Nutcase Prague Oklahoma High School Principal David Smith Withholds Valedictorian Student’s Diploma For Saying “Hell” In Speech

August 20, 2012

PRAGUE, OKLAHOMA – There’s a bit of diploma drama going on between a local high school and that school’s valedictorian.

David Nootbaar is furious his daughter’s school is keeping her diploma.

He said, “She has worked so hard to stay at the top of her class and this is not right.”

Kaitlin Nootbaar graduated from Prague High School, the Red Devils, in May and was named valedictorian.

When tasked with writing the graduation speech, her dad said she got her inspiration from the movie “Eclipse: The Twilight Saga.”

Nootbaar said, “Her quote was, ‘When she first started school she wanted to be a nurse, then a veterinarian and now that she was getting closer to graduation, people would ask her, what do you want to do and she said how the hell do I know? I’ve changed my mind so many times.’”

He said in the written script she gave to the school she wrote “heck,” but in the moment she said “hell” instead.

Nootbaar said the audience laughed, she finished her speech to warm applause and didn’t know there was a problem.

That was until she went to pick up the real certificate this week.

“We went to the office and asked for the diploma and the principal said, ‘Your diploma is right here but you’re not getting it. Close the door; we have a problem,’” Nootbaar said.

He said the principal told Kaitlin she would have to write an apology letter before he would release the diploma.

A move her dad believes is illegal.

“She earned that diploma. She completed all the state curriculum. In four years she has never made a B. She got straight A’s and had a 4.0 the whole way through.”

Kaitlin starts college in a few days on a full scholarship, making the administrators’ decision even more appalling to her family.

We tried to get the school’s side of the story.

Superintendent Dr. Rick Martin said in a statement, “This matter is confidential and we cannot publicly say anything about it.”

Kaitlin doesn’t plan on writing an apology letter because she doesn’t feel she did anything wrong.

Her family supports that choice.

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Douchebag Union County New Jersey Police Officer Gives Man Who Saved 5 Year Old Son From Falling Down 35 Foot Ledge Two Tickets

May 22, 2012

UNION COUNTY, NEW JERSEY – A New Jersey dad got the scare of his life when his 5-year-old son almost ran off a steep embankment, and though the man saved the boy from falling, he couldn’t stop his Jeep from going over the precipice and into a river below.

The reward for his ordeal? Two traffic tickets from local police.

Frank Roder, a construction worker from the town of Winfield Park, had taken his son, Aidan, down to the Rahway River to feed ducks Thursday. But when he stopped briefly before settling on a parking space, the impatient boy jumped out and took off — straight toward a ledge 35 feet above the river, Roder recalled.

“He hopped out, and I thought that was OK, I was just going to park,” Roder, 38, said, but “he just took off, made a beeline for the edge.”

The panic-stricken father jumped out of the cab of his 2006 Jeep Commander and raced after the errant boy, catching him just feet from the edge.

That’s when Aidan, eyes as big as saucers, looked behind Roder and said, “Um, Daddy …”

Roder turned in time to see the Jeep nosedive down the embankment and land in the muddy water.

Roder hugged the boy and waited as Union County police converged on the scene over the next few hours. A crane pulled the Jeep out, and amazingly, it started right up, though Roder is pretty sure his insurance company will count it as totaled.

He was counting his blessings when a young cop approached him and handed him two tickets. One was for failure to produce the insurance card, which was somewhere in the waterlogged cab. The other was for failing to use his emergency brake.

“I couldn’t believe it,” Roder said. “He said, ‘If you would have taken the five seconds to apply the brake, this never would have happened!’

“I say, ‘Really? And if I did and my boy stepped over the edge and fell instead of the Jeep, then were would I be?’ He says, ‘Jail, for child endangerment.'”

Too awful to contemplate is the fact the Roder almost took his six-week-old son Joel along for the ride.

“At the last minute, I told my wife to take him,” Roder said. “I can’t even think about that.”

Union County Police Chief Daniel Vaniska told FoxNews.com that his officers have some discretion about when and when not to write a ticket. But he said he just didn’t have enough information to second-guess what this officer did.

“It probably could have gone either way,” Vaniska said. “I can’t comment on the discretionary practices of an officer, but certainly, the fellow will have an opportunity to tell his story in court.”

Municipal Court is where Roder might get some sympathy — and maybe forbearance on those tickets, which are for $50 and $60. His date is May 30.

“I don’t care, I’ll pay it,” Roder said. “It’s just the principle. When something like that happens so fast, I could give a rat’s a– about the car.”

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Dickhead Alabama Department Of Transportation Engineer Travis Kilgore Prevents Installation Of Signs For DeKalb County Tornado Shelters After Fight To Keep FEMA From Tearing Them Down

May 8, 2012

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA – Talk about a roadblock.

After waging a lengthy battle with state and federal bureaucrats over the right to have storm shelters, a tornado-stricken county in Alabama is running into another pile of red tape — this time over the road signs directing people to those shelters.

As Fox News previously reported, DeKalb County officials fought last year to prevent the Federal Emergency Management Agency from tearing down tornado shelters that were being built at schools. The county won and was allowed to keep the shelters.

But now the state is stepping in to prevent county schools Superintendent Charles Warren from putting up road signs meant to guide people to the shiny new shelter FEMA built at Plainview High School. That school was devastated last spring by a tornado that roared through during the epic April 27 outbreak, in which 33 people lost their lives in DeKalb County.

Because the proposed road signs would be placed along a state highway, the Alabama Department of Transportation opposed Warren’s request for street signs.

In an email exchange with Warren obtained by Fox News, DOT traffic engineer Travis Kilgore explained the state’s position.

“The use of shelter directional signs have not yet been approved for installation on state roads,” he wrote, adding that “the overuse and overcrowding of signs can be a distraction to motorist (sic) and often lead to a disregard or disrespect of necessary regulatory and roadway warning signs.”

Alabama, it seems, does not consider directions to a tornado shelter “necessary.” The email suggested that signs pointing the way to a shelter might only lead to accidents or an epidemic of disrespect for other road signs.

Kilgore insisted that students who would use the shelter during the day know where it is and that many local citizens nearby the school also know where it is — so no need to put a sign on the state road telling them where to look.

He appeared, however, to concede that clear directions are important, but he didn’t want state roads to be a part of it.

“We understand the importance of notifying and guiding the public to storm shelters, but we cannot permit these signs on state routes,” he wrote.

Warren pleaded with the state DOT to change its mind, pointing out that Highway 35 is a busy route across the northern part of the state. Many people from out of town — who missed all the news reports about the shelter’s construction — might be looking for a place to hide should a tornado suddenly appear, he reasoned.

“Their lives could be saved by knowing where a place of refuge is when a tornado is imminent,” Warren wrote. “We have the signs — two of them — already manufactured and ready for placement.”

Though the signs were already paid for, Warren offered to have them remade at county expense if they didn’t meet state regulations.

“No cost would be associated or passed along to the DOT,” he wrote.

But Kilgore resisted. He wrote back: “I admire your persistence in pursuing the ‘Tornado Shelter’ signs and commend the DeKalb County Schools for constructing the shelter, however, I cannot approve installation of the signs on AL-35.

“The Federal Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices requires States to develop a comprehensive plane (sic) to address miscellaneous guide signs and their installation on State roads. We limit guide signs, other than the primary destinations (Towns and Cities), to those destinations that a large number of motorists may be looking for. Our State Traffic Engineer has determined these signs are not approved for installation on State roads and has previously denied requests for shelter signs in South Alabama.”

Fox News has reached out to the office of Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley, but has not yet received a response.

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