4 Quebec Canada Police Officers With Suspected Connections To Organized Crime Arrested

June 17, 2012

QUEBEC, CANADA – Four Quebec police officers were arrested and released this week in connection with suspected ties to organized crime.

Two officers from the Montreal police force were arrested Thursday, one day after two Longueuil policemen were taken into custody.

Several reports Thursday said the officers were arrested and questioned in connection with an attack on a Montreal officer in Playa Del Carmen, Mexico two years ago.

Montreal police won’t comment on the arrests.

One officer was reportedly suspended without pay, and the other one will be reassigned to administrative duties, said CBC reporter Lauren McCallum.

The Longueuil officers were arrested on Wednesday, questioned and released.

Authorities “don’t know as of yet if there will be any criminal accusations,” said Longueuil police spokeswoman Nancy Colagiacomo.

The South Shore officers have been suspended with pay, pending the investigation.

They are both in the early 30s, and have between five and ten years’ experience on the force.

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Windsor Ontario Police Officer Det. David Van Buskirk Pleads Guilty After Brutally Beating Blind Doctor

April 29, 2012

WINDSOR, ONTARIO, CANADA – CBC News has obtained video that shows a Windsor, Ont., police officer beating a doctor who is legally blind.

Det. David Van Buskirk, who attacked Dr. Tyceer Abouhassan on April 22, 2010, pleaded guilty Thursday to assault causing bodily harm.

Video cameras at the Jackson Park Health Centre captured the beating, although much of the physical altercation is slightly out of frame. Afterwards, Van Buskirk wrote in his report that the doctor “”immediately reached out and grabbed my throat and pushed me backward.”

In pleading guilty, Van Buskirk admitted that Abouhassan “did not strike him at all.” He also confirmed that all of the doctor’s reaction “was in lawful resistance to being assaulted by the accused.”
David Van Buskirk has pleaded guilty to assault.David Van Buskirk has pleaded guilty to assault. (CBC News)

Julian Falconer, the lawyer representing Abouhassan, told CBC News that “in the face of denials by this officer and allegations that my client attacked, I think it’s essential that the public see this.”

Abouhassan, who is legally blind, suffered a broken nose, bruised ribs, a torn eyelid and detached retina in the beating.

Adding insult to injury, he was subsequently charged with assaulting a peace officer following the initial investigation by Windsor police, including Det.-Sgts. Paul Bridgeman and Patrick Keane.

Bridgeman watched the video between eight and 10 times before endorsing assault charges against Abouhassan, according to the office of the independent review director.

Both Bridgeman and Keane were charged with discreditable conduct for trying to prevent Abouhassan from filing criminal charges against Van Buskirk. Both were later exonerated.

Falconer said this case is the poster child for the failure of the police disciplinary hearings and a huge embarrassment for Windsor police.

“This was a vicious beating of an innocent doctor-turned-cover-up-turned-conspiracy, pure and simple. And our discipline apparatus couldn’t do a thing about it,” Falconer said.

Abouhassan has filed a lawsuit seeking more that $14 million in damages from the Windsor Police Department, seven of its officers and Smith, the former chief.

Van Buskirk is due to be sentenced on the assault charge Wednesday. Acting police chief Al Frederick has reserved comment until then.

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New York State Police Troopers Titus Taggart, Jeremy Smith, And Michael Petrits Suspended Amid Investigation Into Parties That Included Canadian Prostitutes

April 28, 2012

BUFFALO, NEW YORK – An internal investigation into alleged misconduct has led to the suspension of three State Troopers.

A State Police press release says Titus Taggart, 41, allegedly organized parties that may have involved the promotion of prostitution. The alleged incidents happened when Taggart was off duty. Taggart is assigned to Troop T in Buffalo, which patrols the Thruway.

A NYS Police spokesman in Albany confirms for 13WHAM News that Taggart’s father, Arthur, was a 34-year veteran of the State Police who retired in 1997 as a Colonel who served directly under two past superintendents.

Two troopers who are assigned to the Troop T Henrietta barracks have also been suspended without pay.

Jeremy Smith, 34, and Michael Petritz, 33, are accused of misconduct. A State Police press release says they were not involved in organizing the parties.

The suspensions are the result of an internal investigation and the NY State Police spokesman added that a parallel criminal investigation is also underway. He would not comment on the status of any other investigations by outside agencies. The spokesman was unaware how many Troopers could be caught up in the ongoing investigations.

Numerous media reports have cited sources that claim the women involved were brought into Western New York from Canada.

Criminal charges have not been filed.

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Study Flops As Scientists Can’t Find Males Who Haven’t Seen X-Rated Material

March 27, 2012

CANADA – Scientists studying the effects of pornography fell at the first hurdle – after failing to find a man who had not viewed X-rated material.

The researchers were comparing the views of men in their 20s who had never been exposed to pornography to regular users.

But Professor Simon Louis Lajeunesse, of Montreal University in Canada, said: ‘We started our research seeking men who had never consumed pornography. We couldn’t find any.’

Although hampered in its original aim, the study was then changed to examine the habits of men who regularly used porn.

It found single young men viewed such material on average for 40 minutes three times a week, compared with those in relationships, who watched it 1.7 times a week for 20 minutes.

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Canada Thought To Be Too Dangerous For Visit By Bush Era War Criminal Dick Cheney – Speaking Engagement Canceled

March 13, 2012

TORONTO, CANADA – Former U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney canceled a Canadian speaking appearance because of security concerns sparked by demonstrations during a visit he made to Vancouver last fall.

Cheney was scheduled to talk about his experiences in office and the current American political situation at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on April 24.

But Ryan Ruppert of Spectre Live Corp. said on Monday that Cheney and his daughter Elizabeth had begged off through their agent.

“After speaking with their security advisers, they changed their mind on coming to the event,” Ruppert said. He said they had “decided it was better for their personal safety they stay out of Canada.”

Last Sept. 26, Cheney was forced to stay holed up in the Vancouver Club for seven hours before it was deemed safe for him to leave. Demonstrators blocked the entrances and at one point scuffled with police.

Cheney critics accuse him of endorsing the use of water boarding and sleep deprivation against detainees while serving in former President George W. Bush’s administration.

Before the Vancouver event, Human Rights Watch urged the federal government to bring criminal charges against Cheney, accusing him of playing a role in the torture of detainees.

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Out Of Control US Homeland Security Agency Refuses To Allow Canadians With History Of “Mental Illness” To Vist – 9.6 Million Canadian Records Now Available To US Law Enforcement

September 10, 2011

WASHINGTON, DC – More than a dozen Canadians have told the Psychiatric Patient Advocate Office in Toronto within the past year that they were blocked from entering the United States after their records of mental illness were shared with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Lois Kamenitz, 65, of Toronto contacted the office last fall, after U.S. customs officials at Pearson International Airport prevented her from boarding a flight to Los Angeles on the basis of her suicide attempt four years earlier.

Kamenitz says she was stopped at customs after showing her passport and asked to go to a secondary screening. There, a Customs and Border Protection officer told Kamenitz that he had information that police had attended her home in 2006.

“I was really perturbed,” Kamenitz says. “I couldn’t figure out what he meant. And then it dawned on me that he was referring to the 911 call my partner made when I attempted suicide.”

Kamenitz says she asked the officer how he had obtained her medical records.
A document completed by a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officer says that at a secondary inspection at Pearson airport in Toronto, it was ascertained that Lois Kamenitz had ‘attempted suicide in 2006,’ and a medical clearance would be required for a further attempt to enter the United States.A document completed by a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officer says that at a secondary inspection at Pearson airport in Toronto, it was ascertained that Lois Kamenitz had ‘attempted suicide in 2006,’ and a medical clearance would be required for a further attempt to enter the United States. Sarah Bridge/CBC

“That was the only thing I could think of,” she says. “But he said, no, he didn’t have my medical records but he did have a contact note from the police that [they] had attended my home.”

Stanley Stylianos, program manager at the Psychiatric Patient Advocate Office, says his organization has heard more than a dozen stories similar to Kamenitz’s.

The office has also received phone calls from numerous Canadians who have not yet had encounters with U.S. customs officers, but are worried that their own mental health histories may cause security delays while travelling south of the border for business or family trips.
‘This is an issue’

“We get calls from people who have concerns about being stopped because they know this is an issue,” Stylianos says.
P.O.V.:

Have you faced mental health discrimination? Take our survey.

So far, the RCMP hasn’t provided the office with clear answers about how or why police records of non-violent mental health incidents are passed across the border.

Brad Benson from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security says medical records aren’t shared between countries. However, “if you have an arrest record, Canada would share that with us,” he says.

If a police encounter includes information about mental health, Benson says front-line officers can use it.

“Mental illness is actually under our law as a reason that you may not get admitted,” he says. “The issue is always going to be: could someone be a danger to someone [else]?”

According to diplomatic cables released earlier this year by WikiLeaks, any information entered into the national Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) database is accessible to American authorities.

Local police officers take notes whenever they apprehend an individual or respond to a 911 call, and some of this information is then entered into the CPIC database, says Stylianos. He says that occasionally this can include non-violent mental health incidents in which police are involved.

In Kamenitz’s case, this could explain how U.S. officials had a record of the police response to the 911 call her partner made in 2006, after Kamenitz took an overdose of pills.

RCMP Insp. Denis St. Pierre says information on CPIC not only contains a person’s criminal record, but also outstanding warrants, missing persons reports and information about stolen property, along with information regarding persons of interest in ongoing cases. It also can contain individuals’ history of mental illness, including suicide attempts.

The database contains anything that could alert authorities to a potential threat to public safety and security, and all CPIC information is available to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, St. Pierre says. There are a few exceptions, including information regarding young offenders, which is not available to American authorities.

“If a person is a danger to themselves and the police are dealing with that person in another jurisdiction … it’s valuable information, knowing that perhaps this person may harm themselves,” St. Pierre says.
9.6 million records

According to an RCMP website, the CPIC database stores 9.6 million records in its investigative databanks.

The RCMP and U.S. law enforcement agencies provide reciprocal direct access to each other’s criminal databases in order to stem the flow of narcotics and criminal dealings into North America, according to the WikiLeaks cable.

When asked about the sharing of police information for security purposes, Kamenitz says the government is “obviously not considering what the impact of that can be and how much that can alter a person’s life.”
Stanley Stylianos, program manager for the Psychiatric Patient Advocate Office, says Canadians should be outraged that people’s mental health information is shared across the border.Stanley Stylianos, program manager for the Psychiatric Patient Advocate Office, says Canadians should be outraged that people’s mental health information is shared across the border. Sarah Bridge/CBC

“Police may have attended my home,” says Kamenitz, “but it was not for a criminal matter; it was a medical emergency.”

Kamenitz notes that suicide isn’t a criminal offence in either country.

“It speaks to the myth we still hold,” Kamenitz says, “that people with a mental illness are violent criminals.”

At less than five feet tall, with a debilitating form of arthritis that makes it impossible for her to complete daily tasks like cooking and dressing without assistance, Kamenitz says she is hardly a threat to U.S. Homeland Security.
‘I am not a criminal’

“I’ve been battling not only anxiety and depression but also chronic pain since my teen years,” Kamenitz explains. “I am not a criminal.”

Kamenitz was eventually allowed to board a plane to Los Angeles, four days after missing her initial flight. But in order to do so, she had to submit her medical records to the U.S. and get clearance from a Homeland Security-approved doctor in Toronto, who charged her $250 for the service.

Benson says the response from the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officers in Kamenitz’s case was fairly typical. “Now that the note from her doctor is on her records,” he says, “I wouldn’t expect her to have any more problems.”

Included in the Homeland Security forms Kamenitz was required to fill out were questions about whether she had a history of substance abuse and whether she had diseases, such as AIDS or tuberculosis.

“These are private and personal medical records that I’m now handing over to a foreign government,” she says.

After years of private therapy and help from doctors at St. Michael’s Hospital and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Kamenitz says the border incident felt unjust.

“It was discrediting all the efforts that [I had] made to recover.”

Stylianos says Canadians should be outraged that people’s mental health information is shared across the border.

“It is an intensely private matter for many individuals,” he says.
‘You can’t control it’

Stylianos says his organization is lobbying for this information not to be included in the CPIC database or shared with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as part of a routine border screening process.

“Once that information gets into the American system, you can’t control it,” he says.

According to the same diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks, which included data from 2004 and 2005, Americans believed that despite the open database sharing, “Canada’s strict privacy laws” have limited the timely exchange of information between the two nations.

In the 10 years since the Sept. 11 attacks, the two countries have struggled to come to an agreement on how best to police the border.

The administrations of Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President Barack Obama are in talks over a perimeter security deal that would include further cross-border intelligence-sharing as part of a joint border security strategy.

In an Aug. 29 news conference in Toronto, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird told reporters that the privacy rights of Canadians remain top-of-mind during discussions about cross-border law enforcement programs.

“Our sovereignty cannot and will not be compromised,” he said.

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Regina Provincial Canada Judge Dennis Fenwick Sentences Man To Just 6 Years In Prison After Raping His Teen Daughter And Fathering Two Children With Her

May 4, 2011

REGINA, CANADA – In August 2004, a 12-year-old girl came into the Regina General Hospital in advanced labour, giving birth to a son the following day.

Hospital staff became suspicious both because of the girl’s young age and because she didn’t provide the name of the father.

Rumours began swirling that the father of the baby was also, in fact, the girl’s father, and so began a police investigation that resulted finally on Tuesday in a six-year sentence for the father on a charge of sexual assault.

The 45-year-old man -who can’t be named to prevent identifying the victim, who is his biological daughter -entered the guilty plea Tuesday at Regina Provincial Court in relation to assaults on the girl that eventually resulted in the birth of that child and a second just over a year later.

Judge Dennis Fenwick -referring to the offences as “reprehensible” -agreed to impose the sixyear term as jointly proposed by Crown and defence lawyers.

While the girl was reluctant to tell police the truth about what had happened, Crown prosecutor Chris White said she eventually admitted her father had given her alcohol and then had sex with her, resulting in the two pregnancies. The assaults occurred between Nov. 1, 2003, and Dec. 31, 2005, both within Regina and in other locations in the province.

White said the matter took such a long time to come to a conclusion because of lack of co-operation from the girl, her father and her father’s family -some of whom helped hide him from police for lengthy periods of time.

Police interviewed the girl again in October 2005, when she finally broke down and admitted the truth -that her father and she had sex and the pregnancy had resulted.

By that time, the girl was already pregnant again, with her second child by her father. At age 14, in December of 2005, she gave birth to a second son.

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Hamilton Canada Police Officer Arrested In Investigation That Yielded 57 Pounds Of Methamphetamine From 23 Homes And Businesses

April 16, 2011

HAMILTON, CANADA – A Hamilton police officer is among the 21 people arrested in what’s being described as the province’s largest-ever crystal meth bust.

Hamilton police put 26 kilograms of methamphetamine on display for the media at a Thursday morning news conference. They also seized steroids, cars, cash and other drugs.

The seizure was the result of raids at 23 homes and businesses by some 175 police officers in Hamilton, Niagara, Peel, Haldimand County and Sudbury. It came at the end of an 18-month investigation dubbed “Project Newton.”

The total value of the seizures — including $140,000 in cash — is estimated at $4 million. The 21 who were arrested face a total of 93 charges, including possession of the proceeds of crime, conspiracy to traffic anabolic steroids and trafficking cocaine and ketamine.

The investigation is ongoing and further charges are expected.

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Man Gets A Slap On The Wrist After Canadian Judge Shifts Blame To His Rape Victim

February 25, 2011

MANITOBA, CANADA – A Canadian judge whose controversial ruling and remarks in a sexual assault case sparked outrage is being investigated by the Canadian court system, a website statement said Friday.

Last week, Manitoba Justice Robert Dewar sentenced 40-year-old Kenneth Rhodes to a two year conditional sentence to be served at home for raping a 26-year-old woman.

That sentence, along with comments by Dewar which suggested that there was “sex in the air,” have led to several complaints from the victim and the public.

According to court records provided by CNN affiliate the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Rhodes met the victim and her friend at a bar before they drove out of town to a small lake on an isolated road in August 2006. The victim said Rhodes made several passes at her, and later that night, after she was intoxicated, he raped her.

“The victim was so afraid that she fled without pants through the woods,” prosecutor Sheila Seesahai told the court, adding that Rhodes took advantage of the much smaller victim.

Rhodes’ defense had a different story.

“It was a lapse of judgement on his part,” attorney Derek Coggan argued, according to court records.

The judge’s suggestion that the women’s choice of clothes and their behavior may have given the accused the wrong impression led many to believe he placed some of the blame for the attack on the victim.

Protesters upset with the judge’s ruling gathered outside the Law Courts in Winnipeg on Friday and shouted “no means no.”

Concerned about the dangerous precedent the ruling and remarks could set for future sexual assault cases, the protesters called for the judge to apologize to the victim and all Manitobans.

The court issued a statement on behalf of Dewar saying it was “inappropriate to comment further at this time” because the case could still be appealed.

The Canadian Judicial Council on Friday indicated its intent to review complaints against Dewar. A statement on the council’s website said the it “works to foster ongoing public confidence in the judiciary.”

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102,000 Bogus Edmonton Canada Police Speed Camera Tickets Worth $12.3 Million To Be Refunded To Scammed Motorists

January 26, 2011

EDMONTON, CANADA – Unable to verify the accuracy of certain speed camera readings, the government of Alberta, Canada announced Monday that it would issue full refunds to motorists. Doubt surrounds speeding citations issued from any of the forty-seven red light camera intersections in the city of Edmonton under a program known as “speed on green.” The refunds cover automated tickets mailed between November 2009 and January 14, 2011.

“This is the right action to take,” Minister of Justice and Attorney General Alison Redford said in a statement. “Our first concern is the fair administration of justice, and we cannot proceed with legal action when there is doubt about the accuracy of the city’s speed on green ticket technology.”

Edmonton Police Service officials have not disclosed the precise cause of inaccurate speed readings, but they admitted the automated ticketing machines generated at least twenty-six bogus readings. The problem was discovered when prosecutors examined a ticket claiming a vehicle was traveling at 143km/h (89 MPH) on Yellowhead Trail — along with every other vehicle on the road.

Although 141,729 tickets worth about $17 million were generated, only 102,700 worth $12.3 million have been paid. The profit is split between the city, the for-profit vendor, and the province which takes about 17 percent.

Despite the significant pricetag of paying back the fines, the Edmonton incident is far from the largest photo ticketing refund on record. In July 2003, a speed camera in Victoria, Australia accused motorist Vanessa Bridges’ 1975 Datsun 120Y of driving at 98 MPH, setting off a chain reaction of events that ultimately cost the state government A$26 million in refunds. Even after the thirty-year-old Datsun was tested and found to be capable of reaching speeds no greater than 73 MPH, police dug in their heels and insisted the photo enforcement system was accurate and that Bridges’ fine would stand. Intense publicity arising out of her case, however, forced an investigation into the cameras on the Western Ring Road. Independent testing showed faulty in-ground sensors and electromagnetic interference had been responsible for generating bogus speed readings. The government had no choice but to cancel 165,000 camera tickets.

Last year, police in Victoria, Australia admitted accuracy problems had surfaced again on the Hume Highway as the clocks used by average-speed cameras became unsynchronized. So far, officials have refused to provide refunds while a formal review is conducted. A report on the incident is expected within a week.

Alberta, Canada Cancels 141,729 Photo Tickets


Canadian Police Charge Homeowner Who Attacked Burglar With Hatchet – 5 Months After Incident

October 27, 2010

TABER, CANADA – A Taber farmer who smashed a suspected burglar in the face with a hatchet is facing assault charges.

On May 29, a couple arrived at their home northwest of Taber to discover an unfamiliar vehicle parked in the driveway. The 46-year-old homeowner parked behind the vehicle, trapping it, while he fetched a hatchet, RCMP said.

The man searched the house and found no one inside but soon encountered a man in his 20s trying to escape in the blocked car.

Police said the homeowner struck the man twice with the blunt end of a hatchet, smashing his teeth and face.

The injured suspect ran off but police tracked him down to his home.

Police arrested two other men on a road near the house. All three were charged with breaking and entering.

Now, five months later, police have charged the homeowner with assault with a weapon and assault causing bodily harm.

“Under the Criminal Code, people can use degrees of force when protecting property or a person, but there are limitations, especially if the courts determine it to be excessive force,” said Sgt. Patrick Webb.

Joseph Bradley Singleton, 46, is charged with assault with a weapon and assault causing bodily harm.

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Morinville Canada Prosecutor Karen Thorsrud Not Satisfied After Trial And Surveillance Video Clears Teacher Of Bogus Sex Abuse Charges

September 26, 2010

MORINVILLE, CANADA – A Morinville, Alta., teacher on trial for sexual assault has been found not guilty of all charges.

Michael Dubas, 55, faced two charges each of sexual assault, sexual interference and sexual exploitation involving two female students at G.H. Primeau School in the town about 30 kilometres northwest of Edmonton.

In delivering his decision in St. Albert provincial court Friday afternoon, Judge Brian Fraser said he believed Dubas when he denied touching the girls.

“In my opinion, Mr. Dubas, you have suffered a tremendous injustice,” the judge said.

The courtroom was filled with family members who wept and hugged Dubas afterward.

“I’m very, very, very happy to be clear of all these charges and just like to have my life back,” Dubas told reporters outside the courthouse.

He said he doesn’t know if he will return to teaching. Dubas was suspended from his teaching position at the middle school last year, pending the outcome of the court case.

“He’s gone through living hell. For a teacher, this is living hell to go through 11 months of this,” his lawyer, Brian Vail said. He called the video surveillance tape a “gift from God.”

Girls’ testimony not reliable, judge rules

The girls, who cannot be identified under a publication ban, alleged Dubas groped them in two separate incidents in February and October of 2009.

Fraser said the testimony of one of the girls was unreliable and pointed to a surveillance video showing the hallway at the time she said she was groped.

The video showed no evidence the attack occurred, the judge said.

The judge also found the actions of the other complainant did not fit with someone who had been molested. The girl told no one of the incident for a long time and made no attempt to avoid Dubas for the rest of that school year and the year after that.

Crown prosecutor Karen Thorsrud said she believed the girls were telling the truth.

“The judge made a finding that he disbelieved the complainants in this case but that is not evidence they were, in fact, lying,” she said. “And I can tell you that if I had thought they were lying, I would have never put them on the stand.”

The Crown has 30 days to determine whether they will appeal the judge’s decision, Thorsrud said.

During the trial, students who were witnesses for the defence testified they overheard the girls talking about a plan to lie about how Dubas touched them in order to get him fired.

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Peel Canada Regional Police Charge Man With Practicing Witchcraft

September 15, 2010

PEEL REGION, CANADA – Peel Regional Police have charged a Brampton man with fraud for pretending to practice witchcraft.

Investigators allege the suspect was taking money for witchcraft-related services at his home.

Police say the kinds of services the suspect offered are not being released due to the investigation.

It’s believed the services had been offered for well over a year, and police are asking for anyone with information to come forward.

Yogendra Pathak, 44, has been charged with fraud under $5,000 and pretending to practice witchcraft.

He is due in court Oct 7.

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Canadian RCMP Officer Chris Christinger Receives A Slap On The Wrist After Driving Drunk And Giving Alcohol To A Minor – After Posting Photos On Facebook

September 14, 2010

VANCOUVER, CANADA – Rookie RCMP Const. Chris Christinger has been docked 10 days’ pay after a day of partying at the Bella Coola Rodeo that included drinking before his shift, sneaking an 18-year-old girl into a beer garden and driving a police truck while under the influence of alcohol.

But Christinger’s biggest mistake may have been to take photos of his partying, some of which ended up on Facebook, where they were available for the general public, and his RCMP bosses, to see.

Christinger appeared before an RCMP disciplinary board earlier this year.

According to their decision, obtained by The Vancouver Sun, Christinger, an officer in Alexis Creek, was sent to Bella Coola to help police the community’s annual rodeo.

Christinger arrived in Bella Coola several hours before his 4:30 p.m. shift began.

So he went to the rodeo grounds, where he drank four bottles of Smirnoff Ice before heading back to his hotel, getting changed into his RCMP uniform and driving to the Bella Coola detachment.

Around 7 p.m., a senior officer, Cpl. Wallace, went to a roadblock where Christinger was stationed after receiving a complaint that Christinger had been seen drinking earlier in the day.

Christinger admitted to Wallace he had some drinks and gave a breath sample, which came back as 0.014, below the legal limit of 0.08.

Wallace told him to go home and not report for work until the next day. Christinger, however, wasn’t done partying.

Around 9 p.m., while still in uniform, he drove to the home of A.J., an 18-year-old he had met earlier in the day.

Christinger encouraged A.J. and her friends to jump on his police truck for photos, telling one, according to the decision, to “cover the licence plate so that they can’t trace it to me.”

In one of the photos, four women are shown holding beer, including one girl, identified as S.K., who was under 19.

Three of the photos taken by Christinger were later posted on Facebook where they were “publicly accessible.”

After partying at A.J.’s place for about an hour, Christinger returned to his hotel, changed out of his uniform and headed back to the rodeo with A.J.

There, the two went to the beer garden, where he “coached A.J. as to what to say to the security guards at the entrance.

“[He] also informed the security guards that he was a police officer and he would vouch for A.J. being of legal age.”

Once in the beer garden, Christinger met up again with A.J.’s friend, S.K., who he bought a drink for even though he “ought to have known [she] was a minor.”

The board hearing Christinger’s case, made up of three senior Mounties, found Christinger exhibited “disgraceful conduct.”

However, they noted he admitted his misconduct and was inexperienced, with only eight months on the job at the time of the incident.

RCMP spokeswoman Const. Annie Linteau noted that, under the RCMP Act, 10 days’ lost pay is the maximum financial penalty an officer can receive short of being fired.

“So, obviously the board took it quite seriously,” she said.

Christinger, who now works for the RCMP in Prince George, could not be reached for comment.

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Two Week Investigation And Late Night Raid By Canadian RCMP Agents Found Backyard Full Of Tomato Plants And Flowers

September 14, 2010

COURTENAY, CANADA — A Courtenay man is furious after police came to his house looking for marijuana, only to discover garden tomatoes and dahlias.

Speaking on condition of anonymity, the man said the incident has left him “sick to his stomach” and calling for more civilian oversight of the RCMP.

On Aug. 29 (Sunday) at about 10:30 p.m., the man was sleeping upstairs in his room. His wife, who was preparing to head to bed, saw several police cars pull up in front of the house.

He was presented with a search warrant for marijuana plants and told that he and his wife would be taken into custody to the police station.

He said he turned on the garden floodlight to allow the police officers more light for their search.

The police search had yielded only dahlias and garden tomatoes — plants that had mistakenly been identified by police as marijuana over a two-week investigation that included aerial surveillance of the couple’s back yard.

They hand delivered a letter outlining their concerns on Wednesday to the RCMP.

Last week, Inspector Tom Gray, the officer in charge of the Courtenay detachment, personally delivered a letter of apology to the couple.

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Longueuil Canada Police Ignore Call From Woman Who Accidentially Locked Her Infant In Hot Car – Was Told To Find A Cab

September 3, 2010

LONGUEUIL, CANADA – A suburban Montreal mother is furious after she says police refused to help unlock her baby from her car in a sweltering parking garage.

The woman said she accidentally locked her three-month-old daughter inside her car in Longueuil, south of Montreal.

She said she had just finished buckling her baby into the car seat and was about to get into the driver’s seat when the car doors locked automatically.

“I called 911 to say that I had a little girl who was 12 weeks old who was hungry and crying in the car,” the mother told all-news channel LCN.

The 911 operator told her that police would call back but that 30 minutes went by without any sign of help.

She finally received a phone call, telling her that police would not be coming and that she should find a taxi driver.

Not wanting to leave her distressed baby alone, she flagged down two passersby who found her a cabbie, who finally freed the exhausted child.

“It was 38 C with the humidex,” the woman told LCN. “It’s really unacceptable that the police didn’t even come for a baby who could have died.”

Longueuil police say they have opened an administrative investigation into the case.

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White Winnipeg Canada Judge Lori Douglas Wanted To Be A Slut And Gang-Banged By Black Men

September 1, 2010

WINNIPEG, CANADA – A prominent Winnipeg judge and her lawyer husband are at the centre of a lurid sex scandal, accused of harassing a black client to have sex with her.

“It made me sick to my stomach, like I’m living in a country with no integrity,” Alex Chapman said Tuesday.

Chapman says he was going through a messy divorce in April 2003 when his lawyer, Jack King, started pressuring him to have sex with his wife, Lori Douglas.

At the time, both King and Douglas were lawyers with Thompson, Dorfman, Sweatman. Today, Douglas is an associate chief judge in the family division of the Court of Queen’s Bench.

Chapman alleges King broached the subject over lunch, urging Chapman to visit a website called darkcavern.com, a website devoted to linking up white women with black men for sex.

“Over the next month, he tortured me to visit the website and have sex with his wife,” Chapman said.

Chapman said King took advantage of his weakened psychological state. At the time, he said he was having immigration troubles, was the victim of identity theft and had an ailing father in Trinidad.

“I was scared he would botch my case,” Chapman said. “I played along. I didn’t have money to pay another lawyer.”

An ad posted on darkcavern.com at the time and purported to have been written by King reads: “Make her a slut for total black domination, from public display to large group f—ed by gangs of young black men.”

The ad featured several nude pictures of Douglas.

King e-mailed him numerous nude pictures of Douglas, including domination poses and sex toys and oral sex acts, Chapman said.

Chapman said he met King and Douglas a number of times for lunch, during which King purposely left the two alone.

An e-mail dated May 27, 2003, purported to be written by King, reads: “Alex, I think she certainly likes you … What do you think of the pics?”

Chapman said he put King off until the conclusion of his divorce case, then hired a lawyer “to make him go away.”

Chapman was paid $25,000 and signed a confidentiality agreement which included a promise to destroy all correspondence and pictures he received from King.

But Chapman didn’t destroy the pictures and e-mails and in July filed a complaint with the Manitoba Law Society and Canadian Judicial Council.

“I was living in fear for seven years,” said Chapman, who continues to see a psychologist. “It’s important that this matter never happen to anyone else.

I want closure. This should never have happened.”

King is no longer with Thompson Dorfman Sweatman. The firm later sent a letter to Chapman, informing him it was now a limited liability partnership and not financially responsible for the misdeeds of its individual members.

Chapman said Douglas should step down from the bench.

“She should not be a judge,” he said. “She has no integrity at all. She was a partner in the law firm.”

Chapman said the couple treated him like a stereotype — good only for sex and sports.

“We don’t have brains to them,” he said.

Appeared Here


Kamloops Canada RCMP Officers And Others Watched Jail Cell HIV Infected Lesbian Sex On Security Cameras And Did Nothing – Country’s Federal Prisons Make Available Condoms And Lube To Inmates

August 29, 2010

KAMLOOPS, CANADA – The RCMP has launched a criminal investigation into the conduct of four officers and three civilians working at the force’s Kamloops, B.C., detachment who allegedly looked on as two female inmates — one of whom may be HIV-positive, according to media reports — engaged in sexual activity.

The women were placed in the same holding cell on Aug. 18, during which time they began a sexual encounter that lasted close to an hour, according to an inside source cited by Global News.

The source alleged that the officers and municipal staff on duty that day watched the encounter through cameras mounted inside the cell block for up to seven minutes without intervening.

The RCMP has confirmed that both criminal and internal code of conduct investigations have been launched into the “actions or inactions” of four RCMP members and three City of Kamloops staff.

Staff Sergeant Garry Kerr, acting officer in charge of the Kamloops Detachment, said in a release late on Friday that another criminal investigation is also underway that focuses on the actions of one of the female inmates in the cell. Police are required to investigate allegations involving people with HIV engaging in sexual activity with others without disclosing their condition.

“The only thing I can say right now is they’re all under Criminal Code investigation, obviously for criminal offences, and the RCMP members are also under investigation for what we refer to as code of conduct, which is like an internal system,” he said, noting that guards have an obligation to stop any sort of sexual activity among detainees.

“There are no guidelines just in effect to that, but if a guard sees that there is inappropriate behaviour going on, considering where they are, obviously they would be in obligation to do something,” Sgt. Kerr said.

Kamloops Mayor Peter Milobar has asked residents to remain patient while the investigations are ongoing, and is making assurances that the truth about what happened will eventually be made public. The city employees provide clerical support at the detachment, he said.

“We need to let the details get fully investigated and then steps will fall into place from there,” Mr. Milobar said.

While sexual contact between inmates in both provincial and federal detention centres is discouraged, it is not listed as a disciplinary offence in the federal Corrections and Conditional Release Act. Most federal institutions have house rules prohibiting sex between inmates, but many prison workers operate under a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, says Claudia Medina of the Prisoners’ HIV/AIDS Support Action Network.

“Using substances, needles and having sex, those things are still going to happen when prisoners are not being supervised,” said Ms. Medina, who visits federal prisons to educate inmates on safe-sex practices.

Recognizing that sexual activity will occur among inmates, in 2004 Correctional Services Canada implemented a policy making condoms, dental dams and lubricants easily available in every federal prison.

A CSC study released in March reported that 17% of male federal inmates and 31% of female inmates surveyed said they had engaged in either oral, vaginal or anal sex while in prison within the last six months. Almost all of them reported engaging in at least one instance of unprotected oral, vaginal or anal sex while in prison.

The same study found that the rate of HIV infection in federal prisons is 4.6%, about 15 times greater than that in the general population. In addition, the rate of infection of hepatitis C in federal prisons was found to be 31%, a rate 39 times greater than that in society as a whole.

Appeared Here


Vancouver Canada Police Officer “Apologized” After Attacking Disabled Woman – Caught On Video

July 24, 2010

VANCOUVER, CANADA – A Vancouver police officer has apologized after he was caught on video tape pushing a woman with multiple sclerosis down to the ground in the one of the country’s poorest neighbourhoods.

The 65-second video was uploaded to the web Thursday by the B.C. Civil Liberties Association.

It shows the 26-year-old disabled woman trying to weave her way through three male officers on a busy Downtown Eastside street last month.

One of the officers then appears to shove the woman to the ground, before walking away. The two other officers do not intervene.

“It’s not a particularly inspiring view of how policing should be done in the Downtown Eastside,” David Eby, executive director of the civil liberties group, said in an interview.

Eby said it’s hard to imagine the incident would have taken place in any other neighbourhood in the city.

“The pattern of use of force that we’re seeing tends to be focused in the 10 blocks of the Downtown Eastside,” he said.

The civil liberties association released a video earlier this month that raised questions about the arrest of a homeless Sudanese refugee within the Downtown Eastside. The force said the man tried to take an officer’s gun, but the association said he was only trying to push police away as they continuously kneed him.

The group filed a formal complaint in the case.

Eby said the group was then contacted by an advocate working with the woman last week and within days received the video, shot from a camera stationed at a nearby hotel. The incident occurred June 9.

Vancouver police held a press conference Thursday afternoon, a few hours after the video was made public.

Const. Jana McGuinness, the force’s spokeswoman, said the officer involved reported the incident to his supervisor the same day it occurred.

The department’s professional standards section then launched an investigation and notified the B.C. Office of the Police Complaints Commissioner.

McGuinness said the beat patrol officer, who’s been with the force since March 2009, apologized to the woman soon after.

“He did offer a genuine apology and he felt bad,” she said. “He regretted the incident and acknowledged the inaction after the incident when he did not offer her care.”

The officer is still on full duty pending the outcome of the internal investigation.

She said the video was obtained by an investigating officer within a couple of days of the incident but was not made public.

McGuinness said the force chose to comment once it was released by the civil liberties association because it will cause concern for many who view it.

“The VPD takes its responsibility for the safety of the residents of the Downtown Eastside very seriously,” she said. “If this incident has in any way caused the public to be concerned about our commitment to helping and serving the people of the Downtown Eastside, we are deeply sorry.”

Appeared Here


Three Police Officers In Toronto Canada Attack, Beat And Arrest Innocent Journalist Covering G20 Demonstration

June 29, 2010

TORONTO, CANADA – Freelance journalist Jesse Rosenfeld says police beat him Saturday night in Toronto as he covered a G20 demonstration.

A second journalist who witnessed the incident said it was “not a great night for democracy.”

Steve Paikin, host of TVO’s The Agenda public affairs show, was watching protesters on a downtown Toronto street, the Esplanade, on Saturday night.

In a message posted on Twitter, Paikin wrote that the demonstration was peaceful. “It was like an old sit-in. No one was aggressive, and yet riot squad officers moved in.”

Police told him to leave, and “as I was escorted away from the demonstration, I saw two officers hold a journalist.”

“The journalist identified himself as working for the Guardian,” Paikin tweeted. “He talked too much and pissed the police off. Two officers held him. A third punched him in the stomach. Totally unnecessary. The man collapsed. Then the third officer drove his elbow into the man’s back.”

The man was Rosenfeld, 26, is a freelancer from Toronto who is now based in the Middle East. He writes for Now Magazine, The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, The Montreal Mirror and This Magazine.

“An officer came up to me, looked at my ID, my alternative media centre press pass and said: ‘This isn’t a legitimate press pass. Put him under arrest!'” Rosenfeld said.

“At which point I was immediately jumped and beaten. The officer grabbed my arm, ripped it behind my back. I was punched in the stomach to make me go down to the ground. I was being hit in the ribs.

“All the time I was saying ‘I am not resisting arrest. I am a journalist. Why are you beating me?'”

According to Paikin, “this guy is about 5-foot-4, 140 pounds. I later spoke to his father and found out he’s only got one kidney, and he’s an asthmatic. Hard to see how he was a threat to anything.”

“Not a great night for democracy in our city, the way I saw it.”

Toronto police said Rosenfeld is welcome to file a complaint. He has hired a lawyer.

Rosenfeld was not the only person whose arrest perturbed Paikin.

On Sunday, he said he had heard from author and academic Valerie Zawilski. She had just been released from jail after being arrested for breaching peace during the Saturday night demonstration. “Gimme a break,” Paikin tweeted.

And Paikin monitored the arrest of the son of Kate Holloway. Holloway is a journalist, activist and was a Liberal party candidate in the 2007 Ontario election.

Her son Sam and Sam’s girlfriend were watching a demonstration Saturday night and were arrested.

They spent a night in jail and Sam’s parents had no idea where they were.

Appeared Here


Toronto Canada Police Raid Wrong Home, With Warrant They Couldn’t Produce, And Terrorize Innocent Family

June 27, 2010

TORONTO, CANADA – A Toronto veterinarian says police conducting a raid on anti-G20 protesters stormed into his home early Saturday, confronted him at gunpoint and handcuffed him — only to release him when they realized he had not been involved in any protest activity.

Dr. John Booth said the raid occurred at around 4 a.m. Saturday at his family’s apartment in a three-storey house at 143 Westminster Ave. near Roncesvalles Avenue.

Booth, 30, lives with his wife, Dr. Hannah Booth, 31, and his six-month-old son in the top two floors of the house.

“I thought it was a bad dream. Basically I woke up, and there were four police officers in my room,” Booth told CBC News.

“It was one of the very few nights I forgot to lock the front door and, lo and behold, they gained access and did not ring the doorbell, did not knock.

“One of them has his gun drawn and [it] is pointed at me, which is obviously an extremely unsettling way to wake up.”

Booth said police questioned him and he gave them his identification. They said they had warrants to search his home and arrest him.

Booth also said the officers informed him he was going to be charged with conspiracy to commit mischief and then handcuffed him.

Police never produced the warrants they spoke of, Booth said. They also spoke to Hannah Booth and woke up the couple’s baby in the nursery, he added.

Booth declined to give the name of his son, saying he didn’t want to get him involved.
Raid on downstairs apartment

Police had apprehended a number of anti-G20 protesters who were staying in another apartment on the ground floor of the house. Booth said he was taken to the lawn outside the home and made to wait there with several other handcuffed males.

While the officers waited for a police vehicle to take some of those on the lawn to a police station, Booth pleaded his case with the officers.

He said both he and his wife, who is also a veterinarian, were professionals who had no involvement with any criminal activity and that officers had no right to arrest him.

“That seemed to hit home. They conferred with their superior and then they took me back and said, ‘We apologize,'” Booth said.

Booth said he believed police were looking for someone named Peter.

The G20 Integrated Security Unit confirmed later it had conducted legal raids on two homes in Toronto and had arrested four people, one of whom was a 24-year-old named Peter Hopperton.

It could not confirm the addresses of the accused, nor the time of the raids.

Jillian Van Acker of the ISU, which includes members of the RCMP, Toronto police, Peel Regional Police and the Canadian Forces, said she had no information about the incident involving Booth.

“They shouldn’t have ever been in my house if they’d done their due diligence to actually figure out who was on site,” Booth said.

Booth said in email after the interview that the officers he dealt with were Toronto police, “as far as I could tell.”
‘Abuse of power’

Booth said he’s concerned about what he says was an overreach of police power in the lead-up to the G20 summit.

“I was listening to CBC Radio yesterday and they’re talking about …all the money going towards security [for the G20 summit] and the ultimate irony is that this is taxpayer dollars going to ‘keep us safe,’ and me the innocent bystander gets caught up in the middle of his over-policing and [this] abuse of power that occurred as a result.”

The Booths have filed a complaint with the Office of the Independent Police Review Director, a provincial police watchdog.

When asked if he and his wife will file a lawsuit, Booth said they aren’t interested in compensation.

“We would pursue that if it seems as though that’s the best means for accountability. Because that’s what we’re really after here — we just want them to ‘fess up’ and say, ‘Look, we screwed up royally and we’re sorry.'”

Booth works as a veterinarian at the Richview Animal Hospital in western Toronto. His wife, Hannah, is on maternity leave and recently took a position on the board of directors at the Toronto Humane Society.

Appeared Here


Windsor Ontario Canada Judge Falls For “Maple Syrup Urine” Defense, Sets Free Man Who Stalked 14 Year Old Girl

June 20, 2010

WINDSOR, ONTARIO, CANADA – A Windsor, Ont., man suffering from a rare metabolic disorder that causes brain damage was spared a jail sentence for stalking a 14-year-old girl.

Laith Sharma, 49, was charged with criminal harassment after he became infatuated with the girl he had never met.

The court heard he has developmental issues related to a genetic disorder called maple syrup urine disease. The condition, often diagnosed in infants with sweet-smelling urine, can lead to neurological damage and death if untreated.

Sharma was arrested last week after following the girl and writing her a letter professing his desire to marry her, the court heard.

Assistant Crown attorney Frank Schwalm pointed out Sharma was on probation from another criminal harassment charge when he became fixated on the 14-year-old girl in December.

Sharma was sentenced to 45 days of house arrest, to be served at his parents’ home.

Appeared Here


Crazed Oregon Department Of Human Services And Lane County Circuit Court Judge Kip Leonard Keep Canadian Child In State Custody For 2 Years For No Reason

May 30, 2010

OREGON – Almost two years after a 12-year-old Calgary boy was whisked into foster care in the United States in a bizarre custody dispute, an Oregon court judge has decided he’s coming home.

Noah Kirkman will be back home in Canada in a few weeks, but there was no suggestion that anything was amiss that caused the youngster to be kept from his family for almost two years.

“Noah was happy,” said Tony Merchant, the Regina-based lawyer for the family of the boy, who will finish his school year in Oregon.

Mr. Merchant, who has been involved in the case for the last few months, said that something was truly “bizarre” in the handling of this case. But he didn’t blame the judge who led it.

“I don’t know how things went wrong before I was involved,” Mr. Merchant said. “I don’t think Judge Leonard is at fault.”

Noah also met with his grandparents Thursday night, looked at his Calgary home on Google Earth and is excited to be reunited with his parents and sister, Mr. Merchant said.

The court acknowledged that there are still transition issues, but Oregon officials have been told to work them out.

The boy, who had been caught in bureaucratic limbo since the summer of 2008, will be returning to his Canadian family in a few weeks, the judge ruled.

The legal nightmare began when Noah was vacationing with his stepfather in small-town Oregon, while his mother and younger sister remained at home in Canada.

The boy was riding his bike without a helmet when he was stopped by police, but had trouble answering questions. He has severe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, but maintains an A average in school. Officials checked out his background and found an open social services file in Canada, which was the result of his special needs assistance, and that he was in the U.S. without his mother, his legal guardian and deemed her note permitting care by his stepfather wasn’t enough.

Noah was taken into custody to protect his welfare, although Oregon’s Department of Human Services won’t talk about the case citing privacy rules.

Noah’s mother, Lisa, and stepfather, John, who now resides with the family in Calgary and is the father of Noah’s sister Mia, (he and his wife for a time lived in different cities) have been fighting to be reunited with Noah ever since.

Last month, Oregon’s Lane County Circuit Court Judge Kip Leonard ruled that he might be open to sending the boy back to Canada when the school year ends, but there was no guarantee.

Appeared Here


Vancouver Canada Police, Having Solved All Other Problems, Now Targeting Bicyclists

May 30, 2009

VANCOUVER, CANADA – There is good news and bad news for Vancouver cyclists.

The bad news is that during June, Bike Month in the city, traffic cops will be ticketing cyclists who violate the rules of the road.

The good news is that they’ll mostly be handing out “information tickets” aimed at educating bikers.

The fake tickets list all the possible violations bikers can commit — and just how much they’d be on the hook for if they get caught when the police are more focussed on enforcement than education.

Cyclists can be dinged for $109 for riding without a bell, another $109 for not having a red reflector on the rear of the bike or a light on the front. Talking on a cellphone while wheeling down the road is also worth $109.

Forget doubling your kid on the back; that’s another $109. And no, you can’t grab on to the back of a car for a free tow. Nor can you stand up on your pedals to get up that hill — if you don’t have your butt in the seat, that’s another $109.

If you bump into a pedestrian and cycle away without turning over your particulars, that’s considered a hit-and-run — and it’s a criminal offence.

“A lot of cyclists, and usually it’s the casual cyclist, may not realize they are subject to specific requirements under the Motor Vehicles Act legislation,” said Lindsey Houghton of the Vancouver police department.

Houghton added, “By conducting this information campaign we want to educate cyclists rather than punish them. We want to see people on bikes obeying the rules of the road.”

Houghton said that 3,730 violation tickets at $29 a pop were issued to cyclists without helmets between Jan. 1, 2008, and May 1, 2008.

Arno Schortinghuis, president of the Vancouver Area Cycling Coalition, said many cyclists are infuriated by the campaign.

“It’s discriminatory. You would never see a police officer pulling over a car to hand out the rules of the road to a driver.”

Schortinghuis said he believes the campaign is misguided, and would prefer a campaign that addresses both drivers of vehicles and cyclists.

“Yes, cyclists are breaking the law if they don’t follow the rules of the road, but it’s not the cyclists that are going to kill or injure the driver of the car,” he said. “We want cyclists, drivers and pedestrians to be very well-educated and get where they are going as safely as possible.”

He said the money might have been better spent by policing bike routes for drivers who speed or cut around diverters meant to keep the routes car-free.

Schortinghuis complies with all VPD and city cycling bylaws, he said, including a few he considers ridiculous.

“The bell rule is totally absurd,” he said. “A bell is going to do nothing to alert a car that you’re coming. The biggest focus should be on changing behaviour of drivers.”

He said Vancouver could use improvements, such as vulnerable road user legislation, to protect cyclists, but “it’s probably safer than a lot of people think.”

He recommends bikers educate themselves through safety courses such as the one the cycling coalition offers called Streetwise.

Houghton said that during Bike Month while the information campaign is under way, real violation tickets will be issued “with a very high degree of discretion.”

While he agrees that drivers also need to be educated, he said the focus of the campaign is on cyclists. “If we save one life, it’s worth it.”

SOME CYCLING OFFENCES

Offence Ticket amount

Cycle without helmet: $29

Ride cycle on sidewalk: $109

Ride two abreast on roadway: $109

Ride while not astride seat: $109

Carry passengers on cycle: $109

Ride while attached to vehicle: $109

Ride without hands on handlebar: $109

Cycle without due care and attention: $109

Cycle without reasonable consideration: $109

Appeared Here


Nutcase Montreal Canada Police Assault, Arrest, And Jail Woman Who Wouldn’t Touch Dirty Handrail, Fine Her $420

May 18, 2009

MONTREAL — Anyone who has ridden an escalator and bothered to pay attention has seen – and likely ignored – little signs suggesting riders hold the grimy handrail.

In Montreal’s subway system, the friendly advice seems to have taken on the force of law, backed by a $100 fine.

Bela Kosoian, a 38-year-old mother of two, says when she didn’t hold the handrail Wednesday she was cuffed, dragged into a small holding cell and fined.

“It was horrible, disgusting behaviour [by police],” said Ms. Kosoian, a 38-year-old student of international law. “I did nothing wrong. They should go find the guys who stole my tires off the balcony.”

Ms. Kosoian, who studies at the Université du Québec à Montreal, was riding an escalator down to catch a 5:30 p.m. subway from the suburb of Laval to an evening class downtown when she started rifling through her backpack looking for a fare.

Ms. Kosoian, who grew up in Georgia when it was still part of the Soviet Union, says she didn’t catch the officer’s instruction to hold the rail when he first approached.

When he told her again to hang on, she says she replied, “I don’t have three hands.” Besides, she had been sick and feared catching a new bug.

That’s when the officer demanded identification so he could write her ticket, she said.

Ms. Kosoian started arguing. The officers handcuffed her and threw her into a small holding cell. The officers searched her bag and gave her a $100 ticket for failing to hold the banister and another $320 ticket for obstruction.

The handcuffs bruised Ms. Kosoian’s wrists and an officer’s boot scraped skin off the top of her foot.

She intends to fight the tickets.

Société de transport de Montréal regulations say “it is forbidden for all persons to disobey a directive or a pictogram posted by the Société.”

At the top of the escalator in the Montmorency station, a small sign indeed shows a stick man holding a railing with the words, “Hold the handrail.”

Montreal’s metro system is policed by transit inspectors and local police departments.

Isabelle Tremblay, a spokesperson for the STM, seemed relieved to establish late yesterday that Laval police stopped Ms. Kosoian.

“We were quite surprised to hear about this, we don’t give fines for such things,” Ms. Tremblay said.

Laval police were unable to provide an explanation yesterday.

As Ms. Kosoian noted, Montreal’s subway takes bicycles, strollers and babies but has few elevators, making banister-holding an unlikely juggling act for many.

Transit systems across Canada have struggled with innocent-sounding behaviour that can cause accidents.

A couple years ago, Toronto transit authorities removed signs urging escalator riders to stand on the right, walk on the left, because walking on escalators caused dozens of injuries. Walkers were not fined.

In the Vancouver region, officials will soon launch a campaign to discourage running, sliding down banisters and other risky behaviour.

“We do tend to tear our hair out sometimes at the ways people get hurt,” said Drew Snider, a spokesman for the regional transportation authority.

In Montreal, 16 students were injured in 2004 when an escalator suddenly stopped.

As for fears of catching another flu, a leading germ expert says you are more likely to fall down an escalator than catch illness from a handrail.

“No matter how dirty your hands become, all you have to do to avoid getting ill is wash your hands,” said Dr. Philip Tierno, the author of The Secret Life of Germs.

“Safety is first. If you break your head or break your neck, you don’t have to worry about washing your hands.”

Appeared Here


Nutcase Montreal Canada Police Assault, Arrest, And Jail Woman Who Wouldn’t Touch Dirty Handrail, Fine Her $420

May 18, 2009

MONTREAL — Anyone who has ridden an escalator and bothered to pay attention has seen – and likely ignored – little signs suggesting riders hold the grimy handrail.

In Montreal’s subway system, the friendly advice seems to have taken on the force of law, backed by a $100 fine.

Bela Kosoian, a 38-year-old mother of two, says when she didn’t hold the handrail Wednesday she was cuffed, dragged into a small holding cell and fined.

“It was horrible, disgusting behaviour [by police],” said Ms. Kosoian, a 38-year-old student of international law. “I did nothing wrong. They should go find the guys who stole my tires off the balcony.”

Ms. Kosoian, who studies at the Université du Québec à Montreal, was riding an escalator down to catch a 5:30 p.m. subway from the suburb of Laval to an evening class downtown when she started rifling through her backpack looking for a fare.

Ms. Kosoian, who grew up in Georgia when it was still part of the Soviet Union, says she didn’t catch the officer’s instruction to hold the rail when he first approached.

When he told her again to hang on, she says she replied, “I don’t have three hands.” Besides, she had been sick and feared catching a new bug.

That’s when the officer demanded identification so he could write her ticket, she said.

Ms. Kosoian started arguing. The officers handcuffed her and threw her into a small holding cell. The officers searched her bag and gave her a $100 ticket for failing to hold the banister and another $320 ticket for obstruction.

The handcuffs bruised Ms. Kosoian’s wrists and an officer’s boot scraped skin off the top of her foot.

She intends to fight the tickets.

Société de transport de Montréal regulations say “it is forbidden for all persons to disobey a directive or a pictogram posted by the Société.”

At the top of the escalator in the Montmorency station, a small sign indeed shows a stick man holding a railing with the words, “Hold the handrail.”

Montreal’s metro system is policed by transit inspectors and local police departments.

Isabelle Tremblay, a spokesperson for the STM, seemed relieved to establish late yesterday that Laval police stopped Ms. Kosoian.

“We were quite surprised to hear about this, we don’t give fines for such things,” Ms. Tremblay said.

Laval police were unable to provide an explanation yesterday.

As Ms. Kosoian noted, Montreal’s subway takes bicycles, strollers and babies but has few elevators, making banister-holding an unlikely juggling act for many.

Transit systems across Canada have struggled with innocent-sounding behaviour that can cause accidents.

A couple years ago, Toronto transit authorities removed signs urging escalator riders to stand on the right, walk on the left, because walking on escalators caused dozens of injuries. Walkers were not fined.

In the Vancouver region, officials will soon launch a campaign to discourage running, sliding down banisters and other risky behaviour.

“We do tend to tear our hair out sometimes at the ways people get hurt,” said Drew Snider, a spokesman for the regional transportation authority.

In Montreal, 16 students were injured in 2004 when an escalator suddenly stopped.

As for fears of catching another flu, a leading germ expert says you are more likely to fall down an escalator than catch illness from a handrail.

“No matter how dirty your hands become, all you have to do to avoid getting ill is wash your hands,” said Dr. Philip Tierno, the author of The Secret Life of Germs.

“Safety is first. If you break your head or break your neck, you don’t have to worry about washing your hands.”

Appeared Here


Dumbass Port Moody Canada Police Officer Crashes Into Innocent Motorist While Chasing Ferrari

April 26, 2009

PORT MOODY, CANADA – A Port Moody police cruiser crashed Wednesday afternoon after what witnesses described as a police chase with a Ferrari on the Barnet Highway, according to Vancouver’s News1130 radio.

The station, quoting Port Moody police, said an officer on duty saw a red Ferrari turn onto the highway and speed away quickly. Police said the car was weaving in and around other cars, although Constable Bill Kim woudn’t call it a chase.

Kim said the officer did try to catch up to the Ferrari, but couldn’t catch the car and lost control. “As the officer was attempting to close the distance, from my accounts, he might have hit a patch of road-gravel causing the vehicle to turn, lost control and swerved into a minivan with a single occupant.”

No one was injured in the crash. Police are still looking for the Ferrari and its driver.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Port Moody Canada Police Officer Crashes Into Innocent Motorist While Chasing Ferrari

April 25, 2009

PORT MOODY, CANADA – A Port Moody police cruiser crashed Wednesday afternoon after what witnesses described as a police chase with a Ferrari on the Barnet Highway, according to Vancouver’s News1130 radio.

The station, quoting Port Moody police, said an officer on duty saw a red Ferrari turn onto the highway and speed away quickly. Police said the car was weaving in and around other cars, although Constable Bill Kim woudn’t call it a chase.

Kim said the officer did try to catch up to the Ferrari, but couldn’t catch the car and lost control. “As the officer was attempting to close the distance, from my accounts, he might have hit a patch of road-gravel causing the vehicle to turn, lost control and swerved into a minivan with a single occupant.”

No one was injured in the crash. Police are still looking for the Ferrari and its driver.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Newfoundland Canada Police Officers Arrest Innocent Autistic Teen Because They Thought He Was Drunk

April 23, 2009

NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA – The chief of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary said Wednesday the force will apologize to an autistic teenager who was picked up and detained in a lockup because officers assumed he was drunk.

Dane Spurrell, 18, of Mount Pearl was stopped by an RNC patrol on Saturday night while he was walking along Topsail Road. Spurrell told CBC News on Tuesday the RNC assumed he was drunk because of his appearance and how he walks.

RNC Chief Joe Browne said Wednesday that while he does not yet have all the facts in the case, he will ensure that the force enhances its training so that it does not happen again.

Spurrell was held in custody overnight and released after his mother, Diane Spurrell, called to report that her son was missing. When informed that he was in the downtown lockup, she told the RNC that her son is autistic.

Browne said while such an incident has never happened before, he pointed out where he thought the confusion may have started.

“It’s not uncommon, actually, for people, depending on the level of autism, sometimes to be confused with somebody who may be under the influence of a substance, which appears to the case in this particular event. So we’ll be looking deeply into that,” Browne told CBC News in Labrador City.

“I’ll be talking to both the young man and the young man’s mother to ensure they understand our position and that we can apologize for the discomfort we’ve caused,” he said. “But other than that we have to look at ensuring there’s greater awareness around this so that these things don’t happen.”

Dane Spurrell said earlier this week that officers may also have thought he was intoxicated because he resisted his arrest. He maintained that he had done nothing wrong.

Jason Geary, who works with Newfoundland and Labrador’s Autism Society, said Spurrell’s arrest should never have happened.

“We were appalled, and the incident we feel was definitely preventable,” Geary said Wednesday.

“We definitely think that, going forward, we don’t have to have a repeat of this.”

Coincidentally, Geary said, the RNC had contacted him last week, before the arrest, to talk about a training program for its officers.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Newfoundland Canada Police Officers Arrest Innocent Autistic Teen Because They Thought He Was Drunk

April 22, 2009

NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA – The chief of the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary said Wednesday the force will apologize to an autistic teenager who was picked up and detained in a lockup because officers assumed he was drunk.

Dane Spurrell, 18, of Mount Pearl was stopped by an RNC patrol on Saturday night while he was walking along Topsail Road. Spurrell told CBC News on Tuesday the RNC assumed he was drunk because of his appearance and how he walks.

RNC Chief Joe Browne said Wednesday that while he does not yet have all the facts in the case, he will ensure that the force enhances its training so that it does not happen again.

Spurrell was held in custody overnight and released after his mother, Diane Spurrell, called to report that her son was missing. When informed that he was in the downtown lockup, she told the RNC that her son is autistic.

Browne said while such an incident has never happened before, he pointed out where he thought the confusion may have started.

“It’s not uncommon, actually, for people, depending on the level of autism, sometimes to be confused with somebody who may be under the influence of a substance, which appears to the case in this particular event. So we’ll be looking deeply into that,” Browne told CBC News in Labrador City.

“I’ll be talking to both the young man and the young man’s mother to ensure they understand our position and that we can apologize for the discomfort we’ve caused,” he said. “But other than that we have to look at ensuring there’s greater awareness around this so that these things don’t happen.”

Dane Spurrell said earlier this week that officers may also have thought he was intoxicated because he resisted his arrest. He maintained that he had done nothing wrong.

Jason Geary, who works with Newfoundland and Labrador’s Autism Society, said Spurrell’s arrest should never have happened.

“We were appalled, and the incident we feel was definitely preventable,” Geary said Wednesday.

“We definitely think that, going forward, we don’t have to have a repeat of this.”

Coincidentally, Geary said, the RNC had contacted him last week, before the arrest, to talk about a training program for its officers.

Appeared Here


Edmonton Canada Authorities Launch $1 Million Program To Check Dog Poop DNA

April 1, 2009

EDMONTON, CANADA – DNA testing will be the latest tool in the city’s arsenal to nab deadbeats who don’t pick-up their doggie’s doo, the Sun has learned.

Bylaw officials will begin using a new $1-million DNA analyzer to track down pet owners who fail to scoop their dog’s poop.

Owners will be required to provide a sample of their furry friend’s stool when applying for an annual licence this year to create a doggie doo-doo DNA database, which will be used to match feces left in parks and playgrounds back to individual dogs.

Bins will be set up at parks around the city where people can put scat they find left behind by thoughtless owners.

Simply toss the sample into a plastic bag, mark the date and time and place it in a bin, then city officials will collect and test them once a week.

Fines will be sent to offending owners by mail, with a first offence costing $500.

It’s hoped the $1-million cost of the machine will be paid off in less than a year.

If the dog program is successful, the city will look at expanding it to cats.

Veterinarian Dr. Hans Schulz, an expert in animal genetics, predicted the program will result in a “significant” drop in the amount of abandoned poop in the city.

“It’s a very simple process that has been used for many years in forensic criminology and it’s very similar to a fingerprint databank,” he said.

“I’d say it’s bang-on accurate.

“In a laboratory, you use computers, and the computers generate a DNA chart, which very clearly shows which dog left the poop on the pavement.”

But another genetics expert, Dr. Jack Russell, questioned how successful the program will be.

“Quite frankly, this whole scheme stinks to high heaven,” he said.

“The DNA-to-fecal matter ratio can be off the charts depending on what the animal is fed.

“The wrong dog could easily be collared by a science still in its infancy.”

After years of cleaning up behind his dog Snoopy while out on walks, David Stockdale said he’s glad the city is taking steps to punish those who don’t.

“It’s a great idea because who hasn’t stepped in some doggie doo-doo and dragged it into the house and the car and spent the whole afternoon cleaning it all up,” he said. “It’s not pleasant.”

Appeared Here


Edmonton Canada Authorities Launch $1 Million Program To Check Dog Poop DNA

April 1, 2009

EDMONTON, CANADA – DNA testing will be the latest tool in the city’s arsenal to nab deadbeats who don’t pick-up their doggie’s doo, the Sun has learned.

Bylaw officials will begin using a new $1-million DNA analyzer to track down pet owners who fail to scoop their dog’s poop.

Owners will be required to provide a sample of their furry friend’s stool when applying for an annual licence this year to create a doggie doo-doo DNA database, which will be used to match feces left in parks and playgrounds back to individual dogs.

Bins will be set up at parks around the city where people can put scat they find left behind by thoughtless owners.

Simply toss the sample into a plastic bag, mark the date and time and place it in a bin, then city officials will collect and test them once a week.

Fines will be sent to offending owners by mail, with a first offence costing $500.

It’s hoped the $1-million cost of the machine will be paid off in less than a year.

If the dog program is successful, the city will look at expanding it to cats.

Veterinarian Dr. Hans Schulz, an expert in animal genetics, predicted the program will result in a “significant” drop in the amount of abandoned poop in the city.

“It’s a very simple process that has been used for many years in forensic criminology and it’s very similar to a fingerprint databank,” he said.

“I’d say it’s bang-on accurate.

“In a laboratory, you use computers, and the computers generate a DNA chart, which very clearly shows which dog left the poop on the pavement.”

But another genetics expert, Dr. Jack Russell, questioned how successful the program will be.

“Quite frankly, this whole scheme stinks to high heaven,” he said.

“The DNA-to-fecal matter ratio can be off the charts depending on what the animal is fed.

“The wrong dog could easily be collared by a science still in its infancy.”

After years of cleaning up behind his dog Snoopy while out on walks, David Stockdale said he’s glad the city is taking steps to punish those who don’t.

“It’s a great idea because who hasn’t stepped in some doggie doo-doo and dragged it into the house and the car and spent the whole afternoon cleaning it all up,” he said. “It’s not pleasant.”

Appeared Here


North Vancouver Canada Police Officer Darren Baker Receives A Slap On The Wrist For Drunk Driving

February 27, 2009

NORTH VANCOUVER, CANADA – A North Vancouver police officer has been punished following an RCMP disciplinary hearing Thursday for drunk driving.

Cpl. Darren Baker was ordered Thursday to forfeit 10 days’ pay after he admitted at the hearing to driving under the influence of alcohol in December 2007.

The punishment is the most severe Baker could have received without being fired or demoted.

Still, it could have been a lot worse.

The officer was facing a criminal charge of impaired driving last year after he was pulled over for erratic driving in West Vancouver.

The charge was eventually stayed in January because Crown prosecutors overlooked a request by the defence to provide a key piece of evidence — a videotape of the West Vancouver police cellblock where Baker’s breathalyzer sample was taken.

By the time the mistake was realized, the tape had been recycled.

B.C. Attorney General Wally Oppal said in January he was disappointed by the stayed charges.

The case gained prominence because RCMP headquarters only revealed last October that Baker had been charged with impaired driving, 10 months after the incident. They blamed the delay in disclosure on a communications breakdown.

The case was one of four incidents involving Lower Mainland-area police officers that were revealed last fall.

Appeared Here


North Vancouver Canada Police Officer Darren Baker Receives A Slap On The Wrist For Drunk Driving

February 27, 2009

NORTH VANCOUVER, CANADA – A North Vancouver police officer has been punished following an RCMP disciplinary hearing Thursday for drunk driving.

Cpl. Darren Baker was ordered Thursday to forfeit 10 days’ pay after he admitted at the hearing to driving under the influence of alcohol in December 2007.

The punishment is the most severe Baker could have received without being fired or demoted.

Still, it could have been a lot worse.

The officer was facing a criminal charge of impaired driving last year after he was pulled over for erratic driving in West Vancouver.

The charge was eventually stayed in January because Crown prosecutors overlooked a request by the defence to provide a key piece of evidence — a videotape of the West Vancouver police cellblock where Baker’s breathalyzer sample was taken.

By the time the mistake was realized, the tape had been recycled.

B.C. Attorney General Wally Oppal said in January he was disappointed by the stayed charges.

The case gained prominence because RCMP headquarters only revealed last October that Baker had been charged with impaired driving, 10 months after the incident. They blamed the delay in disclosure on a communications breakdown.

The case was one of four incidents involving Lower Mainland-area police officers that were revealed last fall.

Appeared Here


Canadian Police Won’t Help Search For Missing 14 Year Old Girl

February 20, 2009

CANADA – It has been 18 days since 14-year-old Chelsea Pepin vanished, and nobody is helping her increasingly frantic family find her.

“At what point do they declare her missing?” asks her exhausted father, Ross Pepin. “We have no idea where she is, or even if she’s safe.”

Chelsea’s 20-year-old sister fears the worst after an unsettling conversation a few days before the teen disappeared.

“She told me she had been hanging out and drinking with this guy in his 20s,” Desiree says. “She wouldn’t say much about him, other than he was hanging around with a bunch of kids her age.”

When Desiree pressed her for a name or description of the man, Chelsea clammed up. It was the last time they spoke to each other.

That sliver of information became even more disturbing for Chelsea’s dad after he heard rumours that she had been hanging around with other young teens at West Edmonton Mall.

“We know Nina Courtepatte’s family,” he says, referring to the 13-year-old who was lured from the mall in 2005, taken to a golf course outside the city and then savagely beaten, raped and murdered.

In that case, the accused ringleader was a 20-year-old who hung around with teenagers. Joseph Laboucan, now 23, was convicted of murder but granted a new trial in the case after successfully appealing.

“Anything could have happened in the last two-and-a-half weeks,” Pepin says, choking back emotion.

“But we’re on our own here. Chelsea’s case seems to be one that just falls through the cracks.”

The problem is that it’s not the first time she has disappeared. Since she started at a new school, Kenilworth, in September, her parents have watched her spiral downward from an attentive, studious and fun-loving girl to a defiant, secretive, class-cutting hellion.

The first time, Chelsea disappeared for a couple days but returned home. Last month she went AWOL again, but her parents found her at a house party.

The last time they saw Chelsea was the morning of Monday, Feb. 1, before they left home for work.

“We’ve tried to do everything right,” Pepin says. “We’ve tried to teach our kids responsibility and hard work, but this still happens. She started hanging around with a new group of friends and everything went downhill from there. She started going to parties and drinking.”

Desiree says she and Chelsea were close until last fall.

“As soon as she started at Kenilworth, she became this different person,” Desiree says. “When she went missing, I contacted all her old friends (from her previous school), and they said she had cut them out.”

Every year, about 8,000 people are reported missing to city police. Under a new system introduced in 2008, people taking the calls are trained to sort them into three categories.

In the highest-risk cases, such as child abductions or elderly people with health problems, regular patrol officers begin an immediate search.

Other people deemed legitimately missing and at risk, but not in imminent danger, are sent to the missing persons unit.

But the vast majority, according acting Sgt. Jim Gurney, are ruled not missing.

“And by that we mean, are they out acting of their own free will and it can be shown that they’re making their own decisions, no matter how bad they may be?” he says.

Police will always look for kids under the age of 13, even if they run away on their own, he said.

“With teenagers, it’s based a little more on the individual. If someone has a history of taking off or going missing, then, honestly, it will downplay the risk a little bit.”

Gurney acknowledged that can be frustrating for parents of teens who’ve taken off.

“It doesn’t make anything easier for them, but if circumstances change or new information comes to light, they can always call us again and (the teen) can be listed as missing.”

Appeared Here


Canadian Police Won’t Help Search For Missing 14 Year Old Girl

February 19, 2009

CANADA – It has been 18 days since 14-year-old Chelsea Pepin vanished, and nobody is helping her increasingly frantic family find her.

“At what point do they declare her missing?” asks her exhausted father, Ross Pepin. “We have no idea where she is, or even if she’s safe.”

Chelsea’s 20-year-old sister fears the worst after an unsettling conversation a few days before the teen disappeared.

“She told me she had been hanging out and drinking with this guy in his 20s,” Desiree says. “She wouldn’t say much about him, other than he was hanging around with a bunch of kids her age.”

When Desiree pressed her for a name or description of the man, Chelsea clammed up. It was the last time they spoke to each other.

That sliver of information became even more disturbing for Chelsea’s dad after he heard rumours that she had been hanging around with other young teens at West Edmonton Mall.

“We know Nina Courtepatte’s family,” he says, referring to the 13-year-old who was lured from the mall in 2005, taken to a golf course outside the city and then savagely beaten, raped and murdered.

In that case, the accused ringleader was a 20-year-old who hung around with teenagers. Joseph Laboucan, now 23, was convicted of murder but granted a new trial in the case after successfully appealing.

“Anything could have happened in the last two-and-a-half weeks,” Pepin says, choking back emotion.

“But we’re on our own here. Chelsea’s case seems to be one that just falls through the cracks.”

The problem is that it’s not the first time she has disappeared. Since she started at a new school, Kenilworth, in September, her parents have watched her spiral downward from an attentive, studious and fun-loving girl to a defiant, secretive, class-cutting hellion.

The first time, Chelsea disappeared for a couple days but returned home. Last month she went AWOL again, but her parents found her at a house party.

The last time they saw Chelsea was the morning of Monday, Feb. 1, before they left home for work.

“We’ve tried to do everything right,” Pepin says. “We’ve tried to teach our kids responsibility and hard work, but this still happens. She started hanging around with a new group of friends and everything went downhill from there. She started going to parties and drinking.”

Desiree says she and Chelsea were close until last fall.

“As soon as she started at Kenilworth, she became this different person,” Desiree says. “When she went missing, I contacted all her old friends (from her previous school), and they said she had cut them out.”

Every year, about 8,000 people are reported missing to city police. Under a new system introduced in 2008, people taking the calls are trained to sort them into three categories.

In the highest-risk cases, such as child abductions or elderly people with health problems, regular patrol officers begin an immediate search.

Other people deemed legitimately missing and at risk, but not in imminent danger, are sent to the missing persons unit.

But the vast majority, according acting Sgt. Jim Gurney, are ruled not missing.

“And by that we mean, are they out acting of their own free will and it can be shown that they’re making their own decisions, no matter how bad they may be?” he says.

Police will always look for kids under the age of 13, even if they run away on their own, he said.

“With teenagers, it’s based a little more on the individual. If someone has a history of taking off or going missing, then, honestly, it will downplay the risk a little bit.”

Gurney acknowledged that can be frustrating for parents of teens who’ve taken off.

“It doesn’t make anything easier for them, but if circumstances change or new information comes to light, they can always call us again and (the teen) can be listed as missing.”

Appeared Here


Dumbass Toronto Canada Police Officer Crashes Into Woman’s Home, Killing Her Fish

January 27, 2009

TORONTO, CANADA – A Toronto police cruiser responding to a call crashed into a west-end home earlier tonight.

At 9 p.m. police responding to a report of a robbery on Dundas St. W. swerved to avoid striking a car, climbed a snow bank and plowed into a home at the corner of Jane St. and St. Marks Rd.

The nose of the car crashed into the living room and both officers managed to scramble out of the car.

“The police vehicle is at 45-degree angle pointing to the sky and it’s at least three feet into the house,” said Zenon Barchynsky, who lives across the street. “I haven’t seen a car in a house in a long time.”

A metro ambulance crew examined both officers at the scene. They suffered minor cuts and bruised egos, but did not need to go the hospital.

The crash alarmed neighbours in the area.

“I was watching TV when I heard a giant screech,” said Andrew Young.

He opened the blinds to see the police car had driven into the house across the street.

“It was an almighty crash,” said his father Jonathan. “The police car is half-embedded into the house.”

At last report a 911 caller reported the robbery suspects car was heading south on Runnymede Road from Dundas St. W.

Toronto EMS said no one in the home was hurt, however Barchynsky said the resident’s fish did not survive.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Toronto Canada Police Officer Crashes Into Woman’s Home, Killing Her Fish

January 27, 2009

TORONTO, CANADA – A Toronto police cruiser responding to a call crashed into a west-end home earlier tonight.

At 9 p.m. police responding to a report of a robbery on Dundas St. W. swerved to avoid striking a car, climbed a snow bank and plowed into a home at the corner of Jane St. and St. Marks Rd.

The nose of the car crashed into the living room and both officers managed to scramble out of the car.

“The police vehicle is at 45-degree angle pointing to the sky and it’s at least three feet into the house,” said Zenon Barchynsky, who lives across the street. “I haven’t seen a car in a house in a long time.”

A metro ambulance crew examined both officers at the scene. They suffered minor cuts and bruised egos, but did not need to go the hospital.

The crash alarmed neighbours in the area.

“I was watching TV when I heard a giant screech,” said Andrew Young.

He opened the blinds to see the police car had driven into the house across the street.

“It was an almighty crash,” said his father Jonathan. “The police car is half-embedded into the house.”

At last report a 911 caller reported the robbery suspects car was heading south on Runnymede Road from Dundas St. W.

Toronto EMS said no one in the home was hurt, however Barchynsky said the resident’s fish did not survive.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Toronto Canada Police Officer Parks On Railroad Tracks

January 27, 2009

TORONTO, CANADA – As madcap comedy, one of those smash-’em-up cop farces, a police cruiser parked on the tracks getting slammed by a train might be good for a hardy-har-har action sequence.

In real life, it’s not so funny. It’s colossally stupid.

The best that can be said of what occurred in Toronto late Saturday night is that no one was hurt – except for an officer grazed by a shotgun pellet, this being unrelated to the crunched cruiser.

The vehicle, out of 13 Division in the west end, was mercifully empty of occupants when struck by a passenger train at the level railway crossing on Wallace Ave.

Why the cruiser would have been parked on a crossing – and it had been left there for at least 20 minutes, according to witnesses – has yet to be explained.

“I have no idea why this happened,” says Staff Sgt. Courtney Chambers, of 13 Division. “It could have been a case of bad judgment.”

The cruiser was dragged about 100 metres by the train’s locomotive, big steel on little steel.

VIA Train 1 – The Canadian, en route from Toronto to Vancouver – left Union Station at 10 p.m. with 47 passengers and two engineers up front. Some 30 minutes later, it would have been travelling at relatively slow speed through the urban neighbourhood of The Junction.

“Trains cannot stop on a dime,” points out Catherine Kaloutsky, spokesperson for VIA Rail.

Details will be confirmed when transportation authorities retrieve the train’s “black box” – similar to the data recordings found on a plane – upon its arrival in Vancouver Wednesday. The Canadian was delayed less than an hour at the scene before continuing on its way with the same two engineers in the locomotive.

Police told Kaloutsky the cruiser was only “a little bit on the tracks” when it was struck, but Kaloutsky agreed that was like being “a little bit pregnant.”

How dangerous was this scenario? Last year, there were 214 crossing collisions across Canada, resulting in 26 fatalities and 36 serious injuries.

What was this cruiser’s driver thinking?

Events began when some two dozen police cars responded to a holdup at The Beer Store, around 8 p.m., near Symington Ave. and Dupont St. Two men fled from the scene. A pursuing officer, confronting one of the suspects, was struck in the head by a shotgun pellet – buckshot. He was treated at St. Michael’s Hospital and released.

“The officer is doing fine,” says Staff Sgt. Mark Tilley, of 11 Division. “He was very lucky.”

Both suspects were caught and appeared in court yesterday afternoon, facing a total of 26 charges, including three of attempted murder. Jeron Powell, 32, and Craig Buckle, 29, were remanded to Feb. 11 and Jan. 28, respectively.

Pending an investigation, it’s pointless to speculate why the cruiser was parked on the crossing, says Tilley. “Considering it’s winter, maybe the only clear path would have been on the railway track.”

One suggestion is that the cruiser had stalled there, battery dead due to frigid temperatures.

A witness recounted that another cruiser had just received a cable boost. But there had been no assistance activity around the vehicle that was struck; nobody pushing it out of harm’s way.

Yet another witness told the Star that at the time of the accident, police were interviewing a man – innocent bystander – near the tracks and were examining his ID.

“I heard a train whistle and I thought, that’s weird,” said the witness. “The guy being questioned, he said to the cop, ‘Hey man, give me my ID, there’s a train coming!’ And the cop’s saying, ‘Settle down, settle down.’

“Then all of a sudden everybody’s running and the train hits.”

Appeared Here


Dumbass Toronto Canada Police Officer Crashes Into Woman’s Home, Killing Her Fish

January 27, 2009

TORONTO, CANADA – A Toronto police cruiser responding to a call crashed into a west-end home earlier tonight.

At 9 p.m. police responding to a report of a robbery on Dundas St. W. swerved to avoid striking a car, climbed a snow bank and plowed into a home at the corner of Jane St. and St. Marks Rd.

The nose of the car crashed into the living room and both officers managed to scramble out of the car.

“The police vehicle is at 45-degree angle pointing to the sky and it’s at least three feet into the house,” said Zenon Barchynsky, who lives across the street. “I haven’t seen a car in a house in a long time.”

A metro ambulance crew examined both officers at the scene. They suffered minor cuts and bruised egos, but did not need to go the hospital.

The crash alarmed neighbours in the area.

“I was watching TV when I heard a giant screech,” said Andrew Young.

He opened the blinds to see the police car had driven into the house across the street.

“It was an almighty crash,” said his father Jonathan. “The police car is half-embedded into the house.”

At last report a 911 caller reported the robbery suspects car was heading south on Runnymede Road from Dundas St. W.

Toronto EMS said no one in the home was hurt, however Barchynsky said the resident’s fish did not survive.

Appeared Here


Dumbass Toronto Canada Police Officer Parks On Railroad Tracks

January 27, 2009

TORONTO, CANADA – As madcap comedy, one of those smash-’em-up cop farces, a police cruiser parked on the tracks getting slammed by a train might be good for a hardy-har-har action sequence.

In real life, it’s not so funny. It’s colossally stupid.

The best that can be said of what occurred in Toronto late Saturday night is that no one was hurt – except for an officer grazed by a shotgun pellet, this being unrelated to the crunched cruiser.

The vehicle, out of 13 Division in the west end, was mercifully empty of occupants when struck by a passenger train at the level railway crossing on Wallace Ave.

Why the cruiser would have been parked on a crossing – and it had been left there for at least 20 minutes, according to witnesses – has yet to be explained.

“I have no idea why this happened,” says Staff Sgt. Courtney Chambers, of 13 Division. “It could have been a case of bad judgment.”

The cruiser was dragged about 100 metres by the train’s locomotive, big steel on little steel.

VIA Train 1 – The Canadian, en route from Toronto to Vancouver – left Union Station at 10 p.m. with 47 passengers and two engineers up front. Some 30 minutes later, it would have been travelling at relatively slow speed through the urban neighbourhood of The Junction.

“Trains cannot stop on a dime,” points out Catherine Kaloutsky, spokesperson for VIA Rail.

Details will be confirmed when transportation authorities retrieve the train’s “black box” – similar to the data recordings found on a plane – upon its arrival in Vancouver Wednesday. The Canadian was delayed less than an hour at the scene before continuing on its way with the same two engineers in the locomotive.

Police told Kaloutsky the cruiser was only “a little bit on the tracks” when it was struck, but Kaloutsky agreed that was like being “a little bit pregnant.”

How dangerous was this scenario? Last year, there were 214 crossing collisions across Canada, resulting in 26 fatalities and 36 serious injuries.

What was this cruiser’s driver thinking?

Events began when some two dozen police cars responded to a holdup at The Beer Store, around 8 p.m., near Symington Ave. and Dupont St. Two men fled from the scene. A pursuing officer, confronting one of the suspects, was struck in the head by a shotgun pellet – buckshot. He was treated at St. Michael’s Hospital and released.

“The officer is doing fine,” says Staff Sgt. Mark Tilley, of 11 Division. “He was very lucky.”

Both suspects were caught and appeared in court yesterday afternoon, facing a total of 26 charges, including three of attempted murder. Jeron Powell, 32, and Craig Buckle, 29, were remanded to Feb. 11 and Jan. 28, respectively.

Pending an investigation, it’s pointless to speculate why the cruiser was parked on the crossing, says Tilley. “Considering it’s winter, maybe the only clear path would have been on the railway track.”

One suggestion is that the cruiser had stalled there, battery dead due to frigid temperatures.

A witness recounted that another cruiser had just received a cable boost. But there had been no assistance activity around the vehicle that was struck; nobody pushing it out of harm’s way.

Yet another witness told the Star that at the time of the accident, police were interviewing a man – innocent bystander – near the tracks and were examining his ID.

“I heard a train whistle and I thought, that’s weird,” said the witness. “The guy being questioned, he said to the cop, ‘Hey man, give me my ID, there’s a train coming!’ And the cop’s saying, ‘Settle down, settle down.’

“Then all of a sudden everybody’s running and the train hits.”

Appeared Here