Pack Of Savage Black Beasts Robs Dallas Texas Exxon Tiger Mart Store, Attacks Pedestrians, And Store Clerk

September 10, 2011

DALLAS, TEXAS – Another Flash Mob strikes now in Dallas Texas. A growing trend among criminal young people is spreading across the country. On August 26th, 2011, gangs of criminals, young people some as young as 11 years old are gathering to attack and beat innocent citizens at random at loot stores. We have posted videos of this riots from the east coast to the mid-west. This time it is in Dallas, Texas. A gang of young criminals attacked and beat other victims in the street before attacking the clerk at the Exxon Tiger Mart store in the video.

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Obama’s Justice Department Claims To Be Investigating Large Police Departments For Harassing Minorities, False Arrests, And Beatings

May 31, 2011

WASHINGTON, DC – In a marked shift from the Bush administration, President Obama’s Justice Department is aggressively investigating several big urban police departments for systematic civil rights abuses such as harassment of racial minorities, false arrests, and excessive use of force.

In interviews, activists and attorneys on the ground in several cities where the DOJ has dispatched civil rights investigators welcomed the shift. To progressives disappointed by Eric Holder’s Justice Department on key issues like the failure to investigate Bush-era torture and the prosecution of whistle-blowers, recent actions by the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division are a bright spot.

In just the past few months, the Civil Rights Division has announced “pattern and practice” investigations in Newark, New Jersey and Seattle. It’s also conducting a preliminary investigation of the Denver Police Department, and all this is on top of a high-profile push to reform the notorious New Orleans Police Department — as well as criminal prosecutions of several New Orleans officers.

The “pattern and practice” authority comes from a 1994 law passed by Congress after the brutal beating of Rodney King by white Los Angeles police officers, who allegedly yelled racial slurs as they hit him. The law allows the DOJ to sue police departments if there is a pattern of violations of citizens’ constitutional rights — things like an excessive use of force, discrimination, and illegal searches. Often, after an investigation, the police department in question will enter into a voluntary reform agreement with the DOJ to avoid a lawsuit and the imposition of reforms.

“Under the Bush administration, the Justice Department disappeared here in terms of federal civil rights enforcement. You could see the shift to counterterrorism at the ground level after Sept. 11,” says Mary Howell , a New Orleans civil rights attorney who has been working on police misconduct cases for more than three decades. “Now they’re back doing criminal prosecutions of police and the civil rights investigation, which is huge.”

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Lawrence Massachusetts Runs Out Of Money To Defend Its Police Department Full Of Bad Cops

February 21, 2011

LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS – Mayor William Lantigua says he will no longer pay legal bills for police officers being sued, including the bills for those officers involved in nine brutality cases pending in U.S. District Court.

The mayor says over the past three years, the city has spent $1.2 million to defend officers in civil cases. Instead, Lantigua says he will hold to the police unions’ contract, which says the city only has to pay the $5,000 retainer for a patrolman and $7,500 for a superior officer. Lantigua says officers have two options when they are being sued — to use one of the three city attorneys or have their unions pay for the defense.

“From Day One, this should never have been allowed. We cannot continue to do business as usual,” Lantigua said.

But Lantigua has hired his own outside counsel to defend the city against a complaint filed by the patrolmen’s union with the state’s Division of Labor Relations. The 10-count complaint alleges Lantigua’s decision to cut the legal payments is

“designed to punish the union and its members for exercising their collective bargaining rights.”

Patrolmen “are currently faced with the prospect of having to finance their own legal defense and personally satisfy any adverse judgments potentially rendered against them,” wrote Mark Esposito, the lawyer representing the patrolmen.

Resolution of the legal payment issue “is particularly time-sensitive, as it is essential that the officers’ rights are made clear so that they may determine how best to proceed regarding the defense of lawsuits pending against them in federal court,” Esposito said.

A “long-standing past practice” and a city ordinance “mandates that employees, including police officers, be indemnified against legal judgments pertaining to the performance of their duties to the maximum extent permitted by law,” he added.

According to Lantigua’s office, the city paid $471,374 to Dwyer and Duddy, the legal firm used by the patrolmen’s union, and $37,318, to McDonald & Associates, which represents the superior officer’s union, in the fiscal year that ended last June. In the previous year, the city paid Dwyer and Duddy $287,649 and McDonald and Associates $38,353.

Lantigua has hired Philip Boyle, an attorney from the private Boston firm Morgan, Brown & Joy, to fight the union’s complaint with the state. Last year, the city paid $53,186 to Morgan, Brown & Joy.

In many of the civil cases, the city, Police Department, police Chief John Romero and individual officers are named. The city recently settled one police brutality case, agreeing to pay $400,000 to the plaintiff, but admitted no wrongdoing.

Six civil trials involving police officers are scheduled to go forward in the next six months, including one brutality case, against officer Ivan Resto, which is supposed to start this week in federal court. These cases have the potential to result in expensive judgements or settlements that could ultimately be paid for by taxpayers.

City Councilor Daniel Rivera, chairman of the budget committee, said he was “inclined to support the administration on this, if it’s going to save the city money.” Rivera also said as the city struggled with budget cuts and layoffs last year, the police unions “made no concessions to help with the larger budgetary issue. And union leadership should know that.”

“There was an outrage over laying off police officers. Meanwhile, we are paying Cadillac prices for attorneys,” Rivera said.

Rivera acknowledged there are staffing issues in the city’s attorney’s office. A paralegal’s position was cut from the office and Richard D’Agostino, a full-time assistant city attorney, is on medical leave.

On Dec. 16, 2010, City Attorney Charles Boddy sent a certified letter to the patrolmen’s union law firm Dwyer and Duddy, stating “effective immediately the city of Lawrence was discontinuing use of the firm in the defense of Lawrence patrolmen against claims brought by third parties arising out of their employment.”

Payments to the firm have “clearly exceeded” contract obligations and “are an unwarranted burden on the municipal budget,” Boddy wrote.

Detective Alan Andrews, patrolmen’s union president, and Lt. Scott McNamara, who leads the superior officer’s union, were unavailable for comment for this story.

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Beatings And Paying Off Snitches With Drugs Is The Norm For Chicago Illinois Police Officers

January 27, 2009

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – As if Chicago police need another black eye.

This one could come from a punch extended halfway across the country, from a former Chicago cop who allegedly has been recorded on tape telling students at Colorado State University that beating suspects and paying off informants with drugs is just a way of life for police in “Chi-town.”

Dexter Yarbrough, a former Gresham District community policing officer, allegedly made the remarks to students in 2008 lectures taped by a graduate student, according to the campus student newspaper, The Rocky Mountain Collegian.

Yarbrough, who took a leave of absence from Chicago police in 2000 and officially resigned in 2005, is chief of the Colorado State University Police Department and associate vice president of the Department of Public Safety. He was placed on indefinite paid leave last month “pending the outcome of a personnel investigation,” according to a statement from the university.

The article in the school newspaper details numerous complaints from officers under Yarbrough’s command as well as the recordings made by the graduate student, a former county sheriff’s deputy who thought the chief’s comments were out of line.

Yarbrough allegedly told students that paying informants with drugs was acceptable, as long as the informants never revealed where they got the drugs, and that excessive and violent force against a suspect is a “reality of law enforcement.”

“If there’s a news conference going on, I can’t get in front of a crowd and say, ‘He got exactly what the [expletive] he deserved.’ You know the police should have beat him, you know. I used to beat [expletive] when I was in Chicago too. I can’t say that,” the article quotes a recording of Yarbrough as saying.

“I’d have to say, ‘Well, you know we’re going to have to look into this matter seriously . . . all of our officers, we like to think that they operate with the utmost integrity and ethics’ . . . All of that [expletive] sounds good. That [expletive] sounds real good, but in the back of my mind, damn. He got popped. If he would have done it the way we used to do it in Chi-town, man, none of this [expletive] would have happened.”

For the past year, Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis has tried to shake an image of abuse that has plagued the department. And in a statement Friday, Weis pointed to his creation of the Bureau of Professional Standards, which he said is improving officer training, supervision and leadership.

“Dexter Yarbrough is no longer a member of the Chicago Police Department,” the statement said. “Ensuring that the men and women of this department receive the very best training throughout their service career is a priority and we are proud of the hardworking men and women who comprise our ranks . . . Anecdotal stories expressed in a classroom setting are not indicative of the type of work that the majority of our men and women do.”

The university wouldn’t say why it’s investigating Yarbrough, and he couldn’t be reached for comment.

In a posting on the university’s Web site, Yarbrough described himself as a 15-year veteran officer who worked on “important and highly sensitive assignments.”

Chicago police say he was assigned to the Gresham District, most recently as a community policing officer who would have worked closely with residents and represented the department at local beat meetings.

Yarbrough was at some point up for a public safety job at the University of Chicago, the student article reports, but claims he was passed over. The university on Friday wouldn’t comment on whether he was an applicant for any job there.

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Beatings And Paying Off Snitches With Drugs Is The Norm For Chicago Illinois Police Officers

January 27, 2009

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – As if Chicago police need another black eye.

This one could come from a punch extended halfway across the country, from a former Chicago cop who allegedly has been recorded on tape telling students at Colorado State University that beating suspects and paying off informants with drugs is just a way of life for police in “Chi-town.”

Dexter Yarbrough, a former Gresham District community policing officer, allegedly made the remarks to students in 2008 lectures taped by a graduate student, according to the campus student newspaper, The Rocky Mountain Collegian.

Yarbrough, who took a leave of absence from Chicago police in 2000 and officially resigned in 2005, is chief of the Colorado State University Police Department and associate vice president of the Department of Public Safety. He was placed on indefinite paid leave last month “pending the outcome of a personnel investigation,” according to a statement from the university.

The article in the school newspaper details numerous complaints from officers under Yarbrough’s command as well as the recordings made by the graduate student, a former county sheriff’s deputy who thought the chief’s comments were out of line.

Yarbrough allegedly told students that paying informants with drugs was acceptable, as long as the informants never revealed where they got the drugs, and that excessive and violent force against a suspect is a “reality of law enforcement.”

“If there’s a news conference going on, I can’t get in front of a crowd and say, ‘He got exactly what the [expletive] he deserved.’ You know the police should have beat him, you know. I used to beat [expletive] when I was in Chicago too. I can’t say that,” the article quotes a recording of Yarbrough as saying.

“I’d have to say, ‘Well, you know we’re going to have to look into this matter seriously . . . all of our officers, we like to think that they operate with the utmost integrity and ethics’ . . . All of that [expletive] sounds good. That [expletive] sounds real good, but in the back of my mind, damn. He got popped. If he would have done it the way we used to do it in Chi-town, man, none of this [expletive] would have happened.”

For the past year, Chicago Police Supt. Jody Weis has tried to shake an image of abuse that has plagued the department. And in a statement Friday, Weis pointed to his creation of the Bureau of Professional Standards, which he said is improving officer training, supervision and leadership.

“Dexter Yarbrough is no longer a member of the Chicago Police Department,” the statement said. “Ensuring that the men and women of this department receive the very best training throughout their service career is a priority and we are proud of the hardworking men and women who comprise our ranks . . . Anecdotal stories expressed in a classroom setting are not indicative of the type of work that the majority of our men and women do.”

The university wouldn’t say why it’s investigating Yarbrough, and he couldn’t be reached for comment.

In a posting on the university’s Web site, Yarbrough described himself as a 15-year veteran officer who worked on “important and highly sensitive assignments.”

Chicago police say he was assigned to the Gresham District, most recently as a community policing officer who would have worked closely with residents and represented the department at local beat meetings.

Yarbrough was at some point up for a public safety job at the University of Chicago, the student article reports, but claims he was passed over. The university on Friday wouldn’t comment on whether he was an applicant for any job there.

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Rikers Island New York Jail Corrections Officers Michael McKie, Khalid Nelson, And Denise AlbrightCharged In Sadistic Fight Club At Jail

January 24, 2009

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – Officers Michael McKie, Khalid Nelson and Denise Albright called their fight club “The Program,” and the teens they recruited as enforcers were “The Team,” officials said.

Team members were allowed to extort commissary money, clothing and phone privileges from other city jail inmates.

Those who didn’t cooperate were beaten – and McKie and Nelson set the time, place and punishment, prosecutors said.

“They didn’t turn a blind eye to violence. They authorized and directed it,” Assistant District Attorney James Goward said at the trio’s arraignment.

“They turned jail into what might be called almost a nightmare environment where inmates were subjected to beatings, where inmates were recruited to commit beatings.”

In one case, Nelson had one group of prisoners show another the right way to deliver a beating so the injuries wouldn’t be so noticeable, prosecutors said.

Bronx District Attorney Robert Johnson said the motive was laziness: “It made their job easier.”

The abuse at Rikers’ Robert N. Devoren Center came to light after the Oct. 18 death of inmate Christopher Robinson – who refused to take part in “The Program.”

A hotline tip led to a probe into “predatory behavior,” said Department of Investigation Commissioner Rose Gill Hearn said.

The officers aren’t accused of ordering Robinson’s beating. Instead, McKie and Nelson are charged with enterprise corruption. Albright, a lesser player, is charged with conspiracy and assault. All three pleaded not guilty in Bronx Supreme Court.

McKie and Albright’s lawyer, Joe Jackson, called the 58-count indictment a “web of lies” spun by criminals. McKie’s mother, Carolyn, said the charges were “nothing but wickedness and lies.” Nelson’s lawyer, Renee Hill, said he “vehemently denies these charges.”

McKie and Nelson were held in lieu of $200,000 bail, while the judge set Albright’s bail at $50,000 – which the correction officers union said was “appalling.” All three officers were being held in the Westchester County Jail.

A dozen inmates also were charged, including three accused of manslaughter in Robinson’s death: Anquant Bryant, 18, of the Bronx; Joseph Hutchinson, 18, of Manhattan, and Shaddon Beswick, 18, of the Bronx.

Correction Commissioner Martin Horn said the allegations “broke my heart.”

“If the behavior alleged today is proven, these officers have stained … the good name of the 9,000-plus men and women who work in our jails every day,” Horn said.

Horn said the suspects weren’t caught sooner because they went to great lengths to conceal “The Program,” including lying in reports and signals to alert one another and inmates to supervisors.

Officials said there was no link between McKie and Lloyd Nicholson, a correction officer arrested in February for a similar scheme, also dubbed “The Program.”

Outside court, Robinson’s mother, Charnel, cried as she applauded the arrests.

“I feel like I’m one step closer to getting justice today,” she said, flanked by her lawyer, Sanford Rubenstein, who has sued the city.

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Rikers Island New York Jail Corrections Officers Michael McKie, Khalid Nelson, And Denise AlbrightCharged In Sadistic Fight Club At Jail

January 24, 2009

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – Officers Michael McKie, Khalid Nelson and Denise Albright called their fight club “The Program,” and the teens they recruited as enforcers were “The Team,” officials said.

Team members were allowed to extort commissary money, clothing and phone privileges from other city jail inmates.

Those who didn’t cooperate were beaten – and McKie and Nelson set the time, place and punishment, prosecutors said.

“They didn’t turn a blind eye to violence. They authorized and directed it,” Assistant District Attorney James Goward said at the trio’s arraignment.

“They turned jail into what might be called almost a nightmare environment where inmates were subjected to beatings, where inmates were recruited to commit beatings.”

In one case, Nelson had one group of prisoners show another the right way to deliver a beating so the injuries wouldn’t be so noticeable, prosecutors said.

Bronx District Attorney Robert Johnson said the motive was laziness: “It made their job easier.”

The abuse at Rikers’ Robert N. Devoren Center came to light after the Oct. 18 death of inmate Christopher Robinson – who refused to take part in “The Program.”

A hotline tip led to a probe into “predatory behavior,” said Department of Investigation Commissioner Rose Gill Hearn said.

The officers aren’t accused of ordering Robinson’s beating. Instead, McKie and Nelson are charged with enterprise corruption. Albright, a lesser player, is charged with conspiracy and assault. All three pleaded not guilty in Bronx Supreme Court.

McKie and Albright’s lawyer, Joe Jackson, called the 58-count indictment a “web of lies” spun by criminals. McKie’s mother, Carolyn, said the charges were “nothing but wickedness and lies.” Nelson’s lawyer, Renee Hill, said he “vehemently denies these charges.”

McKie and Nelson were held in lieu of $200,000 bail, while the judge set Albright’s bail at $50,000 – which the correction officers union said was “appalling.” All three officers were being held in the Westchester County Jail.

A dozen inmates also were charged, including three accused of manslaughter in Robinson’s death: Anquant Bryant, 18, of the Bronx; Joseph Hutchinson, 18, of Manhattan, and Shaddon Beswick, 18, of the Bronx.

Correction Commissioner Martin Horn said the allegations “broke my heart.”

“If the behavior alleged today is proven, these officers have stained … the good name of the 9,000-plus men and women who work in our jails every day,” Horn said.

Horn said the suspects weren’t caught sooner because they went to great lengths to conceal “The Program,” including lying in reports and signals to alert one another and inmates to supervisors.

Officials said there was no link between McKie and Lloyd Nicholson, a correction officer arrested in February for a similar scheme, also dubbed “The Program.”

Outside court, Robinson’s mother, Charnel, cried as she applauded the arrests.

“I feel like I’m one step closer to getting justice today,” she said, flanked by her lawyer, Sanford Rubenstein, who has sued the city.

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