankly,” Nemminger said of the officer. “He was honest and forthright about his part of it.”

Court records show Brandon Singleton, 28, also faces a foreclosure lawsuit on a Pleasant Hill townhome. Records show the homeowners’ association won a small claims judgment against him last September for $2,420 in unpaid fees.

Scott, the police spokesman, declined to release any recordings from Singleton’s vehicle or radio communications, saying they were evidence for the investigation.

He said officials do review the criminal histories of prospective police officers. In the case of past drug use or arrests, Scott said, the department looks at factors including frequency and the length of time that has passed since a person used a drug or was arrested.

While Scott was not aware of Singleton’s 2003 drug arrest, he said that any committee hiring him as an officer would have reviewed the charge.

“I’m sure that the committee that hired him felt that he’d made a bad mistake and he’d learned from it and moved on,” he said.

Scott said he could not remember a similar incident during his 11 years with Des Moines police.

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Iowa City Police Seek Help Solving “Fuck Me Silly” Sex Doll Robbery Case – $1000 To Anyone Who Will Snitch About Theft Of $250 Doll

February 8, 2012

IOWA CITY, IOWA – In a bid to capture the armed robber who last month stole a $250 sex doll from an Iowa City adult store, police today released a surveillance photo showing the suspect making off with the item.

Seen above, the image shows the ski mask-clad man carrying the sex doll inside the Romantix Pleasure Palace shop at around 3 AM on January 12.

Before releasing the store surveillance photo, cops pixelated it to obscure explicit images on the box of the “Fuck Me Silly #1” model “mega masturbator.” As previously reported, the stolen 20-pound sex doll is described by its manufacturer as “the most realistic piece of ass you ever fucked…Slap that big round ass and listen to the whack…it sounds and feels just like a real ass!”

According to police, the robber displayed a large hunting knife to a Romantix employee before leaving with the sex doll (the box for which is seen above). Cops described the suspect as a “white male, approximately 5’8″ – 5’10”, 165 lbs.”

In return for information leading to the man’s arrest, Iowa City Area CrimeStoppers is offering an award of up to $1000.

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Cordova Village Iowa Does Away With Its Disfunctional Police Department

November 19, 2011

CORDOVA VILLAGE, IOWA – The Cordova Village Board voted late Thursday to disband the town’s police force after nearly a year of controversy that has resulted in a wrongful termination lawsuit and criminal charges.

The board voted to override Mayor Bob Vanhooreweghe’s veto of the board’s motion to disband last month. The department will be dissolved Dec. 31.

“When they’re stuck on stupid, there ain’t much you can do about it,” Vanhooreweghe said before the meeting.

Board member Dean Moyer, who voted for the motion to disband, said Thursday the decision was “the right thing to do,” adding the department has “become an unmanageable mess, too many troubles, too many issues.”

As an alternative, the board has suggested contracting with the Rock Island County Sheriff’s Department or sharing Port Byron’s contract with the sheriff’s office.

“We can save money and have a better organization,” Moyer said.

The Cordova Police Department has taken numerous hits this year. In April, then-Chief Todd Allen resigned two days after the mayor fired officer Richard Wallen. Wallen has since filed a lawsuit in Rock Island County against the village, claiming he was illegally let go.

Meanwhile, officer Ray Goossens was arrested in August and charged with one felony count of intimidation. He allegedly intimidated the president of the Cordova Dragway Park, Illinois State Police Master Sgt. Chris Endress said at the time of Goossens’ arrest.

Goossens, whose trial is set for January, faces two to five years in prison if convicted of the Class 3 felony.

Cordova, a town of 672 about 25 miles northeast of the Quad-Cities, used to employ four full-time police officers, including a police chief. Earlier this year, the village board cut full-time hours back to part-time.

Two officers have been on leave for months and the department has been without a police chief since Allen resigned.

The board voted over the summer to attempt to terminate one of the two remaining officers, Ryan Gaines. These days, he’s working only 10 hours a week as an officer at $10.50 an hour, he said.

The council voted Thursday to put Gaines on a four-week suspension.

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Secret Service Agent Daniel L. Valencia Busted For Drunk Driving Ahead Of Obama Iowa Visit

August 17, 2011

DECORAH, IOWA – A Secret Service special agent was arrested and charged with drunk
driving last weekend in Decorah ahead of President Obama’s visit to
Iowa.

Police said Daniel L. Valencia, 40, of Washington, D.C., ran a red
light about 1:30 a.m. Saturday, and an officer pulled him over.

He was alone in the vehicle. Police said his eyes were bloodshot and
watery and he smelled strongly of alcohol. Valencia told a police
officer he had had two drinks that night.

After a field sobriety test, an officer decided Valencia was too
intoxicated to drive. Valencia refused to take a preliminary breath
test, and refused to give a breath sample at the jail. He was then
charged with operating while intoxicated.

He was released from jail Monday, according to court documents.

George Ogilvie, a spokesman for the Secret Service, said the law
enforcement agency is aware of the charges against Valencia and has
turned the matter over to its Office of Professional Responsibility. He
declined to say what Valencia was doing in Decorah.

President Obama visited Decorah on Monday night and spoke in Peosta, just west of Dubuque, on Tuesday.

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Life Saver Crushed While In US Mail System Brings Iowa City Police And An Evacuation

May 21, 2011

IOWA CITY, IOWA – The man who opened the suspicious letter containing a white powder said he believes the sender was “just trying to sell him life insurance.”

Thomas Farnsworth, a criminal defense lawyer at the law office of J. Dean Keagan, 103 College Street, in Iowa City, said he opened the letter Thursday afternoon. Farnsworth said the letter was addressed to him.

“There was tape on it, and it was hand written,” Farnsworth said.

According to Farnsworth he found a white powder inside the envelope. Police later told him that there was a note inside the envelope that read, “Our meeting together could be a lifesaver.”

Police also told Farnsworth that they believe the powder was a crushed lifesaver.

“I don’t think it was malicious,” said Farnsworth. The life saver was likely crushed at the post office when the letter was in transit, Farnsworth said.

Police would not confirm that the white powder was a crushed lifesaver, and said the investigation is ongoing.

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Waterloo Iowa Police Officer Augustin “Gus” Farmer Receives A Slap On The Wrist For Drunk Driving

March 18, 2011

WATERLOO, IOWA – A Waterloo police officer arrested for drunken driving had been given a deferred judgment and probation.

Augustin “Gus” Farmer was arrested in December after being pulled over for speeding by a Black Hawk County sheriff’s deputy.

Farmer was scheduled to go to trial this week on a charge of first-offense operating while intoxicated. The Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier says Farmer pleaded guilty last week and a judge granted him a deferred judgment. That means the conviction will be removed from his record if he successfully completes the probation.

Police say Farmer remains on duty.

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Fort Madison Iowa Police Officer William Bowker Want Unemployment Benefits After Firing For Affair With Chief’s Wife – Previously Caught Drinking And Sleeping On The Job And Had Problems Attending Required Classes

September 15, 2010

FORT MADISON, IOWA – A Fort Madison police officer who was fired for having an affair with the chief’s wife is entitled to unemployment benefits, a state judge has ruled.

Patrol Officer William Bowker was serving on the Lee County Narcotics Task Force in 2008 when he committed several admitted policy violations. State records related to Bowker’s recent request for unemployment benefits indicate that while assigned to the task force he was twice photographed by colleagues while sleeping on duty, consumed alcohol while on call, refused to attend a class about search warrants and complained that another class conflicted with his plans for a Super Bowl party.

As a result, Bowker was removed from the task force in early 2009, but he faced no discipline from the Fort Madison Police Department, where he remained on staff.

In the spring of 2009, Bowker allegedly initiated an extramarital affair with Reserve Officer Christine Niggemeyer, the wife of Police Chief Bruce Niggemeyer. Another officer in the department reported the matter to the chief in June 2009, but when questioned by the chief, Bowker allegedly denied the affair.

The city manager then instructed two of the city’s 18 police officers to investigate the matter. After conducting surveillance of Bowker and collecting video of Bowker and Christine Niggemeyer hugging and kissing, the officers confirmed the affair.

The city then began investigating Bowker’s 2008 conduct on the task force. In February 2009, the city manager fired Bowker, citing the affair and Bowker’s actions with the task force as evidence of misconduct.

In June, the firing was upheld by the city’s Civil Service Commission, although Bowker is currently appealing that decision in Iowa district court.

At a recent public hearing on Bowker’s request for unemployment benefits, Bowker admitted to the affair with the chief’s wife. He also testified that he slept about two times a week while on duty inside the office of the Lee County Drug Task Force.

“There was work I could have been doing,” he acknowledged. “I slept in a chair. … Between having a family life and work, it was a crazy schedule. I would take catnaps.”

Bowker also testified that he used his police computer to manage his baseball and football fantasy league accounts and to visit his MySpace page while on duty. He said he continued to use the computer for personal reasons even after being warned by a supervisor. He said he did so because the supervisor used a police computer to watch videos during work hours.

He also testified that a task force colleague was pulled from the unit for dating a drug suspect’s wife. He acknowledged that while that information was supposed to be kept secret, he shared it with his wife.

In closing arguments, the city’s attorney, Patrick O’Connell, said there was no question Bowker repeatedly committed on-the-job misconduct.

“These are police officers who are our last line of defense in protecting the public, and these officers are supposed to have each other’s backs,” O’Connell said. “This is one of those situations where the intentional misconduct is – well, I don’t know that it could be any more plain.”

Bowker’s attorney, Curtis Dial, disagreed. “Basically this is the just chief pouting and crying because his wife left him for another person and he can’t be an adult about it,” Dial said at the hearing. “There is absolutely no reason he cannot discipline others or be an effective chief simply because his wife is having an affair with Bill Bowker.”

Administrative Law Judge James Timberland ruled that the timing of Bowker’s firing was critical in that there was no recent act of misconduct, which is legally required in cases where unemployment benefits are to be denied.

Timberland noted that Bowker’s misconduct on the task force was known to the chief in January 2009 but resulted in no discipline. The affair was confirmed in August 2009, but Bowker wasn’t fired until February 2010. As such, Bowker is entitled to benefits, Timberland ruled.

Court records indicate the Niggemeyers initiated divorce proceedings in June 2009. A final divorce decree was granted last month. Bowker and his wife initiated divorce proceedings in May 2009, and their marriage was dissolved in November 2009.

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Des Moines Iowa Police Spokeswoman Reassigned After Admitting Black Attacking Whites Were Based On Racial Motivations

September 3, 2010

DES MOINES, IOWA – Des Moines Police Chief Judy Bradshaw reassigned her department’s spokeswoman Thursday, two weeks after Sgt. Lori Lavorato said it was “very possible” fights near the Iowa State Fairgrounds had racial overtones.

The move came as a part of a series of police command assignment changes announced to officers by e-mail Thursday, the details of which have not been made public.

Bradshaw, who could not be reached for comment Thursday, raised concerns about statements Lavorato made after a series of fights outside the fairgrounds last month.

A supplemental report about the Aug. 20 incident filed by Sgt. Dave Murillo said, “On-duty officers at the fairgrounds advise there was a group of 30 to 40 individuals roaming the fairgrounds openly calling it ‘beat whitey night.’ “

While answering questions from the news media three days later, Lavorato said, “It’s all under investigation, but it’s very possible it has racial overtones.”

Police commanders later said they found no credible evidence the fights were racially motivated.

“I had some real concerns with us making that leap and making a remark like that publicly,” Bradshaw told The Des Moines Register in an Aug. 26 interview. “That’s a huge statement that, quite frankly, can provoke emotions on both sides of the issue.

“People are very sensitive to remarks like that, so I had some real grave concerns about us stepping out and I wanted to make certain that we were right to message the State Fair events that way.”

On Thursday, Des Moines police administrators did not return phone calls from the Register seeking comment and did not release a full list of administrative changes at the department. Bradshaw was out of the office and did not return a call to her cell phone. Messages left for Assistant Chiefs James O’Donnell and David Lillard also were not returned.

Lavorato, 36, a police public information officer since May 2009, will work in the department’s traffic unit. Sgt. Jeff Edwards, 40, will transfer from the traffic unit to replace Lavorato effective Sept. 13.

Lavorato confirmed her new assignment, but declined to say whether the move was voluntary.

“For reasons I cannot disclose, I am being transferred,” she said. “There is a series of transfers going on and I am one of the people being moved. I enjoyed being (the public information officer), working with the media and the public and it’s a job I’m going to miss.”

Lavorato said her pay was not affected by the move, but she will lose her take-home unmarked police vehicle and extra compensation she received for being on call seven days a week.

Edwards served as a fill-in for Lavorato during her tenure. He is a 19-year veteran and has been a sergeant since 1999.

A 1988 graduate of Southeast Polk High School, Edwards followed his father, Larry Edwards, into police work. His work credits include time in patrol, robbery/homicide, fraud, narcotics, motor vehicle thefts and the Neighborhood Based Service Delivery unit.

A graduate of Upper Iowa University, Edwards is studying for a master’s degree in public administration at Drake University. He is married with two teenage children.

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Veteran Muscatine Iowa Police Officer, School Resource Officer, And Drug Task Force Member Scott Burk Arrested, Suspended, And Fired For Dealing Cocaine

August 31, 2010

MUSCATINE, IOWA — City officials late this morning fired Muscatine police officer Scott Burk, who remains in custody at the Muscatine County Jail, after initially suspending him with pay.

Burk, 47, was arrested about 3:30 p.m. Saturday at 3016 Lucas St. and charged with having 1.5 ounces of cocaine. His bond has been set at $25,000, according a spokesman at the jail. The spokesman said Burk would have to post $2,500 in order to be released.

Burk — a Muscatine police officer for 14 years who last year was paid $62,456, according to city records — was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, which is a class C felony. He also was charged with a drug-tax stamp violation, which is a class D felony.

If convicted, he could receive maximum sentences of up to 10 years and a $50,000 fine and up to five years and a $7,500 fine on the respective charges.

Details about the investigation, which is being conducted by the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation, were not immediately available.

“These situations are always sad and extremely difficult to deal with, but the reality is that they do happen from time to time. Police officers are human beings and are not immune from suffering the same shortcomings as everyone else,” Muscatine Police Chief Gary Coderoni said this morning in a statement.

“Public trust is difficult to obtain, and easy to lose, which is why we collaborate with an outside agency to make sure that the investigation is conducted fairly and impartially.“

Since November, Burk had been assigned to the overnight shift of the police department’s patrol division, working from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. Previously, he had been the department’s resource officer at Muscatine High School from 2004-08. From November 2008 until his reassignment last year, Burk had been an officer on the Muscatine County Drug Task Force.

The task force is comprised of two detectives from both the Muscatine Police Department and Muscatine County Sheriff’s Office, a secretary provided by the Iowa Division of Narcotics Enforcement and state narcotics agents as needed.

In July, the office of state Auditor David Vaudt released a report that said at least $8,810 in cash and money orders held by the task force during a five-year period could not be accounted for after an audit was requested by the state DCI.

Officials have not linked Burk to the missing funds, and no charges were filed at the time because there was insufficient evidence, according to a spokeswoman for the DCI.

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Dumbass Osceola County Iowa Sheriff Douglas L. Weber Ordered By Federal Judge To Issue Gun Permit, Complete College Level Course In U.S. Constitutuion And Out First Amendment Right To Free Speech

July 8, 2010

PRIMGHAR, IOWA — U.S. District Court Judge Mark W. Bennett has ordered Osceola County Sheriff Douglas L. Weber to issue a gun permit to a resident and to complete a college-level course involving the First Amendment.

Bennett’s written decision on Wednesday involves the case of Paul Dorr, of Ocheyedan, who was denied a permit to carry a concealed weapon.

Dorr and his son, Alexander, were denied gun permits after being engaged in extensive First Amendment activity — protesting, passing out leaflets and writing letters to the editor — the opinion notes.

“The court finds a tsunami, a maelstrom, an avalanche, of direct, uncontroverted evidence in Sheriff Weber’s own testimony to conclude beyond all doubt that he unquestionably violated the First Amendment rights of at least Paul Dorr,” Bennett wrote in his ruling.

Dorr said Wednesday that he was pleased “justice is served. I get my permit back and the sheriff is being sent back to school. The harm done by Sheriff Weber against the 6th and 9th commandments has been made right.”

The elder Dorr had been issued a concealed weapons permit from the late 1990s to 2005. But his July 7, 2007, application for a permit was denied. His son’s was denied a year later, when he was 18 years old.

Weber’s reason for disapproving the application was, “concern from public. Don’t trust him.” The following year Weber also denied Alexander Dorr’s application for a permit and informed Paul Dorr that he would deny any further applications from him.

Weber testified that he had heard people refer to Paul as “a whacko, delusional, a nut job, a spook, and narcissist,” Bennett’s decision noted. “Regardless of the adjective used to describe Paul, however, Sheriff Weber stated that Paul’s ‘lousy’ reputation was due to his political activities of writing letters to the editor and distributing fliers.”

The ruling continued, “Giving Sheriff Weber more deference than is due his elected status, the court finds that Sheriff Weber denied Paul’s application for a concealed weapons permit not because of the content of his First Amendment activity but because it was effective and agitated many members of the local community.”

And, Bennett said, “In denying Paul a concealed weapons permit, Sheriff Weber single-handedly hijacked the First Amendment and nullified its freedoms and protections. Ironically, Sheriff Weber, sworn to uphold the Constitution, in fact retaliated against a citizen of his county who used this important freedom of speech and association precisely in the manner envisioned by the founding members of our nation …

“In doing so, this popularly elected Sheriff, who appears to be a fine man and an excellent law enforcement officer, in all other regards, blatantly caved in to public pressure and opinion and, in doing so, severely trampled the Constitution and Paul’s First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and association. This is a great reminder that the First Amendment protects the sole individual who may be a gadfly, kook, weirdo, nut job, whacko, and spook, with the same force of protection as folks with more majoritarian and popular views.”

However, Bennett’s decision did not favor Dorr’s son, who was 18 years old when he applied for the carry permit, and is 20 now. Bennett noted that sheriffs have the discretion to withhold permits from anyone under majority age.

Bennett required Weber take a class that must be a college-level course on the United States Constitution, “including — at least in part — a discussion of the First Amendment.” And Bennet said, Weber must obtain approval from the court before participating in the class. Upon completion of the class, Weber must also file anan affidavit with the clerk of court showing successful completion with a passing grade.

A request left with the dispatcher at the Osceola County law enforcement center, requesting a return call for comment from Sheriff Weber, was not returned, Wednesday night.

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Iowa State Trooper Targets Family In Car That He Claims Cut Him Off While Driving Governor Home To Mansion

May 19, 2010

WEST DES MOINES, IOWA – State authorities are investigating a traffic stop in West Des Moines involving a state trooper driving Iowa Gov. Chet Culver and another car that allegedly cut off the governor’s SUV.

Three police squad cars responded to aid the state trooper on Sunday afternoon when the driver of a Chrysler Pacifica declined to stop for the trooper’s unmarked GMC Yukon that carried the governor and Culver’s 7-year-old son, John, records show.

Police identified the Pacifica’s driver as Edwin Allen, 32. Allen was traveling with his wife and two children, police said.

“I wasn’t sure what do,” Allen told KCCI-TV. “My wife got scared, my kids were in the back seat crying, saying this crazy guy might have a gun.”

Jessica Lown, a spokeswoman for the Iowa Department of Public Safety, said today: “The trooper believed he was being cut off by another driver and he attempted to make a traffic stop. It’s not a typical law enforcement vehicle so the trooper had some trouble getting the driver pulled over.”

The trooper driving the governor’s SUV, Michael Clyde, turned on flashing lights, Lown said.

Allen told KCCI that the trooper tried to pull in front of the Pacifica and stop in the middle of the Interstate Highway 235.

“I drove around him. He rode the bumper as much as he could,” Allen said.

Allen stopped voluntarily when the first of three West Des Moines squad cars arrived at the scene, at 22nd Street near Interstate Highway 235, said West Des Moines Police Lt. Jeff Miller.

The Pacifica’s driver filed a formal complaint against the trooper on Monday.

Public safety officials said they are now investigating the formal complaint and will interview all parties involved, including Culver.

“We’re investigating whether it was a legitimate stop,” said Lown, the public safety spokeswoman. The complaint is not a public record because it’s a personnel matter, she said.

Both Culver and his son exited the SUV during the incident, which was reported about 1:30 p.m.

“I wouldn’t say there was any immediate danger, that’s not been my impression,” Lown said. “The trooper made a split-second decision. As troopers do, they must make their best decision in a split second.”

Any certified police officer has the authority under Iowa law to make a traffic stop, authorities said.

The Pacifica’s driver did not lead the trooper in a pursuit, but simply continued to drive.

“(Allen) said it was an unmarked vehicle and the driver was in plain clothes and I had my family with me and I wasn’t going to stop,” said Miller, the West Des Moines police spokeman.

Lown said troopers occasionally encounter similar situations when they’re driving unmarked vehicles. It’s reasonable for Iowans to be concerned about their safety, she said.

Miller said if Iowans question whether a vehicle is a legitimate law enforcement vehicle, they can slow down, turn on the flashers and call 911 to report what’s happening.

West Des Moines police responded to provide mutual aid, Miller said.

“We had this incident involving the governor,” he said. “As soon as the incident was under control and nobody was at risk or in harms way we took off.”

Neither West Des Moines police nor the state trooper cited the Pacifica driver for any violation.

It’s not clear whether Culver asked the trooper to pull over the Pacifica driver, or asked the trooper to keep going, or said nothing at all during this incident.

“The governor is out on the campaign trail and so we haven’t spoken this week,” said spokesman James Flansburg. ” Everything is being handled by DPS.”

The governor’s SUV was headed back to Terrace Hill, the governor’s mansion, public safety officials said.

Where the governor was coming from is unclear.

“The supervisor doesn’t know and the trooper involved is on a regularly scheduled day off,” Lown said.

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Iowa State Death Investigator Walker Jay Hodges Arrested, Charged After Pissing In Public And Claiming To Be A Cop

June 1, 2009

DES MOINES, IOWA – A Grimes man faces charges of public intoxication, interference with official acts and impersonating a public official for allegedly drinking too much and telling the police he was a “cop.”

Des Moines police said Walker Jay Hodges, 34, is not a police officer. On an arrest report, police say Hodges is a death investigator with the State of Iowa.
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Officers were sent to the Locust Tap on a report of a fight about 1:45 a.m. Sunday. When they arrived at East Fourth and Locust streets, they approached Hodges. Police said he told them there was no problem.

Officers said he had no shoes. Witnesses said Hodges had been to another business and the owner confronted him about urinating on the steps. There was a fight.

Hodges was described by police as uncooperative. He allegedly told officers their investigation was over. Officers tried to take him into custody on a charge of public intoxication and he allegedly crossed his arms to prevent being handcuffed.

As he tried to pull away, police said, an officer performed a leg sweep and took him to the ground.

Police said that as they finished cuffing him, Hodges said, “I’m a cop. Check my wallet. Check my wallet. I’m a cop.”

The report of the arrest says officers asked him where he worked and he said he was a state investigator.

Officers said it later was determined that he was a state death investigator.

On the way to the police station, Hodges “…kept yelling that we couldn’t do this to him, that we were on the same team,” police said in a report.

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Crazed Iowa DOT Officer Harasses And Searches Law-Abiding Elderly Couple In Motorhome Without Cause

April 1, 2009

IOWA – Carl and Jane Schneider of Fort Madison insist they were treated like criminals by an Iowa Department of Transportation officer during a traffic stop, although nothing improper was found.

The couple were minutes from home Friday night after a 3,600-mile trip in their motor home when a DOT trucking enforcement officer pulled up behind them.

They said the DOT officer interrogated them. Then he ordered them to stand in front of their recreational vehicle’s headlights while he checked inside, searching for marijuana or wads of cash. The officer never asked for their driver’s licenses or proof of registration, they said.
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“It was so strange. I literally felt afraid for my life,” Jane Schneider, 59, said Monday. “I felt I could have bodily harm. … He was very menacing and threatening to us.”

Dena Gray-Fisher, a spokeswoman for the Iowa DOT, said in a statement Monday that “the Iowa DOT’s Office of Motor Vehicle Enforcement takes complaints such as these seriously. That office is in the process of reviewing the matter and will proceed accordingly from the information obtained. The department does not believe it would be appropriate to comment further until that has been done.”

The DOT has a team of officers who enforce compliance statewide with commercial trucking laws.

The Schneiders posted a description of their experience Sunday night on an Internet blog – iowa defense.wordpress.com/2009/03/29/2894 – where it has been generating comments.

Carl Schneider, 66, a well-known Fort Madison resident who formerly operated the Blue Grass Dairy, said Monday that he and his wife remained puzzled. Both said they have had trouble sleeping since the traffic stop.

One of their complaints is that the officer who stopped them repeatedly demonstrated a lack of knowledge about firearms laws, even though they were legally transporting a .40-caliber handgun with a concealed-weapon permit from the Lee County Sheriff’s Department.

Carl Schneider said he was particularly upset that the officer implied he could simply call the sheriff and have the permit revoked, “which is absolutely not the case.”

At one point during the traffic stop, the DOT officer was joined by a second, unidentified officer who was more professional, the couple added.

The traffic stop happened about 8 p.m. Friday on U.S. Highway 61 in Lee County. The Schneiders said they were returning from a two-week vacation to Texas and New Mexico.

The Schneiders said the officer at first asked questions about the unusual shape of their trailer, which was designed to transport a gyrocopter. A gyrocopter looks like a small helicopter, but the rotors self-propel because of the way the air flows through.

One officer also suggested he thought they were carnival workers, they said.

The Schneiders said what was particularly unusual was that the officer who stopped them never asked the couple for their driver’s licenses, vehicle registration or proof of insurance, which are routinely requested.

Carl Schneider said the first officer found nothing improper inside the motor home.

But Schneider said the officer then berated him, saying the handgun wasn’t where Schneider had said he thought it would be. He said the officer was also upset that Schneider had not immediately informed him about the weapon when the traffic stop began.

“My wife was afraid that if I continued to disagree with this officer, the situation would again turn ugly, so she interrupted and we made our goodbyes and headed our way,” Carl Schneider said.

But the officers didn’t leave, he added, until the first officer “had made us feel as if he was somehow doing me a favor by letting us go.”

Appeared Here


Iowa State Police Throw Out Hundreds Of Taxpayers From Public Tax Hearing

April 1, 2009

IOWA  More than 500 people who are upset with a plan to change Iowa’s tax laws were cleared from a hearing tonight at the Iowa House after they interrupted multiple times.

House Speaker Pat Murphy, D-Dubuque, cleared the crowd at about 8:30 p.m. The decision brought about loud protests as the crowd was escorted from the chambers by Iowa State Patrol officers.

“This is the most atrocious thing I’ve seen in the history of the 15 years I’ve been a lobbyist. Pat Murphy has acted like a jack-booted Nazi,” said Ed Failor Jr., president of Iowans for Tax Relief, a conservative taxpayers’ rights group from Muscatine with 50,000 members..

Failor Jr. was escorted from the House chambers after Murphy overheard him speak with the media.

House rules say that no protesting or advocating can be done in the House.

Murphy said he should have ordered the chambers cleared much sooner than he did, since several of the speakers were booed.

“The idea behind the public hearing is to give people public input and allow people the ability to speak for and against the bill. This is not an athletic event,” Murphy said.

After the majority of the public was removed, the scheduled speakers were allowed to continue. The hearing is scheduled to last until about 9:45 p.m.

The proposal, House File 807 and Senate Study Bill 1317, would end a practice known as federal deductibility. That means Iowans could no longer subtract what they pay in federal income taxes from their income when figuring their state taxes.

Ending federal deductibility without changing anything else would mean Iowans would pay an estimated $595 million more in taxes. However, Democrats have proposed a plan that would instead lower the state income tax rates and increase certain tax credits to offset the increase.

Democrats have maintained that two-thirds of Iowans would either see a tax savings or no change at all in their taxes due to the proposal.

Specific numbers show that 49 percent of Iowans who file taxes would get a break in the current tax year, while about 18 percent would see no change.

The remainder – 450,292 people – would see a tax increase, according to the Iowa department of Revenue and Finance.

Appeared Here


Crazed Iowa DOT Officer Harasses And Searches Law-Abiding Elderly Couple In Motorhome Without Cause

April 1, 2009

IOWA – Carl and Jane Schneider of Fort Madison insist they were treated like criminals by an Iowa Department of Transportation officer during a traffic stop, although nothing improper was found.

The couple were minutes from home Friday night after a 3,600-mile trip in their motor home when a DOT trucking enforcement officer pulled up behind them.

They said the DOT officer interrogated them. Then he ordered them to stand in front of their recreational vehicle’s headlights while he checked inside, searching for marijuana or wads of cash. The officer never asked for their driver’s licenses or proof of registration, they said.
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“It was so strange. I literally felt afraid for my life,” Jane Schneider, 59, said Monday. “I felt I could have bodily harm. … He was very menacing and threatening to us.”

Dena Gray-Fisher, a spokeswoman for the Iowa DOT, said in a statement Monday that “the Iowa DOT’s Office of Motor Vehicle Enforcement takes complaints such as these seriously. That office is in the process of reviewing the matter and will proceed accordingly from the information obtained. The department does not believe it would be appropriate to comment further until that has been done.”

The DOT has a team of officers who enforce compliance statewide with commercial trucking laws.

The Schneiders posted a description of their experience Sunday night on an Internet blog – iowa defense.wordpress.com/2009/03/29/2894 – where it has been generating comments.

Carl Schneider, 66, a well-known Fort Madison resident who formerly operated the Blue Grass Dairy, said Monday that he and his wife remained puzzled. Both said they have had trouble sleeping since the traffic stop.

One of their complaints is that the officer who stopped them repeatedly demonstrated a lack of knowledge about firearms laws, even though they were legally transporting a .40-caliber handgun with a concealed-weapon permit from the Lee County Sheriff’s Department.

Carl Schneider said he was particularly upset that the officer implied he could simply call the sheriff and have the permit revoked, “which is absolutely not the case.”

At one point during the traffic stop, the DOT officer was joined by a second, unidentified officer who was more professional, the couple added.

The traffic stop happened about 8 p.m. Friday on U.S. Highway 61 in Lee County. The Schneiders said they were returning from a two-week vacation to Texas and New Mexico.

The Schneiders said the officer at first asked questions about the unusual shape of their trailer, which was designed to transport a gyrocopter. A gyrocopter looks like a small helicopter, but the rotors self-propel because of the way the air flows through.

One officer also suggested he thought they were carnival workers, they said.

The Schneiders said what was particularly unusual was that the officer who stopped them never asked the couple for their driver’s licenses, vehicle registration or proof of insurance, which are routinely requested.

Carl Schneider said the first officer found nothing improper inside the motor home.

But Schneider said the officer then berated him, saying the handgun wasn’t where Schneider had said he thought it would be. He said the officer was also upset that Schneider had not immediately informed him about the weapon when the traffic stop began.

“My wife was afraid that if I continued to disagree with this officer, the situation would again turn ugly, so she interrupted and we made our goodbyes and headed our way,” Carl Schneider said.

But the officers didn’t leave, he added, until the first officer “had made us feel as if he was somehow doing me a favor by letting us go.”

Appeared Here


Iowa State Police Throw Out Hundreds Of Taxpayers From Public Tax Hearing

April 1, 2009

IOWA  More than 500 people who are upset with a plan to change Iowa’s tax laws were cleared from a hearing tonight at the Iowa House after they interrupted multiple times.

House Speaker Pat Murphy, D-Dubuque, cleared the crowd at about 8:30 p.m. The decision brought about loud protests as the crowd was escorted from the chambers by Iowa State Patrol officers.

“This is the most atrocious thing I’ve seen in the history of the 15 years I’ve been a lobbyist. Pat Murphy has acted like a jack-booted Nazi,” said Ed Failor Jr., president of Iowans for Tax Relief, a conservative taxpayers’ rights group from Muscatine with 50,000 members..

Failor Jr. was escorted from the House chambers after Murphy overheard him speak with the media.

House rules say that no protesting or advocating can be done in the House.

Murphy said he should have ordered the chambers cleared much sooner than he did, since several of the speakers were booed.

“The idea behind the public hearing is to give people public input and allow people the ability to speak for and against the bill. This is not an athletic event,” Murphy said.

After the majority of the public was removed, the scheduled speakers were allowed to continue. The hearing is scheduled to last until about 9:45 p.m.

The proposal, House File 807 and Senate Study Bill 1317, would end a practice known as federal deductibility. That means Iowans could no longer subtract what they pay in federal income taxes from their income when figuring their state taxes.

Ending federal deductibility without changing anything else would mean Iowans would pay an estimated $595 million more in taxes. However, Democrats have proposed a plan that would instead lower the state income tax rates and increase certain tax credits to offset the increase.

Democrats have maintained that two-thirds of Iowans would either see a tax savings or no change at all in their taxes due to the proposal.

Specific numbers show that 49 percent of Iowans who file taxes would get a break in the current tax year, while about 18 percent would see no change.

The remainder – 450,292 people – would see a tax increase, according to the Iowa department of Revenue and Finance.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Iowa City Police Officer Sgt. Sid Jackson Arrested, Charged With Drunk Driving – Tracks In Snow Proved He Is A Liar

February 24, 2009

IOWA CITY, IOWA – An Iowa City Police sergeant was arrested early Saturday by the University of Iowa Department of Public Safety after allegedly driving drunk.

Sgt. Sid Jackson faces charges of drunken driving and interference with official acts.

Police Chief Sam Hargadine said Jackson was off duty at the time of his arrest.

Hargadine said an Iowa City Police on-duty officer was the first one to come across Jackson. The officer requested assistance and University of Iowa Department of Public Safety officers arrived. The University of Iowa officers made the arrest, he said.

According to the Department of Public Safety complaints, an officer observed Jackson sitting in his vehicle with the door open at the intersection of Iowa and Muscatine avenues at 3:54 a.m. Saturday.

Jackson denied driving but admitted he had been drinking, according to the complaints. There were tracks in the fresh snow leading from the front and rear tires, according to the complaints.

According to the complaints, Jackson walked away from the officer and refused to cooperate with testing. He also refused to get in the patrol vehicle and pulled away from officers as he was being placed in handcuffs, according to the complaints.

Jackson was injured during the incident, according to the complaints.

Two calls to a home phone number listed online for Jackson were not answered Saturday night.

Jackson is one of three late-night watch commanders who work 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. for the Iowa City Police department, according to the Iowa City Police Web site.

“He is on administrative leave” pending the outcome of the internal affairs investigation, Hargadine said.

The University of Iowa Department of Public Safety will investigate the criminal matter, and when Iowa City Police receive the paperwork Monday, the internal affairs team will open an independent investigation, Hargadine said.

Hargadine said Jackson is a 20-plus year veteran of the Iowa City Police department.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Iowa City Police Officer Sgt. Sid Jackson Arrested, Charged With Drunk Driving – Tracks In Snow Proved He Is A Liar

February 24, 2009

IOWA CITY, IOWA – An Iowa City Police sergeant was arrested early Saturday by the University of Iowa Department of Public Safety after allegedly driving drunk.

Sgt. Sid Jackson faces charges of drunken driving and interference with official acts.

Police Chief Sam Hargadine said Jackson was off duty at the time of his arrest.

Hargadine said an Iowa City Police on-duty officer was the first one to come across Jackson. The officer requested assistance and University of Iowa Department of Public Safety officers arrived. The University of Iowa officers made the arrest, he said.

According to the Department of Public Safety complaints, an officer observed Jackson sitting in his vehicle with the door open at the intersection of Iowa and Muscatine avenues at 3:54 a.m. Saturday.

Jackson denied driving but admitted he had been drinking, according to the complaints. There were tracks in the fresh snow leading from the front and rear tires, according to the complaints.

According to the complaints, Jackson walked away from the officer and refused to cooperate with testing. He also refused to get in the patrol vehicle and pulled away from officers as he was being placed in handcuffs, according to the complaints.

Jackson was injured during the incident, according to the complaints.

Two calls to a home phone number listed online for Jackson were not answered Saturday night.

Jackson is one of three late-night watch commanders who work 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. for the Iowa City Police department, according to the Iowa City Police Web site.

“He is on administrative leave” pending the outcome of the internal affairs investigation, Hargadine said.

The University of Iowa Department of Public Safety will investigate the criminal matter, and when Iowa City Police receive the paperwork Monday, the internal affairs team will open an independent investigation, Hargadine said.

Hargadine said Jackson is a 20-plus year veteran of the Iowa City Police department.

Appeared Here


Crazed Des Moines County Iowa Want To Charge Jail Inmates For Toilet Paper To Wipe Away $1.7 Million Deficit

February 14, 2009

DES MOINES, IOWA – County budgets and toilet paper have one thing in common: Every little bit helps.

That’s why leaders in Des Moines County will consider an idea to charge jail inmates for bathroom tissue to help wipe away a $1.7 million deficit next year.

The decision was driven, in part, by a Board of Supervisors edict that gave department heads an option: Cut costs or face employee furloughs or layoffs.
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The county’s budget director, Cheryl McVey, said billing inmates for toilet paper could save more than $2,300.

“We have to find out if it’s an allowable expense,” she said Thursday. “It’s certainly not going to balance our budget.”

McVey said she didn’t know whether inmates would be charged by the sheet, square or roll. The savings estimate was provided by the maintenance department at the jail, where officials did not want to talk about the idea or where it originated.

Curt Braby, Louisa County sheriff and president of the Iowa State Sheriffs and Deputies Association, said he wasn’t aware of any counties that have toilet paper fees on the books. He said inmates probably would choose to spend money from accounts established for necessities like shampoo and soap if asked to pony up for paper.

As for Des Moines County elected officials: “They’ve got budget problems, and they’re looking for places to cut. But what do you do for the guy who hasn’t got the dollar for the toilet paper?”

Appeared Here


Crazed Des Moines County Iowa Want To Charge Jail Inmates For Toilet Paper To Wipe Away $1.7 Million Deficit

February 13, 2009

DES MOINES, IOWA – County budgets and toilet paper have one thing in common: Every little bit helps.

That’s why leaders in Des Moines County will consider an idea to charge jail inmates for bathroom tissue to help wipe away a $1.7 million deficit next year.

The decision was driven, in part, by a Board of Supervisors edict that gave department heads an option: Cut costs or face employee furloughs or layoffs.
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The county’s budget director, Cheryl McVey, said billing inmates for toilet paper could save more than $2,300.

“We have to find out if it’s an allowable expense,” she said Thursday. “It’s certainly not going to balance our budget.”

McVey said she didn’t know whether inmates would be charged by the sheet, square or roll. The savings estimate was provided by the maintenance department at the jail, where officials did not want to talk about the idea or where it originated.

Curt Braby, Louisa County sheriff and president of the Iowa State Sheriffs and Deputies Association, said he wasn’t aware of any counties that have toilet paper fees on the books. He said inmates probably would choose to spend money from accounts established for necessities like shampoo and soap if asked to pony up for paper.

As for Des Moines County elected officials: “They’ve got budget problems, and they’re looking for places to cut. But what do you do for the guy who hasn’t got the dollar for the toilet paper?”

Appeared Here


Out Tax Dollars At Work: Des Moines Iowa Hazmat Team Discovers Salt In Campbell’s Soup

February 11, 2009

DES MOINES, IOWA – A Des Moines woman found a suspicious substance in a can of Campbell’s Soup on Tuesday and the fire department sent out a hazardous materials crew.

Des Moines fire inspector Ted Jefferson said the substance in the can was not hazardous but it certainly surprised the homeowner and the hazardous materials team.

“It was salt,” said Jefferson. “It wasn’t supposed to reach retail shelves.”
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Police took a report from Tama Jepsen in the 3100 block of Southwest Fifth St. at about 3:30 p.m. Tuesday.

A police report said she found an unknown substance in the can.

“It was a test can for the soup company,” said Jefferson.”It’s for quality assurance purposes. The test can apparently signals machines to change the product it is canning. But somehow it got in with the rest of the cans.”

Jepsen declined comment. The police report did not specify the flavor of soup.

Appeared Here


Out Tax Dollars At Work: Des Moines Iowa Hazmat Team Discovers Salt In Campbell’s Soup

February 11, 2009

DES MOINES, IOWA – A Des Moines woman found a suspicious substance in a can of Campbell’s Soup on Tuesday and the fire department sent out a hazardous materials crew.

Des Moines fire inspector Ted Jefferson said the substance in the can was not hazardous but it certainly surprised the homeowner and the hazardous materials team.

“It was salt,” said Jefferson. “It wasn’t supposed to reach retail shelves.”
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Police took a report from Tama Jepsen in the 3100 block of Southwest Fifth St. at about 3:30 p.m. Tuesday.

A police report said she found an unknown substance in the can.

“It was a test can for the soup company,” said Jefferson.”It’s for quality assurance purposes. The test can apparently signals machines to change the product it is canning. But somehow it got in with the rest of the cans.”

Jepsen declined comment. The police report did not specify the flavor of soup.

Appeared Here