Lake Oswego Oregon Police Officer’s Motorcycle Burst Into Flames During Traffic Stop – Stumped “Investigators” Think Gas In Tank “Contributed To The Rapid Flame Spread”

October 9, 2012

LAKE OSWEGO, OREGON – A Lake Oswego Police motor bike officer was on a traffic stop at the intersection of McVey Ave and Laurel St in Lake Oswego when he heard a strange noise from his motor bike.

When he looked over to the bike, he noticed flames coming from the front of the bike. He immediately reacted by grabbing as much as he could from the bike including the radar gun and saddle bags.

Those were the only items he was able to recover as the fire grew rapidly.

Lake Oswego firefighters arrived within 2 minutes of being alerted but the bike was completely engulfed in flames.

Investigators have not determined an exact cause but believe the fuel in the gas tank contributed to the rapid flame spread making the bike a total loss.

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Dumbass Veteran Portland Oregon Police Officer John Hurlman Sends Texts Critical Of US DOJ To All Other Officers After Feds Investigate Their Abuse Of The Mentally Ill – “This Is The Same DOJ Or People Who Created Waco And Ruby Ridge.”

September 15, 2012

PORTLAND, OREGON – Portland Police Officer John Hurlman was seated in his patrol car Thursday morning, listening to a local radio station’s coverage of a news conference at police headquarters. Federal justice department officials were about to unveil their findings after more than a yearlong review of Portland police use of force.

Hurlman sent a text message out to all officers on the patrol car’s mobile computer, alerting them to tune in.

Shortly after the U.S. Attorney Amanda Marshall started to speak, another officer texted the news back to all: the U.S. Department of Justice had found that Portland police engage in a pattern and practice of excessive force against people suffering from mental illness.

Annoyed by the outcome, Hurlman said he typed back something like, “This is the same DOJ or people who created Waco and Ruby Ridge.”

The North Precinct officer was referring to two of the biggest federal law enforcement fiascoes in recent memory: the disastrous 1993 federal raid on the Branch Davidian compound at Waco, Texas. The other, the tragic 1992 encounter between the FBI and a band of white separatists at Ruby Ridge, Idaho.

Hurlman said he thought he had just responded to one officer but soon learned his message had popped up on all patrol officers’ mobile computers.

“It was kind of a knee-jerk reaction,” said the 21-year Portland police veteran. “In the current political climate, it wasn’t appropriate. On second-thought, I probably shouldn’t have done it.”

Yet Hurlman doesn’t hide his anger with the Justice Department’s ruling regarding Portland police.

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Continuing coverage of the U.S. Department of Justice inquiry into the Portland Police Bureau.
“I was really annoyed at that moment, and, in fact, I think it’s nonsense,” he said Friday of the federal review. “Quite frankly, we’re being judged by people who don’t have much law enforcement experience.”

Hurlman said he was one of the original Portland officers to volunteer for crisis intervention training, before it became mandatory for all officers.

“We all know the lengths we go to to try to defuse these situations peacefully,” he said. “Nobody wants to go out and harm someone who is mentally ill.”

North Precinct Cmdr. Mike Leloff soon learned of the patrolwide message and called Hurlman into his office for a stern talk. Hurlman said Leloff appropriately, “chewed him out.”

As a result, Hurlman later Thursday texted an apology to all on his patrol car’s mobile computer.

He said it read something like this: “To those who received my earlier message, my remarks were unprofessional and insensitive. I apologize to anyone who received it.”

Portland Lt. Robert King said Friday, “The issue was addressed immediately by the Command Staff and the matter has been dealt with appropriately.”

Hurlman was back on patrol Friday, responding to emergency calls at North Precinct. He said he was advised to be careful about what he says and remain respectful.

A day after the federal report was made public, Hurlman added Friday, “People here are frustrated, to put it mildly.”

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Veteran Sweet Home Oregon Police Officer Randy Gill Arrested And Charged With Stealing Money From Police Union – Quit After Arrest

August 31, 2012

SWEET HOME, OREGON — A former Sweet Home policeman has been arrested for allegedly misappropriating funds from the union that represents local dispatchers and officers.

Randy Gill, 32, was contacted by Klamath County Sheriff’s Office on Aug. 17, and taken into custody based on a warrant, said Sgt. Steve Dorn, of Albany Police Department.

He was arrested on charges of three counts of second-degree theft, official misconduct and third-degree theft, Dorn added.

The warrant had been issued July 27. Klamath County Sheriff’s Office wasn’t immediately available to comment on the arrest Wednesday.

In October, Sweet Home Police Department officers came to the Chief Bob Burford with concerns there may have been a misappropriation of local union funds.

“Something looked wrong,” Burford said. “I immediately asked Albany Police Department if they would conduct the investigation into that.”

That same day, Gill resigned from the police department, Burford said. Gill had been a Sweet Home officer for about seven years.

Paige Clarkson, Marion County deputy district attorney, will prosecute the case so the Linn County District Attorney’s Office can avoid any potential conflict of interest.

“It will be handled in Linn County. There’s no change of venue,” Clarkson said.

Second-degree theft, a Class A misdemeanor, applies to thefts of greater than $100 and less than $1,000. Official misconduct also is a Class A misdemeanor, Clarkson said.

Burford said it is always a disappointment when a police officer fails to live up to their oath of office.

“This is a first for Sweet Home to my knowledge,” Burford said. “And hopefully the last.”

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Portland Oregon Police Close Bridge, Harass And Detain 13 Innocent Men With Beards Who Were En Route To Photo Shoot To Raise Money For Breast Cancer

August 30, 2012

PORTLAND, OREGON – Police in Portland, Ore., say they temporarily closed a downtown bridge and questioned 13 bearded men after receiving a report of someone with an assault rifle.

The men told police and KATU-TV they were crossing the Burnside Bridge on Wednesday evening en route to a photo shoot to raise money for breast cancer research. They said the photo was going to be part of a “Beards for Breasts” calendar.

Police Lt. Robert King says the 13 were wearing military-style clothing and all told the same story. The spokesman says two men carrying the unloaded assault rifle on the bridge were arrested for investigation of disorderly conduct. He says they’re accused of causing public alarm. The other 11 were interviewed and sent on their way.

The men tell KATU they planned to have their photo taken under the “Portland, Oregon” sign near the bridge.

The bridge was closed for about 45 minutes.

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Man In Jail For 30 Days With $1,500+ Fine After Nutcase Oregon Officals Charged And Convicted Him Of Collecting Rainwater On His Private Property

August 9, 2012

MEDFORD, OREGON – Gary Harrington, the Oregon man convicted of collecting rainwater and snow runoff on his rural property surrendered Wednesday morning to begin serving his 30-day, jail sentence in Medford, Ore.

“I’m sacrificing my liberty so we can stand up as a country and stand for our liberty,” Harrington told a small crowd of people gathered outside of the Jackson County (Ore.) Jail.

Several people held signs that showed support for Harrington as he was taken inside the jail.

Harrington was found guilty two weeks ago of breaking a 1925 law for having, what state water managers called “three illegal reservoirs” on his property. He was convicted of nine misdemeanors, sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined over $1500 for collecting rainwater and snow runoff on his property.

The Oregon Water Resources Department, claims that Harrington has been violating the state’s water use law by diverting water from streams running into the Big Butte River.

But Harrington says he is not diverting the state’s water — merely collecting rainwater and snow melt that falls or flows on his own property.

Harrington has vowed to continue to fight the penalty, stating that the government has become “big bullies” and that “from here on in, I’m going to fight it.”

“They’ve just gotten to be big bullies and if you just lay over and die and give up, that just makes them bigger bullies, Harrington said in an interview two weeks ago with CNSNews.com.

“We as Americans, we need to stand on our constitutional rights, on our rights as citizens and hang tough. This is a good country, we’ll prevail,” he said.

His release is expected in early September.

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Umatilla Oregon Teacher Kristle Vandever Not Charged After Sex With Young Boys “…Because Of Luck… No Witnesses Coming Forward.”

August 5, 2012

UMATILLA, OREGON – An elementary school teacher who admitted having sexual relations with students has escaped prison after prosecutors declined to bring charges against her.

Kristle Vandever, 44, resigned two years ago after the allegations first emerged – but she has only just had her teaching licence revoked.

Shortly after quitting, the 21-year veteran wrote an email admitting: ‘I just can’t help wanting these hot young boys… and they want me.’

She also appeared to imply that she could have faced legal action if her victims had spoken up as she wrote, ‘no witnesses coming forward’.

Vandever taught English as a second language at McNary Heights Elementary School in Umatilla, Oregon, having qualified as a teacher in 1989, according to the Hermiston Herald.

After an investigation into allegations she had had sex with students was launched in early 2010, she resigned from the school in May 2010.

Just weeks after her resignation, she sent an email from her work account saying: ‘No jail for me and that is only because of luck… no witnesses coming forward.

‘He said he was of legal age, but he lied. I just can’t help wanting these hot young boys… and they want me.

‘Who am I to spoil a young man’s fantasy. Damn.’

However, after a lengthy police investigation, the local District Attorney declined to file criminal charges against Vandever.

A report concluded that she had performed oral sex on ‘one or more’ students in her car, as well as giving students alcohol.

It also found that video of Vandever engaged in sexual activity with a boy was filmed on a cell phone and passed round other students.

Last month, the teacher had her licence withdrawn as a result of the findings.

She did not appeal against the revocation or the conclusions of the report.

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Crazed Jackson County Oregon Circuit Judge Sentences Man To 30 Days In Jail And Over $1,500 In Fines For Collecting Rainwater On His Own Property

July 27, 2012

EAGLE POINT, OREGON – A rural Oregon man was sentenced Wednesday to 30 days in jail and over $1,500 in fines because he had three reservoirs on his property to collect and use rainwater.

Gary Harrington of Eagle Point, Ore., says he plans to appeal his conviction in Jackson County (Ore.) Circuit Court on nine misdemeanor charges under a 1925 law for having what state water managers called “three illegal reservoirs” on his property – and for filling the reservoirs with rainwater and snow runoff.

“The government is bullying,” Harrington told CNSNews.com in an interview Thursday.

“They’ve just gotten to be big bullies and if you just lay over and die and give up, that just makes them bigger bullies. So, we as Americans, we need to stand on our constitutional rights, on our rights as citizens and hang tough. This is a good country, we’ll prevail,” he said.

The court has given Harrington two weeks to report to the Jackson County Jail to begin serving his sentence.

Harrington said the case first began in 2002, when state water managers told him there were complaints about the three “reservoirs” – ponds – on his more than 170 acres of land.

According to Oregon water laws, all water is publicly owned. Therefore, anyone who wants to store any type of water on their property must first obtain a permit from state water managers.

Harrington said he applied for three permits to legally house reservoirs for storm and snow water runoff on his property. One of the “reservoirs” had been on his property for 37 years, he said.

Though the state Water Resources Department initially approved his permits in 2003, the state – and a state court — ultimately reversed the decision.

“They issued me my permits. I had my permits in hand and they retracted them just arbitrarily, basically. They took them back and said ‘No, you can’t have them,’ so I’ve been fighting it ever since,” Harrington told CNSNews.com.

The case, he said, is centered on a 1925 law which states that the city of Medford holds exclusive rights to “all core sources of water” in the Big Butte Creek watershed and its tributaries.

“Way back in 1925 the city of Medford got a unique withdrawal that withdrew all — supposedly all — the water out of a single basin and supposedly for the benefit of the city of Medford,” Harrington told CNSNews.com.

Harrington told CNSNews.com, however, that the 1925 law doesn’t mention anything about colleting rainwater or snow melt — and he believes that he has been falsely accused.

“The withdrawal said the stream and its tributaries. It didn’t mention anything about rainwater and it didn’t mention anything about snow melt and it didn’t mention anything about diffused water, but yet now, they’re trying to expand that to include that rain water and they’re using me as the goat to do it,” Harrington

But Tom Paul, administrator of the Oregon Water Resources Department, claims that Harrington has been violating the state’s water use law by diverting water from streams running into the Big Butte River.

“The law that he is actually violating is not the 1925 provision, but it’s Oregon law that says all of the water in the state of Oregon is public water and if you want to use that water, either to divert it or to store it, you have to acquire a water right from the state of Oregon before doing that activity,” Paul told CNSNews.com.

Yet Paul admitted the 1925 law does apply because, he said, Harrington constructed dams to block a tributary to the Big Butte, which Medford uses for its water supply.

“There are dams across channels, water channels where the water would normally flow if it were not for the dam and so those dams are stopping the water from flowing in the channel and storing it- holding it so it cannot flow downstream,” Paul told CNSNews.com.

Harrington, however, argued in court that that he is not diverting water from Big Butte Creek, but the dams capturing the rainwater and snow runoff – or “diffused water” – are on his own property and that therefore the runoff does not fall under the jurisdiction of the state water managers, nor does it not violate the 1925 act.

In 2007, a Jackson County Circuit Court judge denied Harrington’s permits and found that he had illegally “withdrawn the water at issue from appropriation other than for the City of Medford.”

According to Paul, Harrington entered a guilty plea at the time, received three years probation and was ordered to open up the water gates.

“A very short period of time following the expiration of his probation, he once again closed the gates and re-filled the reservoirs,” Paul told CNSNews.com. “So, this has been going on for some time and I think frankly the court felt that Mr. Harrington was not getting the message and decided that they’d already given him probation once and required him to open the gates and he refilled his reservoirs and it was business as usual for him, so I think the court wanted — it felt it needed — to give a stiffer penalty to get Mr. Harrington’s attention.”

In two weeks, if unsuccessful in his appeals, Harrington told CNSNews.com that he will report to the Jackson County Jail to serve his sentence.

“I follow the rules. If I’m mandated to report, I’m going to report. Of course, I’m going to do what it takes in the meantime to prevent that, but if I’m not successful, I’ll be there,” Harrington said.

But Harrington also said that he will never stop fighting the government on this issue.

“When something is wrong, you just, as an American citizen, you have to put your foot down and say, ‘This is wrong; you just can’t take away anymore of my rights and from here on in, I’m going to fight it.”

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Savage Black Beast Broke Into Eugene Oregon Homes To View Internet Pornography

July 20, 2012

EUGENE, OREGON – Police say a 21-year-old Oregon man broke into homes to look at pornography on the Internet, sometimes while the homeowners were inside.

Eugene police said Thursday they arrested Antone Forrest Deedward Owens on charges of burglary, menacing and coercion. Authorities say he broke into at least three homes since last September, sometimes entering the same home on multiple occasions.

In one home, a resident’s son told police he awoke to find someone in his bedroom. In another case, a woman came home to find pornography on her computer screen, along with lubricant, towels and a cell phone nearby. She spotted the man outside, and she said he threatened her before taking the phone and lubricant and fleeing.

Police want to hear from anyone who’s experienced similar circumstances.

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Multnomah County Oregon Judge Finds Man Not Guilty After Free-Speech Protest Against TSA Thugs – Stripped Naked At Portland International Airport

July 19, 2012

PORTLAND, OREGON – Portland is buffing its image as Naked City USA with the latest nudity case to grab national headlines.

Already, Oregon’s most populous city is home to one of the largest annual World Naked Bike Rides on the planet, with as many as 10,000 free-wheeling souls participating this past June.

Then there was the 21-year-old Portland man who was so inspired by the car-free movement in 2008 that he rode his bike in protest through the Alberta Arts District sans clothes. Portland police took him to the ground and booked him into jail, only to have a judge gain national attention by throwing out the case.

Perhaps it’s natural then that a Multnomah County judge Wednesday acquitted 50-year-old John E. Brennan of an indecent exposure charge after he stripped naked at Portland International Airport.

Brennan’s friends packed into the courtroom and erupted in applause and cheers upon hearing the verdict. As they filed into the hallway, they heartily embraced a smiling Brennan.

One friend stuck a sticky note on Brennan’s chest. It read: “Sir Godiva” — a reference to the legend of a noblewoman who rode naked on a horse through the streets of England to protest oppressive taxation.

Brennan famously shed all his clothes April 17 at an airport security checkpoint. It was 5:30 p.m. and gawkers didn’t hesitate to take smart phone photos and offer them up to the media as Brennan stood for about five minutes before police arrived.

During a two-hour trial, Brennan testified that he undressed because he was fed up with what he sees as invasive Transportation Security Administration procedures — including body scans and pat downs.

Prosecutors charged Brennan with violating a city ordinance that forbids people from exposing their genitalia in public and in the presence of the opposite sex.

The judge sided with the defense, which cited a 1985 Oregon Court of Appeals ruling stating that nudity laws don’t apply in cases of protest.

“It is the speech itself that the state is seeking to punish, and that it cannot do,” Circuit Judge David Rees said.

Once again, the news quickly spread far and wide: USA Today, the Los Angeles Times and CNN were among websites featuring the story in their feeds.

Judge acquits John Brennan on indecent exposure charge Judge acquits John Brennan on indecent exposure charge To protest TSA practices last April, John Brennan of Portland stripped down naked at a Portland International Airport checkpoint and was arrested. Judge David Rees found him not guilty. Watch video

Brennan, a high-tech consultant, showed up to court wearing a baby-blue button-up shirt and chocolate-colored slacks. He testified that he was starting a business trip to San Jose, Calif., when he declined to step into one of the TSA’s body scanners. Screeners then asked him to step through a metal detector and submit to a pat down.

The screener tested his gloves used in the pat down, and a machine indicated the presence of nitrates, presumably picked up from Brennan’s clothes.

Brennan said it was then he knew he was in trouble — not because he was part of any sinister plot to blow up a plane, but because he would have to wait a long time for TSA to sort out the mix-up and he could get to his gate.

Brennan then calmly disrobed — a convenient way to show the TSA that he wasn’t carrying any explosives, he said.

“I also was aware of the irony of taking off my clothes to protect my privacy,” he said.

Brennan said he told authorities that he was doing so in protest, although a screener and a Port of Portland police officer testified it wasn’t until police arrived that Brennan made that claim.

Brennan said he wanted to show the TSA “that I know my rights. That you have these machines that can see us naked. … They’re getting as close to seeing us naked as they can. And we are upping the ante.”

Deputy District Attorney Joel Petersen argued that Brennan only spoke of a protest minutes later. Petersen urged the judge to recognize that distinction, “otherwise any other person who is ever naked will be able to state after the fact” that it was done in protest.

The city ordinance states that the crime is a misdemeanor. Prosecutors decided to downgrade Brennan’s criminal charge to a violation, similar to a traffic ticket. If he had been convicted, he likely would have had to pay a fine.

In Portland, the verdict seems in keeping with the city’s posture as a bastion of free expression. After all, one of former Mayor Bud Clark’s claims to fame was his “Expose Yourself to Art” poster that showed him from behind — pantsless with his trench coat open wide.

In recent years, Portland police have taken a reserved approach when they encounter residents in the nude.

They receive 9-1-1 calls about naked people in public “off and on” and especially in the summer, said Sgt. Pete Simpson. Police will use nudity laws to pursue charges against people caught urinating or defecating in public, or having sex in cars, on lawns or in full view of others.

But how about those who are naked for the sheer sake of being naked?

“We don’t necessarily encourage people to be naked in public, but generally speaking …being nude in public is not enough to go to jail,” Simpson said. “You’ve got to be doing something more.”

Case-in-point, each year officers look the other way when thousands fill the streets for the World Naked Bike Ride, he said, “because of the sheer number of naked people.”

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Large Pack Of Savage Black Beasts Target Troutdale Oregon Grocery Store, Terrorizing Employees, Trashing Store, And Stealing And Destroying Merchandise

July 17, 2012

TROUTDALE, OREGON — A flash rob group of teens targeted a Troutdale store last weekend and investigators are trying to identify the suspects.

Investigators said as many as 40 kids entered the Albertsons store at 25691 SE Stark Street at the same time late Saturday night and started stealing things.

Raw video: Flash robbery

Security officers chased the thieves out, but no one was captured. They also left employees pretty shaken up, including one woman who was in tears after getting terrorized by the robbers.

Investigators have not said exactly how many items were taken.

“Basically it looks like they went in, just to cause chaos, which they accomplished,” said Sgt. Steve Bevens with the Troutdale Police Department.

Investigators believe the suspects ranged in age from 13 to 15. They could be seen on surveillance video, roaming from aisle to aisle.

Customers said the store employees were overwhelmed and outnumbered.

“They [thieves] were bragging and laughing about how much stuff they stole and what they did in the store,” one witness told KGW.

If caught, the suspects could face several charges including rioting, disorderly conduct and criminal mischief.

This was one of several flash rob-style robberies being investigated in the Portland Metro area over past months.

The robbers emulate the popular and peaceful flash mob gatherings now common throughout the world. Instead of synchronzied entertainment, those in a flash rob use a large gathering as a source of distraction as they commit a crime.

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Shortages Of Common Drugs Force Oregon Paramedics To Stock And Use Expired Medications On Emergency Patients

July 16, 2012

SALEM, OREGON – When paramedics ran out of a critical drug used to treat irregular heartbeats, the Bend Fire Department in Central Oregon dug into its stash of expired medications, loaded up the trucks and kept treating patients.

Paramedics reported asking some of those facing medical emergencies: “Is it OK if we use this expired drug?”

Emergency responders in various jurisdictions have reported turning to last resort practices as they struggle to deal with a shortage of drug supplies created by manufacturing delays and industry changes. Some are injecting expired medications or substituting alternatives. Others are simply going without.

As the drug crisis mounted for the Bend Fire Department earlier this year, the agency had 11 medications in its drug kits that were expired, despite risks that the pharmaceuticals might not work as intended in life-or-death situations. The crisis has eased a bit, but the agency still carries expired doses of two drugs in serving a city of 80,000 people.

“We’ve never (before) had to go diving back into the bin to try to retrieve expired boxes of drugs,” said Tom Wright, emergency medical services coordinator for the Bend Fire Department, which has been administering outdated medicines for about a year. “We had the backing of our insurance company that giving expired drugs is better than giving no drugs at all.”

He said that medics have not reported any adverse reactions.

Medications are only guaranteed to work as intended until their expiration date. When stored properly, most expired drugs won’t be harmful to patients but will become less effective with time, according to medical professionals. However, EMS officials said it’s often difficult to get information from manufacturers or regulators about how long specific medications will work.

The University of Utah’s Drug Information Service reports 275 medications are in short supply. Clinics and hospitals have reported struggles getting chemotherapy drugs to treat cancer and anesthetics used in surgery.

In the past two years, paramedics from different agencies have dealt with shortages of critical first-line drugs like Valium to treat seizures, dextrose 50 to boost the blood sugar of diabetics and magnesium sulfate for eclampsia, an attack of convulsions during pregnancy. They’ve run low on painkillers and sedation drugs.

Right now, EMS directors say they’re keeping a nervous eye on their supplies of epinephrine, for heart attacks and allergic reactions, and morphine, a painkiller.

Most of the shortages affecting emergency responders are of injectable generic medications. Drug manufacturers and the Food and Drug Administration say they’re working aggressively to track and prevent shortages, but it could take years to get supplies back to normal levels.

“Drug shortages are not a new phenomenon,” said Dave Gaugh, senior vice president for regulatory sciences at the Generic Pharmaceutical Association. “What’s new is the crisis level they’re at today.”

It was good fortune that no one around Mayer, Ariz., called 911 to report a seizure during the three weeks this year that the local fire district had no drugs to treat the condition.

“Without the medication they could actually die from the seizure,” said Paul Coe, EMS coordinator for the Mayer Fire District, which serves 10,000 residents in a rural area north of Phoenix. “We were walking on egg shells over it.”

State public health officials, who license ambulances and in some cases dictate the medications they must carry, are loosening their rules to help emergency responders deal with the various shortages. Oregon health officials last week began allowing ambulances to carry expired drugs, and southern Nevada has extended the expiration dates for drugs in short supply. Arizona has stopped penalizing ambulance crews for running out of mandated medications.

Some agencies have reported keeping their drug kits fully stocked by substituting alternative medications, some of which have additional side effects or higher costs, or by diluting higher dosages to get the less-concentrated dose needed.

Several agencies reported using morphine in place of the painkiller fentanyl, even though adverse reactions are more common from morphine. Some said they’re diluting their stronger epinephrine doses.

Even those stopgap solutions carry risks, though, as fast-moving paramedics have extra steps and new dosage protocols to remember under pressure.

“It has such significant risk of patient harm or provider error that it’s worthy of immediate attention,” said Dia Gainor, director of the National Association of State EMS Officials.

The Food and Drug Administration recommends that expired drugs not be used, although the agency occasionally allows the use of specific batches if testing has shown they’re safe.

Manufacturing quality lapses, production shutdowns for contamination and other serious problems are behind many of the shortages, according to manufacturers and the FDA. Other reasons include increased demand for some drugs, companies ending production of some drugs with small profit margins, consolidation in the generic drug industry and limited supplies of some ingredients.

“The FDA is looking into solutions that would assist first responders and hospitals to use expired medications that they may have on hand during a shortage,” said Sarah Clark-Lynn, an FDA spokeswoman, “if there is data to support the medicine is safe and effective for patients,”

The EMS community is far from united on whether to use expired drugs. Emergency responders work under the license of a supervising physician, and some doctors are uncomfortable allowing the use of drugs after the effectiveness date expires. While Oregon’s Public Health Division has agreed not to fine ambulances for carrying outdated drugs, the state medical board that licenses doctors has been silent about whether that is an appropriate practice of medicine.

In the Las Vegas area, public health officials extended the expiration for drugs on the federal shortage list for up to a year. They’ve also approved alternative medications for some uses.

“It truly was an emergency stop-gap measure used to maintain the standard of care in the Clark County system,” Jennifer Sizemore, a spokeswoman for the Southern Nevada Health District, said in an email.

In Arizona, nine EMS agencies or the hospitals where they’re based have told the state they can’t get all the drugs they need to meet the state’s minimum supply that ambulances are required to carry. Before the state relaxed the rules last November, ambulances risked being taken out of service.

“The biggest shocker to us was, drugs that have been so common, so readily available forever, were suddenly just running out,” said Deputy Chief Steve Brown, who oversees EMS at the Salem Fire Department in Oregon’s capital city. “It just creates a lot of issues for us trying to figure out what a solution is.”

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Feds Pressure Depoe Bay Oregon Into Canceling Annual 4th Of July Fireworks So It Doesn’t Bother Birds

July 3, 2012

DEPOE BAY, OREGON – An Oregon town has reportedly canceled its annual fireworks show out of concern the Fourth of July pyrotechnics will scare sea birds roosting nearby.

Town officials in Depoe Bay have announced the cancellation of the annual pre-Independence Day fireworks show on July 3 following pressure from federal wildlife managers who said the noise disrupts sea birds in the area, the Oregonian reports.

The move has irked local business owners who count on the popular show to bring foot traffic.

“It’s a great loss to our community,” Peggy Leoni, co-owner of Trollers Lodge, a small motel in Depoe Bay, told the newspaper.

Rebecca Chuck, deputy project leader with the Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, said the move was necessary to protect species such as the Brandt’s cormorant that nest at Pirates Cove.

The cove is less than a mile south of Boiler Bay, where the fireworks show is held, and seabird colonies on the north coast face intensifying pressure from bald eagles and other predators. The event at Boiler Bay has been a tradition since 1993.

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Packs Of Savage Black Youths Attacking Individuals And Groups In Portland Oregon

June 16, 2012

PORTLAND, OREGON – Portland’s bureaus of Police and Parks will join forces this weekend to increase security in Laurelhurst Park after reports of two large-scale fights there Wednesday and Thursday nights.

According to those who reported the incidents to police, both assaults involved a large group of teenage boys who attacked either an individual or a small group.

Police say they learned of the first incident Wednesday evening when called to the Southeast Portland park about 10:36 p.m. to investigate a report of 150 drunken teens. When they arrived, they told the teens they found to leave. But they were then flagged down by a young woman who told them that a 14-year-old boy had been beaten up and was lying on a picnic table at the west end of the park.

Officers found the boy, who said he’d been with a friend when he was attacked by five to 10 other boys who seemed to be randomly attacking others, including at least one transient. The boy said the group also stole his cell phone, his iPod, his headphones and a hat.

No other victims came forward, however, and police didn’t find other victims. The boy was treated by firefighters and taken to an area hospital for further treatment of minor injuries.

The next night, police were called at 10:26 on a report of another fight, this one involving more than 20 young men. When they arrived, officers didn’t see a fight but found three adult men who said they had been attacked by 20 to 30 teenage boys.

The victims said they had been playing “soccer tennis” at the tennis courts in the southeast corner of the park when some of the teens began throwing bottles onto the court and calling out to them. They said the teens then began fighting with them. They suffered facial injuries but declined medical attention.

In an effort to stem the problem, police and parks workers plan to close the park at 10 p.m. Friday and through the weekend instead of the usual midnight closure. Also, officers will have extra patrols in the park and the surrounding area.

Sgt. Pete Simpson, a spokesman for the Portland Police Bureau, said the incidents do not appear to be gang-related and there is nothing so far indicating bias crimes. He also noted that the incidents took place in two different parts of the park.

“But two incidents warrant extra patrols and extra attention,” he said, which is why the park is being closed earlier than usual and the patrols added. “We just want to make sure this is not repeated.”

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Dumbass Oregon Tax Officals Paid $2.1 Million To Woman Who Claimed $3 Million Income On Phony Return – Return Examined By “Several” Employees Before They Released Millions Of Dollars

June 11, 2012

OREGON – A woman who was given a $2.1million tax refund after filing a false claim went on a massive spending spree until she was caught.

Krystle Marie Reyes was only caught after she reported the Visa card containing the seven figure sum had been lost.

By that time she had already spent more than $150,000, including buying a car and other household items.
Krystle Marie Reyes was booked into the Marion County Jail on charges of computer crime and aggravated theft

The 25-year-old from Salem, Oregon, had used Turbo Tax to file her income tax return for 2011.

She claimed earnings of $3million but used the tax calculator programme to claim a refund of $2.1million, Oregon Live reported.

Due to the size of the refund, her electronic claims was examined by several people within the Oregon Revenue Department.

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Incredibly, they approved the payout and Reyes was sent a visa card by the tax preparation computer programme containing a balance of $2.1million.

Prosecutors said she went on a spending spree and spent more than $150,000.

She later reported the card missing, prompting an investigation which uncovered the massive fraud which is believed to be the biggest in the history of the state of Oregon.

Reyes, according to an arrest affidavit, paid $2,000 in cash for a 1999 Dodge Caravan and used the card to buy $800 worth of tires and wheels.

She was also caught on CCTV cameras using the card at various outlets.

According to the probable cause statement, Reyes spent $13,000 in Marion County over two days in February, $26,000 in March and more than $35,000 in April.

The statement says the fraud was discovered May 7 by the issuer of the debit card after Reyes reported a ‘second card’ as lost or stolen.

Oregon Department of Justice agents arrested Reyes on Wednesday at a Northeast Salem address.

The apparent ease with which Reyes was allegedly able to defraud the state revenue department has stunned officials.

‘They’ve got some explaining to do to restore the confidence of Oregonians,’ Rep. Vicki Berger, R-Salem, who serves as co-chair of the House Revenue Committee told the OregonLive.com.

‘Is this is an anomaly? If so, let’s make sure it never happens again. Or do we have a systematic problem in the way the Department of Revenue treats this and other transactions?’
Shop ’til you’re stopped: Among the items Reyes bought was a 1999 Dodge Caravan, similar to the one shown above

The revenue department processes about $7billion in tax returns each year on computer systems designed in the 1980s.

In January, the state’s chief operating officer, Michael Jordan, pulled the plug on a $100million computer upgrade that the department said would pay for itself by finding tax cheats.

In 2010, the state reported $559 million in delinquent taxes, mostly from unpaid personal and corporate income taxes.

Revenue officials estimate that, in 2006, Oregon’s personal income tax compliance rate was 81.5 percent – far lower than other states – and translating to $1.2billion in unreported or uncollected taxes that year.

Reyes has been charged with aggravated theft and computer crime.

She was released from Marion County jail and is due in court on July 5th.

Appeared Here


Cops Becoming Robbers – Stealing Property From Innocent People Not Charged With A Crime

June 1, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC – Something is desperately wrong with our legal system when the government can take property from innocent people who have never been charged with a crime. It’s happening all over the country thanks to the surreal doctrine of civil forfeiture, through which courts hold inanimate objects guilty of crimes, instead of going after the actual owners who – as actual people – would be entitled to the presumption of innocence.

Dispensing with that vital presumption has proved to be highly profitable for law-enforcement agencies, which are allowed to keep some or all of the value of a seized asset. On Wednesday, Minnesota’s state auditor released a comprehensive report on $5 million worth of property grabbed in the state. A regular audit was put into place after a prior investigation revealed a police gang task force allowed seized cash and automobiles to go “missing.” Oregon’s Forfeiture Oversight Advisory Committee revealed on May 21 that cops had seized $1.8 million in cash and property last year.

After federal law was amended in 1984 to expand the use of asset seizure to combat the drug war, forfeiture cases have exploded. In 2008, the Justice Department’s Asset Forfeiture Fund had more than $1 billion in assets. Where state laws place a limit on the use of seized funds, federal law provides a work-around. Consequently, forfeiture funds now are a significant budgetary source for many agencies, increasing the incentive to seize property.

The system is ripe for abuse, as a recent comprehensive report by the Institute for Justice (IJ) details. In 27 states, the government only needs to make its case with a “preponderance of the evidence” standard, which is far below the “beyond a reasonable doubt” standard prosecutors must meet for a criminal conviction. Some states even use the lowest possible standard – “probable cause” – in seizure cases.

That stacks the deck heavily against the property owner. Even though state and federal laws offer an “innocent owner” defense, the owner bears the burden of establishing innocence – a complete reversal of the usual burden of proof. This has resulted in shocking abuses of power.

In Massachusetts, the feds and the local police are acting in concert to seize the motel owned by Russ Caswell because there might have been some drug-dealing in some of the rooms, even though the owners were unaware of it and are cooperating with the police. Perhaps the worst example comes from Wisconsin, where, as detailed by the Huffington Post’s Radley Balko, police seized the bail money of a mother who tried to get her son out of jail. The Brown County Sheriff’s Office did so by alleging the cash she had just withdrawn from ATMs smelled of drugs.

All of this happens because there is little oversight over the process. Civil forfeiture has long since lost its original link to the drug war and money laundering. At a minimum, the time has come to restore fairness by raising the standard of proof for a seizure. Better yet, the laws need to be re-written to entirely eliminate the profit motive from policing.

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Portland Oregon Police Officers Meet Skywest Plane Carrying 2 Children Who Wouldn’t Fasten Their Seatbelts

March 30, 2012

PORTLAND, OREGON — A Skywest crew radioed authorities Tuesday when two children refused to fasten their seat belts on a flight from Long Beach to Portland, Ore.

Officers with the Port of Portland Police Department were called to meet the Skywest-operated Alaska Airlines plane when it landed at Portland International Airport at 7:20 p.m., Alaska spokeswoman Marianne Lindsey told CBS2.

“During the flight, the children became disruptive and wouldn’t stay in their seats and wouldn’t fasten their seat belts, which is against federal regulations,” she said in a statement.

It was unknown if they were seated at the time of the landing.

“Following this, an Alaska Airlines supervisor meet with the family (of four), talked with them about the need to comply with Federal Air Regulations that the children must be in their seats and remain buckled when asked,” Lindsey added. “Our supervisor then personally escorted the family to the gate for their connecting flight Alaska Airlines Flight 2056 from Portland to Seattle which departed at 8:30 p.m.”

The family’s name has not been released.

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Obama Administration Awarded $5 Million To Oregon For Signing Up Residents For Food Stamps

September 30, 2011

n its quest to promote taxpayer-funded entitlement programs, the Obama Administration has actually rewarded one state with a $5 million bonus for its efficiency in adding food-stamp recipients to already bulging rolls.

It’s part of the administration’s campaign to eradicate “food insecure households” by improving access and increasing participation in the government’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Incidentally, the program was recently changed to SNAP to eliminate the stigma that comes with a name like food stamps. Just a few months ago the federal agency that administers the program, the U.S. WASHINGTON, DC – Department of Agriculture (USDA), launched a multi-million-dollar initiative to recruit more food-stamp participants even though the number of recipients has skyrocketed in the last few years.

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This week Oregon officials bragged that the USDA has given the state $5 million in “performance bonuses” for ensuring that people eligible for food benefits receive them and for its “swift processing of applications.” The money comes on the heels of a separate $1.5 million award from the feds for making “accurate payments of food stamp benefits to clients.” So welfare recipients are clients? .

It marks the fifth consecutive year that Oregon has been “recognized” by the federal government for “exceptional administration” of the entitlement program, according to the announcement posted on the state’s Department of Human Services web site. The state official who runs SNAP assures that her staff will “continue working very hard to exceed expectations” so that Oregonians can “put healthy foods on their table quickly.”

Could this be why the number of food-stamp beneficiaries in Oregon has increased dramatically in the last few years? Since 2008 the state has seen a 60% boost in the number of food-stamp recipients, which means that more than 780,000 people (one out of five Oregonians) get groceries compliments of Uncle Sam.

As if this weren’t bad enough, the feds are also giving the state a two-year grant to test an “innovative approach” to the food-stamp “client eligibility review process.” This will make it even easier for people to get food stamps because it grants state officials a waiver that allows them to grant the benefit without interviewing the candidate.

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Salem Oregon Officials Shut Down Dying Woman’s Yard Sale

August 17, 2011

SALEM, OREGON – A woman fighting a terminal form of bone cancer is trying to raise money to help pay bills with a few weekend garage sales, but the city of Salem says she’s breaking the law and is shutting her down.

Jan Cline had no idea, but the city of Salem has a clear law that states a person can only have three yard sales a year.

Cline has been selling her stuff in the backyard for a few weekends and said she thought she’d be fine by keeping the sale out of everyone’s way.

“It’s a struggle,” Cline says. “It’s a struggle for me because I’m very independent, used to taking care of myself.”

She’s run businesses and supported herself for years but this summer she was diagnosed with bone cancer.

“It’s a bone marrow cancer that eats through the bones and causes holes in the bones so that just by walking I can break a bone,” she says.

In one day she lost her independence, her ability to work and earn an income that could pay for all those medical bills.

So she decided to sell what she owned. The sale was bringing in several hundred dollars each weekend until one neighbor complained and she got a visit from the city.

“He said, ‘I’m sorry. Rules are rules.’”

Cline says she understands the city is trying to prevent nuisances in neighborhoods but she doesn’t think she’s causing any trouble.

“We make such an effort of making it back here (backyard) so that it’s not goobering up the neighborhood, so it’s not like a garage sale all laid out day after day after day,” she says.

Cline says she’s not looking for special treatment but maybe some understanding.

“I just hope that nobody else has to go through this kind of thing. I hope no one else has to give their lives away for nickels and dimes and then be told they can’t even do that. I hope nobody else has to do this ever.”

According to the Community Development Department, there is a reason for the law. In the past some people had set up what ended up being permanent flea-market-type sales on their property.

After hearing more about Cline’s situation, a supervisor said he is going to take another look to see if there’s anything she can do to operate within the law. But if she reopens now, it is a misdemeanor and about a $300 fine.

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Eugene Oregon Police Fell For Fake Anonymous 911 Call, Sent SWAT Team To Innocent Victim’s Home To Find Murder-Suicide Crime Scene

June 3, 2011

EUGENE, OREGON – Eugene police said they had no choice Monday night but to take seriously a 911 caller’s startling claim that he had just shot his father inside a River Road area apartment and was about to kill himself.

“It sounded like a critical call,” police spokeswoman Melinda McLaughlin said.

Fourteen police officers arrived at the Riviera Village complex on Corliss Lane in response to the 9:23 p.m. emergency call.

They left the scene after determining that the report suggesting a potential murder-suicide had occurred was bogus, McLaughlin said.

Investigators suspect the 911 caller obtained the name, address and telephone number of a man who lived at the apartment, then used that information to retaliate against the tenant after the pair squabbled while playing an online game on their Xbox video systems, McLaughlin said.

The apartment resident — a 26-year-old man who spoke with The Register-Guard on condition of anonymity — said he was targeted because he refused to give another player content that he had created for a game called FortressCraft.

“He tried to twist my arm over something relatively small in the game,” the Eugene man said.

For the past several years, cybercriminals have settled scores with foes by “swatting” — the name given to a telephone scheme that involves calling 911 to fake an emergency that could draw a police SWAT team response.

Swatters often manipulate computer and phone equipment to make it appear that a fake emergency call is coming from a victim’s home or business. That’s basically what led to Monday night’s police response to Riveria Village, McLaughlin said.

Police consider the 26-year-old apartment tenant a crime victim. But investigators don’t know if they will be able to track down the person who made the 911 call, McLaughlin said.

“We can’t tell where the call originated,” she said.

The victim said he thinks more than one person was involved in the hoax, and has begun his own investigation to identify the people responsible. He said he hopes to share what he learns with police.

He said he’s not sure how his personal information was compromised in the first place — but said the person with whom he had sparred while playing FortressCraft had informed him previously that his name and address could be found online.

“He brought it to my attention, like ‘I have this information on you, and you should protect it,’ ” the victim recalled.

The man said he was pleased with the way police handled the situation on Monday night. He said he and his girlfriend were detained and handcuffed while officers — with guns drawn — searched their residence to make sure that no crime had occurred there.

It may have been a more intense experience, had the victim not found out before police arrived that officers were headed to his home.

The victim said he learned from a friend who phoned him immediately after hearing someone make the 911 call while the friend shared a “vocal chat room” with the culprit.

McLaughlin confirmed that police received a call while officers were en route to Riveria Village asserting that the initial report was a hoax.

The victim said that while he has some computer expertise, Monday was the first time he had ever heard the term “swatter” to describe someone who calls 911 to falsely report an emergency at another person’s home.

“I am really good with computers, but I had no idea this could happen,” he said, adding that since Monday night, his e-mail and online video accounts appear to have been hacked.

“I really messed with the wrong guy,” he said.

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Portland Oregon Postman Who Took A Dump In Yard Keeps His Job, Gets A New Route

May 27, 2011

PORTLAND, OREGON – A mail carrier who was caught using a yard as his personal toilet will not be fired.

The incident happened last month at a home in southeast Portland and a neighbor, Don Derfler, captured the man in the act with his camera.

Derfler had been waiting for his babysitter when he saw his mailman acting odd at his neighbor’s house across the street. The postal worker then pulled down his pants and that’s when Derfler began snapping pictures.

“We trust people like the postal service and meter readers and people of that nature,” Derfler told us when we interviewed him in April. “To come on to our property and to defecate – it’s just wrong.”

The incident was an embarrassment to the post office and the worker was immediately placed on unpaid leave. Now, a decision has been made to keep the worker but he will be transferred to a different route.

A spokesperson said the administrative action was taken based on a postal service investigation but he did not elaborate. He also did not say which route the mail carrier has been assigned to cover.

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Woman Awarded $82,000 After Arrest For Trying To Read Portland Oregon Police Officer’s Name Tag, Asking For ID

April 16, 2011

PORTLAND, OREGON – A Portland jury has awarded a woman $82,000, after she was arrested when asking a police officer for a business card.

The woman, Shei’Meka Newmann, had sued the Portland police department, after she had watched the arrest of a man in 2009, questioned the arrest, asked an officer for a business card, and was arrested herself, The Oregonian reported.

“I think that police need to be reminded that it’s part of their job to de-escalate and defuse situations,” juror Chris Bolles told the paper after the trial Thursday. Jurors also said it would have taken just a few seconds for the officer to give Newmann his card.

Newmann had thought the arrest of the man, at a Portland light-rail station, was rough, and had sought the identities of the officers involved. But when she asked for a business card and tried to read an officer’s name on his uniform, she was arrested, the paper reported.

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Medford Oregon Police Officer Tyler Terrell Chase Arrested, Charged With Sexual Abuse Of A Minor

April 8, 2011

MEDFORD, OREGON – A Medford police officer has been arrested on a sexual abuse charge for reportedly engaging in a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old girl.

The case was investigated by the Central Point Police Department. The details were released Thursday.

Officer Tyler Terrell Chase, 23, was charged with third-degree sexual abuse and contributing to the sexual delinquency of a minor.

Both are misdemeanor charges.

Central Point police said the girl lives in Central Point.

“At the conclusion of our investigation, it is alleged that Tyler Chase had a sexual relationship with the 17-year-old female,” Central Point police Capt. Chuck Newell said in a news release.

Calls to Central Point police for comment were not immediately returned Thursday night.

A person commits third-degree sexual abuse when the victim does not consent to the sexual contact or the victim is incapable of consent because he or she is not 18 years old.

Chase was lodged in the Jackson County Jail Thursday on $8,000 bail.

He posted bail and was released.

According to the Medford Police Department’s weekly newsletter, Chase was hired by the department in 2009.

He previously served as a community service officer with the department and was assigned to North Medford High School as the school resource officer.

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US Postal Service Loses Package With 1800 Rolled Joints Inside

March 25, 2011

FLORIDA – Elvy Musikka, 71, of Eugene, Oregon, says the post office lost something that could cost her more than just a buzz. She could lose her eyesight.

Six metal tins packed with medical marijuana joints –1,800 in all — are in transit somewhere with her name on it. That’s enough for up to 10 potent smokes a day for six months.

It’s a prescription she receives twice a year to treat her glaucoma.

“I just don’t know what to do,” Musikka said.

Musikka says she’s one of four remaining patients getting pot for free as part of a federal government program called Compassionate Use Protocol, developed in the 1980s.

Her attorney says the cannabis is grown in a government lab at the University of Mississippi.

“It relaxes the eye so whatever excess fluid can get through, ” Mussika said.

She usually flies back to Miami, her former home, to pick up the pot from her eye specialist at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. But this time, the medicine was delayed, and she had to fly home without it.

Her attorney, Norman Kent of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, accepted the pot for her and shipped it as next-day delivery through the U.S. Postal Service on March 17.

It never arrived at Musikka’s Oregon home.

“I spent $120 for (shipping) three cartons, ” Kent said.

On Monday, Kent started calling the postal service.

He discovered he mislabeled the ZIP code. It was off by one digit and the shipment was sent to the post office in Santa Monica, California, about 850 miles away from Eugene, Oregon.

“I called consumer affairs’ lost and found, the complaint and tracking departments, and everyone says that they’re looking,” Kent said.
As each day goes by and it doesn’t show up, I just get more confused. It’s just very exasperating.
–Elvy Mussika, 71, medical marijuana user
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* Medical Marijuana

Now, more than a week after the packages were mailed, there has yet to be a whiff of the missing cartons.

“I find it fascinating that the post office can tell me because of their tracking that it was misrouted and can acknowledge that it went to the wrong place, but they can’t tell me what happened to it after that,” Kent told CNN. “It’s astounding.”

Kent said the contents are not marked on the outside of the cartons. Inside, he included letters explaining why the rolled joints are stacked within the shiny metal tins.

“As each day goes by and it doesn’t show up, I just get more confused. It’s just very exasperating,” Musikka said.

Musikka has her own website and sometimes lectures on the medical need for marijuana.

After spending hours on the phone with the postal service, Kent sent a letter to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Thursday asking for help.

In the letter, he wrote that he hopes “the DEA recognizes it is not in the public interest to have marijuana missing in the U.S. mails,” and adds the need to “make a record of this loss in order to procure a new prescription.”

Contacted by CNN, a U.S. Postal Service spokesman said the agency is looking for the lost shipment.

“She’s not asking for much,” Kent said. “Just her marijuana.”

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Taser Weapon Misuse By Portland Oregon Police Officers Costs Taxpayers $138,000 To Settle 2 Federal Civil Rights Lawsuits

February 28, 2011

PORTLAND, OREGON – As the Portland Police Bureau grapples with how to update its Taser policy, two federal lawsuits stemming from inappropriate Taser use suggest some city police aren’t familiar with the current restrictions on their use.

The city settled both lawsuits, paying a total of $138,073 to two men who were Tased by police after they had surrendered. In each incident, the men were on their knees with their hands locked behind, or on their heads when they were tased.

One man’s back was to the officer when he was shot with no warning, an arbitrator found based on witness statements, although the officer said she had shot him in the stomach.

Both men were charged with misdemeanors ranging from interfering with police to harassment. Separate juries cleared both of them and some charges were dismissed.

The officers violated bureau policy by using the Taser against people who were “passively resisting,” according to testimony from the criminal trials and civil depositions. But no discipline was issued.

Portland attorney Matthew McHenry represented both men in their lawsuits.

“These cases exemplify why law enforcement needs new and better training on Taser use,” McHenry said. “They both struck me as a case in which the Taser was used against people who were not a threat.”

Portland’s current policy — which allows police to use a Taser when someone physically resists or displays the intent to physically resist – is more permissive than other cities’ and model guidelines. The city auditor’s office has recommended a more restrictive policy.

A federal appeals court ruled in December that police can be held liable for using a stun gun against an unarmed person who poses no immediate threat. Deputy City Attorney Dave Woboril said that Portland’s current guidelines on Taser use are not precise enough and need to be improved to better guide officers.

In late January, the city paid $81,766to settle a federal civil rights suit filed by Hung Minh Tran, a commercial insurance broker, against Officer Jennifer Thompson.

The settlement came after a stinging rebuke from an arbitrator, who found that the officer’s sworn testimony conflicted with that of four witnesses and Tran.

reese.jpgThe OregonianChief Mike Reese
“Officer Thompson denies deploying her Taser against Tran while he was on his knees, facing away from her, but based upon the testimony of several witnesses, I find that she did,” arbitrator Alan Bonebrake wrote, adding she deployed probes into Tran’s back.

“This was unnecessary, unreasonable and an excessive use of force,” he wrote. Tran proved he was deprived of his civil rights from the use of the Taser, assault and Thompson’s negligence, the arbitrator found.

The encounter between Tran and Thompson happened Nov. 24, 2007 when the officer responded to the report of a woman assaulted at the Cheerful Tortoise bar, near Portland State University.

When Thompson arrived, the victim and her boyfriend were outside. As the officer was talking to them, Tran stepped out of the bar. The boyfriend accused some of Tran’s friends of being involved in the assault, and two began arguing.

Thompson ordered Tran back into the bar. Tran admitted that at first he refused in order to defend his friends, who the boyfriend claimed were involved. “He says it wasn’t me. It wasn’t my friends, then goes back in,” Tran’s attorney told jurors.

The officer testified that Tran pushed her and then went inside. She followed to arrest him. Thompson said Tran struggled and knocked her into a stack of chairs.

Tran testified that he didn’t know who was grabbing him from behind, and he struggled to get away. When he realized it was a police officer, he said he complied with Thompson’s requests and she dragged him back outside. He said the officer knocked him into the chairs.

Once outside, the officer’s account drastically differed from Tran and witnesses.

Tran said Thompson was giving him confusing commands, such as go against the wall, back up against the wall, and back away from the wall. He didn’t understand what she wanted so he did what he’s seen on TV: got down on his knees, with his hands locked behind his head, facing away from her, “so I’m not a threat.”

“I did not ever see a Taser. I was not warned about a Taser,” Tran testified. “All I remember is getting Tased in the back, and I didn’t know where that was coming from.”

At the trial, he showed photos of bruises to his back. Police didn’t take photos.

Thompson wrote in her report that once outside with Tran, she pulled her Taser. In her deposition, she said she probably did not warn Tran she was going to fire it, as policy requires. Her report said Tran had his hands up in the air, saying “OK, OK.”

“After the physical contact, twice pushing me, I decided to pull my Taser to get some compliance because he wasn’t complying with me physically. It wasn’t specifically at that second. It was everything to that point.”

Not until her cross-examination did Thompson say anything about drawing her Taser, reholstering it and accidentally firing probes into her holster when she reached to draw it out again. Thompson testified she probably didn’t put the safety on. She testified that Sgt. Cory Roberts told her to leave the accidental discharge out of her report since it wasn’t used against Tran then.

She said she then used the stun gun against Tran’s stomach and handcuffed him.

As a result of their encounter, Thompson never talked to a witness who saw the bar assault she was sent to investigate.

McHenry, who also represented Tran during his criminal trial, argued that Thompson lied on the stand. “She Tased him against her training, and she’s trying to cover for that,” he told a jury, who acquitted his client of disorderly conduct and interfering with an officer.

Woboril said police managers are aware of the settlement.

In her deposition, Thompson said she received a de-briefing from then–Central Precinct Sgt. Kyle Nice. (A police review board this month found he acted inappropriately for drawing his firearm during an off-duty road rage encounter.)

In a confidential memo Nice wrote to then-Precinct Cmdr. Mike Reese, he said the Tran case had caused Thompson anguish, she had reviewed it and would learn from it.

Woboril said he didn’t know if police internal affairs has reviewed the case. If not, the city’s “tort review group will certainly look at that result and see if the bureau needs to open one up.”

Last spring, the city paid out $56,306 to settle a federal suit brought by Christophe Clay, 24, against Officer John Hughes and Michelle Tafoya.

Also on Nov. 24, 2007 coincidentally, Clay had gone to the Game Crazy store in North Portland to buy an XBOX 360 controller. After an argument with a clerk, Clay asked the manager for the business’ corporate number. The business called police.

Officer Michelle Tafoya arrived and saw Clay walk out of the store. She immediately shouted commands and pointed her Taser at him. Officer John Hughes, who responded next, drew his Taser as well. Clay, both said, had his hands on his head.

Hughes testified that he told Clay to go to his knees and turn away from them. Clay got to his knees, kept his hands on his head and turned sideways to the police. “I said they can come and arrest me,” Clay said.

Because Clay would not put his face to the ground or turn fully away from police, Hughes fired his Taser at him twice. Police also threatened to Taser Clay’s friend who was videotaping them. Police said having a suspect lie face to the ground allows for a safer approach for officers.

At Clay’s criminal trial, Hughes acknowledged Clay was passively resisting, not moving toward him, not reaching for anything. When questioned by Clay’s criminal defense attorney Stephanie Engelsman, Hughes admitted he violated bureau policy.

“I don’t think there was any dispute dramatically as to what Clay was doing at the moment he was Tasered,” said deputy city attorney Scott Moede, who represented the officers in the civil suit.

Clay said he sued Tafoya because she started the encounter “yelling at me like a mad person,” without ever trying to talk, and Hughes for shooting him.

“I shouldn’t have to sue to look for justice,” Clay said.

The city settled these cases, and no discipline followed. The plaintiffs’ attorney isn’t surprised.

“That’s why we have to file these cases because that’s the only way there’s any type of satisfaction,” McHenry said.

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Portland Oregon Police Surround Gun Store After Pedestrian Reports Seeing A Gun

September 14, 2010

PORTLAND, OREGON – Police responded in force to reports of a man with a gun in Southeast Portland late Monday — only to find a confused customer and staff at a gun store.

A passerby outside the Gun Room Inc., 5537 S.E. Foster Rd., called 9-1-1 about 6 p.m. to report that a man standing outside was holding a gun and looked “nervous and sweaty,” said Sgt. Pete Simpson, a Portland Police Bureau spokesman.

Area residents reported seeing officers surround the shop and set up a perimeter with assault rifles drawn. But police quickly realized the “suspicious” man was there to sell a gun. They left without issuing any citations, Simpson said.

“The police response was appropriate,” Simpson said. “If you thought someone was robbing a gun shop, you’re going to show up with guns.”

A man who answered the phone at the Gun Room called the incident “just a case of mistaken identity,” but declined to comment further.

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Crazed Oregon Department Of Human Services And Lane County Circuit Court Judge Kip Leonard Keep Canadian Child In State Custody For 2 Years For No Reason

May 30, 2010

OREGON – Almost two years after a 12-year-old Calgary boy was whisked into foster care in the United States in a bizarre custody dispute, an Oregon court judge has decided he’s coming home.

Noah Kirkman will be back home in Canada in a few weeks, but there was no suggestion that anything was amiss that caused the youngster to be kept from his family for almost two years.

“Noah was happy,” said Tony Merchant, the Regina-based lawyer for the family of the boy, who will finish his school year in Oregon.

Mr. Merchant, who has been involved in the case for the last few months, said that something was truly “bizarre” in the handling of this case. But he didn’t blame the judge who led it.

“I don’t know how things went wrong before I was involved,” Mr. Merchant said. “I don’t think Judge Leonard is at fault.”

Noah also met with his grandparents Thursday night, looked at his Calgary home on Google Earth and is excited to be reunited with his parents and sister, Mr. Merchant said.

The court acknowledged that there are still transition issues, but Oregon officials have been told to work them out.

The boy, who had been caught in bureaucratic limbo since the summer of 2008, will be returning to his Canadian family in a few weeks, the judge ruled.

The legal nightmare began when Noah was vacationing with his stepfather in small-town Oregon, while his mother and younger sister remained at home in Canada.

The boy was riding his bike without a helmet when he was stopped by police, but had trouble answering questions. He has severe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but maintains an A average in school. Officials checked out his background and found an open social services file in Canada, which was the result of his special needs assistance, and that he was in the U.S. without his mother, his legal guardian and deemed her note permitting care by his stepfather wasn’t enough.

Noah was taken into custody to protect his welfare, although Oregon’s Department of Human Services won’t talk about the case citing privacy rules.

Noah’s mother, Lisa, and stepfather, John, who now resides with the family in Calgary and is the father of Noah’s sister Mia, (he and his wife for a time lived in different cities) have been fighting to be reunited with Noah ever since.

Last month, Oregon’s Lane County Circuit Court Judge Kip Leonard ruled that he might be open to sending the boy back to Canada when the school year ends, but there was no guarantee.

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Man Arrested By Washington County Oregon Deputies After Reporting Incident At McDonalds

May 27, 2009

HILLSBORO, OREGON – A man who called 911 to complain that McDonald’s left a juice box out of his drive-through order was arrested on Monday, Portland television station KPTV reported.

Raibin Osman appeared before a Washington County judge Tuesday on a charge of misusing emergency services. He said he called emergency dispatchers after the drive-through employee wouldn’t come back to the window to give him a juice box.

“We ordered some food and we went home and our order wasn’t in there,” Osman said in the 911 call. “And my little brother is crying for his orange juice.”

Osman’s father, Raof, said the emergency call was an innocent mistake and that it escalated when the McDonald’s employee laughed at the poor English of his son-in-law.

“We came back with our receipt and said, ‘Hey, can we have our order? We paid for it,'” Osman told the emergency dispatcher. “And she was like, ‘Oh, no, I can’t do anything about it.’ And she was laughing at my brother-in-law because he ordered the food and couldn’t speak English right.”

Meanwhile, the McDonald’s employee also called 911 after feeling threatened by the men.

“I showed them that everything was correct and they got mad and told me to give them more food,” the employee said in the 911 call. “And I told them, I can’t give any free food away.”

When deputies arrived, Raibin Osman admitted it was not an emergency call but said he didn’t know what number to use, according to the sheriff’s office.

“You need help from the police, you have to call the 911,” Osman’s father said. “I don’t have any other number.”

Deputies said Osman had been using a Blackberry and could have tracked down a non-emergency line using the phone, but Osman’s father said the officer simply should have provided his son with the non-emergency number.

Surprisingly, the incident hasn’t stopped the Osman family from eating at the restaurant. They said they’ve already returned since the arrest.

“The employee made the mistake, not McDonald’s,” Osman’s father said.

Osman posted bail and was released from the Washington County Jail on Tuesday night.

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Empty House Surrenders After Standoff With Police – Nutcase Former Veteran Clackamas County Oregon Deputy Sheriff Brandon Claggett Arrested For Kidnapping, Assault, And Menacing

April 21, 2009

OREGON CITY, OREGON – A former Clackamas County sheriff’s deputy was arrested late Monday night after an incident in Oregon City.

Officers were called to a home near the intersection of South Meyers and Deer Meadows roads at about 7:30 p.m. after a report of a domestic situation. A woman had run away from the home and called police from the nearby Haggen grocery store, according to authorities.

She told police that she had been injured and that the suspect, Brandon Claggett, was suicidal, authorities said.

A standoff ensued at the home, but police said they later reached Claggett on his cell phone and learned he was in Salem to pick up his children. Officers said they convinced Claggett to meet them at the Haggen’s grocery store, where he was arrested without incident.
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He has since been booked into the Clackamas County Jail on charges of assault, menacing and kidnapping.

Claggett, who was a 14-year deputy with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, resigned in October 2008 after being accused of inappropriately touching a 20-year-old woman who was participating in a ride-along with him. An internal investigation into the incident was suspended when Claggett resigned.

Police officers were awaiting a search warrant Tuesday morning before entering the Deer Meadows Road home. Claggett and the woman who called police are romantically involved in some way, according to officers.

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Empty House Surrenders After Standoff With Police – Nutcase Former Veteran Clackamas County Oregon Deputy Sheriff Brandon Claggett Arrested For Kidnapping, Assault, And Menacing

April 21, 2009

OREGON CITY, OREGON – A former Clackamas County sheriff’s deputy was arrested late Monday night after an incident in Oregon City.

Officers were called to a home near the intersection of South Meyers and Deer Meadows roads at about 7:30 p.m. after a report of a domestic situation. A woman had run away from the home and called police from the nearby Haggen grocery store, according to authorities.

She told police that she had been injured and that the suspect, Brandon Claggett, was suicidal, authorities said.

A standoff ensued at the home, but police said they later reached Claggett on his cell phone and learned he was in Salem to pick up his children. Officers said they convinced Claggett to meet them at the Haggen’s grocery store, where he was arrested without incident.
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He has since been booked into the Clackamas County Jail on charges of assault, menacing and kidnapping.

Claggett, who was a 14-year deputy with the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, resigned in October 2008 after being accused of inappropriately touching a 20-year-old woman who was participating in a ride-along with him. An internal investigation into the incident was suspended when Claggett resigned.

Police officers were awaiting a search warrant Tuesday morning before entering the Deer Meadows Road home. Claggett and the woman who called police are romantically involved in some way, according to officers.

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Portland Oregon Bomb Squad Closes Street, Pisses Away Tax Dollars Investigating Prosthetic Leg Near Washington County Jail

April 12, 2009

PORTLAND, OREGON – The Portland bomb squad was called to the Washington County jail this afternoon after a suspicious package was found near the entrance, authorities said.

The device, metal and cylindrical, was found in a bag, according to Sgt. Vance Stimler, a spokesman for the Washington County Sheriff’s Office.

Officials had closed down a section of Southwest Adams Street while the bomb squad worked only to discover that the object was a titanium prosthetic leg, Stimler said. He added with a laugh, “Crisis averted.”

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Man Pays $200 Multnomah County Oregon Traffic Ticket With Piss-Soaked Coins

March 27, 2009

PORTLAND, OREGON – A Washington man tried to pay a more than $200 traffic ticket by sending a plastic bag filled with coins and urine to a county billing office, deputies said.

“That’s something I can’t wrap my mind around,” said Sgt. Phil Anderchuk, of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. “The thought process of acting consciously — consummating the act of urinating in a box full of coins that someone is going to receive.”

The man didn’t break any postal laws by mailing the combination of urine and change to the Multnomah County court, reported television station KPTV in Portland. Postal officials said it is legal to mail urine or other bodily fluids as long as they are packaged properly in a way that doesn’t leak or smell. County employees said the package was wrapped tightly until it reached the courthouse mailroom and didn’t smell until it was opened.

Because of a policy of only accepting up to $20 in change, court workers returned his money — postage due.
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“It would be better if the gentlemen had done something that defused the situation and maybe mitigated it, rather than adding fuel to the fire,” said Jason Posner, who was visiting the courthouse Wednesday.

The county doesn’t intend to pursue the matter, as long as the man pays the $271 in charges that now include late fees.

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Man Pays $200 Multnomah County Oregon Traffic Ticket With Piss-Soaked Coins

March 27, 2009

PORTLAND, OREGON – A Washington man tried to pay a more than $200 traffic ticket by sending a plastic bag filled with coins and urine to a county billing office, deputies said.

“That’s something I can’t wrap my mind around,” said Sgt. Phil Anderchuk, of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. “The thought process of acting consciously — consummating the act of urinating in a box full of coins that someone is going to receive.”

The man didn’t break any postal laws by mailing the combination of urine and change to the Multnomah County court, reported television station KPTV in Portland. Postal officials said it is legal to mail urine or other bodily fluids as long as they are packaged properly in a way that doesn’t leak or smell. County employees said the package was wrapped tightly until it reached the courthouse mailroom and didn’t smell until it was opened.

Because of a policy of only accepting up to $20 in change, court workers returned his money — postage due.
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“It would be better if the gentlemen had done something that defused the situation and maybe mitigated it, rather than adding fuel to the fire,” said Jason Posner, who was visiting the courthouse Wednesday.

The county doesn’t intend to pursue the matter, as long as the man pays the $271 in charges that now include late fees.

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Oregon Officials Turn Off Water Heaters At Women’s Prison To Save Money

December 22, 2008

OREGON – Inmates at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility learned Saturday morning that they weren’t immune from the crummy weather.

The prison is one of 180 large NW Natural customers who were given a choice: shift to the back-up fuel systems or pay higher rates during the current cold spell.

The prison, some universities and big manufacturing firms among others have “interruptible service contracts,” said NW Natural spokesman Cory Beck. Those customers pay lower rates because they agree to shift to an alternate fuel sources or pay higher rates under certain conditions, such as long periods of cold weather, Beck said.

The company notified customers a few days ago that it was imposing the requirement. It will be in effect until at least Monday, Beck said.

Until then, almost 1,500 Coffee Creek inmates won’t get hot showers or more than one hot meal a day, said Department of Corrections spokeswoman Jennifer Black. The Wilsonville prison started using it’s propane-fueled back-up system Saturday morning.

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Oregon Officials Turn Off Water Heaters At Women’s Prison To Save Money

December 22, 2008

OREGON – Inmates at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility learned Saturday morning that they weren’t immune from the crummy weather.

The prison is one of 180 large NW Natural customers who were given a choice: shift to the back-up fuel systems or pay higher rates during the current cold spell.

The prison, some universities and big manufacturing firms among others have “interruptible service contracts,” said NW Natural spokesman Cory Beck. Those customers pay lower rates because they agree to shift to an alternate fuel sources or pay higher rates under certain conditions, such as long periods of cold weather, Beck said.

The company notified customers a few days ago that it was imposing the requirement. It will be in effect until at least Monday, Beck said.

Until then, almost 1,500 Coffee Creek inmates won’t get hot showers or more than one hot meal a day, said Department of Corrections spokeswoman Jennifer Black. The Wilsonville prison started using it’s propane-fueled back-up system Saturday morning.

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Dumbass: Oregon State Police Bomb Technician Bill Hakim And Woodburn Police Officer Capt. Tom Tennant Die After Bringing Bomb Into Bank

December 14, 2008

WOODBURN, OREGON – An Oregon State Police bomb technician became the second victim of a bomb in a Woodburn bank branch, State Police spokesman Lt. Gregg Hastings confirmed Saturday.

Two state troopers were killed when a bomb exploded inside West Coast Bank in Woodburn, Oregon.

Technician Bill Hakim, a senior trooper, and Woodburn Police Capt. Tom Tennant were killed in Friday evening’s blast, Hastings said. Both men were 51 years old.

Woodburn Police Chief Scott Russell, 46, was critically injured. A female bank employee also was injured. She was treated at a hospital and released, the State Police said in a written statement. Her name was not immediately available.

The FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are offering a $35,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone responsible.

The 5:24 p.m. explosion at West Coast Bank came after the nearby Wells Fargo Bank had received a threatening telephone call Friday morning from an unknown person, Oregon State Police said.

When authorities arrived at Wells Fargo Bank, they discovered a “suspicious object” that was later determined not to be dangerous.

Their investigation led to a suspicious device outside West Coast Bank, and all but two employees were evacuated from the bank, Hastings said. It was not immediately clear why those two employees were not evacuated.

The device was brought inside, and it exploded, Hastings said. He said it was not clear why it had been brought inside.

Bank President Bob Sznewajs said Friday that his employees told him authorities “scanned it outside, then brought it in.”

He said the two bank employees who had not been evacuated were in another part of the bank when the bomb went off. They received minor injuries. One may have been hit by flying debris, and another was “bothered by the sound,” Sznewajs said.

Hastings urged anyone with more information about the bomb to come forward.

“This individual or individuals took the life of two police officers and critically injured the chief of police and potentially could have killed one or both of the bank employees that were still inside,” Hastings said.

“That person is very dangerous, and that person needs to be found as soon as possible,” he said. “And if it takes a $35,000 reward, or if that reward even grows, to convince someone to come forward, to give us that information that’s going to break the case, then that’s money well spent.”

Sznewajs said there had been no previous incidents or threats at the bank.

“We would keep pretty close track on anything like that,” he said. “We haven’t had any.”

Woodburn Mayor Kathy Figley told reporters Saturday that the deaths of the two law enforcement officers and the wounding of the town’s police chief had left residents “shocked and saddened.”

Tennant was a 28-year veteran of the police department, and Russell has served as police chief since 1999, she said. Tennant’s wife is the town’s recorder, or clerk.

“We are talking about people who are our friends, our neighbors,” Figley said.

She said that as federal and state agencies investigate the blast other law enforcement agencies have stepped in to support the town and its police department.

“The safety of our community is paramount, and it is in good hands,” Figley said.
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The Wells branch and the West Coast branch are less than 150 feet apart.

Woodburn is in the Willamette Valley, about 30 miles south of Portland.

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Dumbass: Oregon State Police Bomb Technician Bill Hakim And Woodburn Police Officer Capt. Tom Tennant Die After Bringing Bomb Into Bank

December 14, 2008

WOODBURN, OREGON – An Oregon State Police bomb technician became the second victim of a bomb in a Woodburn bank branch, State Police spokesman Lt. Gregg Hastings confirmed Saturday.

Two state troopers were killed when a bomb exploded inside West Coast Bank in Woodburn, Oregon.

Technician Bill Hakim, a senior trooper, and Woodburn Police Capt. Tom Tennant were killed in Friday evening’s blast, Hastings said. Both men were 51 years old.

Woodburn Police Chief Scott Russell, 46, was critically injured. A female bank employee also was injured. She was treated at a hospital and released, the State Police said in a written statement. Her name was not immediately available.

The FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are offering a $35,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone responsible.

The 5:24 p.m. explosion at West Coast Bank came after the nearby Wells Fargo Bank had received a threatening telephone call Friday morning from an unknown person, Oregon State Police said.

When authorities arrived at Wells Fargo Bank, they discovered a “suspicious object” that was later determined not to be dangerous.

Their investigation led to a suspicious device outside West Coast Bank, and all but two employees were evacuated from the bank, Hastings said. It was not immediately clear why those two employees were not evacuated.

The device was brought inside, and it exploded, Hastings said. He said it was not clear why it had been brought inside.

Bank President Bob Sznewajs said Friday that his employees told him authorities “scanned it outside, then brought it in.”

He said the two bank employees who had not been evacuated were in another part of the bank when the bomb went off. They received minor injuries. One may have been hit by flying debris, and another was “bothered by the sound,” Sznewajs said.

Hastings urged anyone with more information about the bomb to come forward.

“This individual or individuals took the life of two police officers and critically injured the chief of police and potentially could have killed one or both of the bank employees that were still inside,” Hastings said.

“That person is very dangerous, and that person needs to be found as soon as possible,” he said. “And if it takes a $35,000 reward, or if that reward even grows, to convince someone to come forward, to give us that information that’s going to break the case, then that’s money well spent.”

Sznewajs said there had been no previous incidents or threats at the bank.

“We would keep pretty close track on anything like that,” he said. “We haven’t had any.”

Woodburn Mayor Kathy Figley told reporters Saturday that the deaths of the two law enforcement officers and the wounding of the town’s police chief had left residents “shocked and saddened.”

Tennant was a 28-year veteran of the police department, and Russell has served as police chief since 1999, she said. Tennant’s wife is the town’s recorder, or clerk.

“We are talking about people who are our friends, our neighbors,” Figley said.

She said that as federal and state agencies investigate the blast other law enforcement agencies have stepped in to support the town and its police department.

“The safety of our community is paramount, and it is in good hands,” Figley said.
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The Wells branch and the West Coast branch are less than 150 feet apart.

Woodburn is in the Willamette Valley, about 30 miles south of Portland.

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Woodburn Oregon Police Officer And Bomb Technician Botch Investigation Of Suspicious Object Outside Bank And Die. Police Chief Scott Russell Injured. Cops Wanted To Bring Bomb Into The Bank Branch Instead Of Leaving It Outside.

December 13, 2008

WOODBURN, OREGON – A bomb exploded inside a bank late Friday afternoon, killing a police officer who arrived to check on the suspicious object and a bomb technician.

A spokesman for the Oregon State Police, Lt. Gregg Hastings, said a Woodburn police officer died. He did not identify him.

He also said the blast seriously injured the Woodburn police chief.

The police chief, Scott Russell, was in surgery at a Portland hospital late Friday, said a hospital spokeswoman. Hastings said Russell was in stable condition.

Flying glass

Bank President and CEO Bob Sznewajs told The Associated Press that some bank employees might have been injured by flying glass but that none was seriously hurt.

Before the detonation, a Wells Fargo Bank branch nearby got a call that was “a potential bomb threat” but police searched and found nothing, Sznewajs told The AP.

He said his bank then got a call “from an unknown person saying that we should look for one as well. We called authorities, but they looked and found nothing.”

Sznewajs said one employee saw a device in the bushes near the bank and called the authorities. “We looked at it and evacuated the branch and sent people away,” he said.

Authorities decided to move the device inside the branch, apparently scanned it, and then it went off, he said.

Sznewajs said he did not know if the bomb went off on its own or as a result of the technicians’ investigation.

The
Marion County Sheriff’s Department said the device detonated at 5:24
p.m. The bank branch, which employs 3-5 people, normally closes at 6
p.m.

Sznewajs said he knew of no previous threats against the bank.

Late
Friday night, federal agents were talking with security people at the
bank about any information they may have, Sznewajs said.

Woodburn is an agricultural town south of Portland.

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Woodburn Oregon Police Officer And Bomb Technician Botch Investigation Of Suspicious Object Outside Bank And Die. Police Chief Scott Russell Injured. Cops Wanted To Bring Bomb Into The Bank Branch Instead Of Leaving It Outside.

December 13, 2008

WOODBURN, OREGON – A bomb exploded inside a bank late Friday afternoon, killing a police officer who arrived to check on the suspicious object and a bomb technician.

A spokesman for the Oregon State Police, Lt. Gregg Hastings, said a Woodburn police officer died. He did not identify him.

He also said the blast seriously injured the Woodburn police chief.

The police chief, Scott Russell, was in surgery at a Portland hospital late Friday, said a hospital spokeswoman. Hastings said Russell was in stable condition.

Flying glass

Bank President and CEO Bob Sznewajs told The Associated Press that some bank employees might have been injured by flying glass but that none was seriously hurt.

Before the detonation, a Wells Fargo Bank branch nearby got a call that was “a potential bomb threat” but police searched and found nothing, Sznewajs told The AP.

He said his bank then got a call “from an unknown person saying that we should look for one as well. We called authorities, but they looked and found nothing.”

Sznewajs said one employee saw a device in the bushes near the bank and called the authorities. “We looked at it and evacuated the branch and sent people away,” he said.

Authorities decided to move the device inside the branch, apparently scanned it, and then it went off, he said.

Sznewajs said he did not know if the bomb went off on its own or as a result of the technicians’ investigation.

The
Marion County Sheriff’s Department said the device detonated at 5:24
p.m. The bank branch, which employs 3-5 people, normally closes at 6
p.m.

Sznewajs said he knew of no previous threats against the bank.

Late
Friday night, federal agents were talking with security people at the
bank about any information they may have, Sznewajs said.

Woodburn is an agricultural town south of Portland.

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Porland Oregon Police Officer Chadd Stensgaard Caught Illegally Parked – Again

December 12, 2008

PORTLAND, OREGON – A Portland lawyer who successfully cited a police officer for parking his patrol car in a no-parking zone during lunch says the officer violated the rules again.

Attorney Eric Bryant says he spotted a patrol car parked in a “Government Vehicles Prohibited” zone alongside the downtown Justice Center last month and traced it to Officer Chadd Stensgaard, who was fined $35 last spring.

Bryant says he also gathered enough evidence at the scene to cite Multnomah County Sheriff’s Lt. David Rader for parking his vehicle in the same zone. Bryant has filed complaints against Stensgaard and Rader.

Sgt. Brian Schmautz of the Portland Police Bureau says a long-standing informal agreement police have with the city allows officers to park wherever needed while on duty. The agreement is expected to be put in writing.

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Porland Oregon Police Officer Chadd Stensgaard Caught Illegally Parked – Again

December 12, 2008

PORTLAND, OREGON – A Portland lawyer who successfully cited a police officer for parking his patrol car in a no-parking zone during lunch says the officer violated the rules again.

Attorney Eric Bryant says he spotted a patrol car parked in a “Government Vehicles Prohibited” zone alongside the downtown Justice Center last month and traced it to Officer Chadd Stensgaard, who was fined $35 last spring.

Bryant says he also gathered enough evidence at the scene to cite Multnomah County Sheriff’s Lt. David Rader for parking his vehicle in the same zone. Bryant has filed complaints against Stensgaard and Rader.

Sgt. Brian Schmautz of the Portland Police Bureau says a long-standing informal agreement police have with the city allows officers to park wherever needed while on duty. The agreement is expected to be put in writing.

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