Public Schools In Jackson Mississippi Agree That They Will Stop Handcuffing Children To Poles, Railings, Desks, And Chairs As Punishment

May 26, 2012

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI – Public schools in Jackson, Mississippi, will no longer handcuff students to poles or other objects and will train staff at its alternative school on better methods of discipline.

Mississippi’s second-largest school district agreed Friday to the settlement with the Southern Poverty Law Center, which had sued over the practice of shackling students to a pole at the district’s Capital City Alternative School.

Nationwide, a report from the U.S. Department of Education showed tens of thousands of students, 70 percent of them disabled, were strapped down or physically restrained in school in 2009-10. Advocates for disabled students say restraints are often abused, causing injury and sometimes death.

The Mississippi lawsuit was filed in June 2011 by Jeanette Murry on behalf of her then-16-year-old son, who has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It said staffers routinely restrained students for hours for offenses as minor as dress code violations, forcing them to eat lunch while chained to a stair railing and to shout for help when they needed to go to the bathroom.

The settlement, approved by U.S. District Judge Tom Lee, says all district employees will stop handcuffing students younger than 13, and can only handcuff older students for crimes. In no case will employees shackle a student to a fixed object such as a railing, a pole, a desk or a chair.

“It’s apparent there were severe problems that we hope now are being addressed and will be alleviated,” Lee told lawyers in court Friday, just before signing the settlement order.

Troubles at the alternative school helped spark the proceedings that have jeopardized the accreditation of the entire 30,000-student district.

The suit also reinforces criticism of alternative schools statewide. A 2009 report by the American Civil Liberties Union found that such schools “overemphasized punishment at the expense of remediation.” That report urged that alternative schools focus instead on “intensive services delivered by a well-qualified staff in a highly structured but positive environment,” so that students could return to and succeed at regular schools.

Nationwide, there are no federal standards, although legislation is pending in Congress. The U.S. Department of Education says Mississippi is one of 13 states with no statewide rules governing restraints.

National experts have said seclusion and restraint should only be used in emergencies when there’s a threat of someone getting hurt. But people who aren’t properly trained resort to restraints when students get out of control, they say.

Appeared Here

Advertisements

Douchebag Colwyn Pennsylvania Police Officer Trevor Parham Arrested And Charged After Attacking Unarmed Child With His Taser Weapon – Kid Was Cuffed Behind His Back, Shackled, And Cuffed To A Bench – Latter Texted Another Officer “Got Tased In The Cell LOL”

May 17, 2012

COLWYN, PENNSYLVANIA – A police officer from Colwyn Borough, Delaware County, has been arrested after a tasing incident involving a juvenile a few weeks ago.

The Delaware County District Attorney’s office arrested officer Trevor Parham (right) on charges of simple assault and official oppression after taking a juvenile into custody on April 24th.

Parham put a teenager into a holding cell that night and handcuffed the boy’s hands behind his back. His feet were also shackled and cuffed to the leg of the bench where the boy was sitting.

The affidavit says that when the teen began kicking at the cell, Parham tased him.

Parham admitted to detectives that he also texted a fellow officer saying, “got tased in the cell LOL.”

Parham is now free on $25,000 bond. The investigation is continuing.

Appeared Here


Crazed Milledgeville Georgia Police Arrested And Handcuffed 6 Year Old Girl For Temper Tantrum

April 17, 2012

MILLEDGEVILLE, GEORGIA – Milledgeville police say they handcuffed an elementary school student for safety after she allegedly threw a tantrum.

According to the police report, kindergartner Salecia Johnson is accused of tearing items off the walls and throwing furniture. The report says the girl knocked over a shelf that injured the principal.
She was crying in the principal’s office at Creekside Elementary before police arrived Friday. The report says when the officer tried to calm the child, she resisted and was cuffed.

“Our policy is that any detainee transported to our station in a patrol vehicle is to be handcuffed in the back. There is no age discrimination on that rule,” said Milledgeville Chief of Police Dray Swicord.

They took the child to the police station where she was charged with simple assault and damage to property. Because of her age, she will not have to go to court.

13WMAZ spoke with several other Central Georgia police and sheriff’s departments. None of them could remember handcuffing a child that young. They say the use of handcuffs would be at the officer’s discretion and based on whether the child is a threat to herself or others.

“A 6-year-old in kindergarten. They don’t have no business calling the police and handcuffing my child,” said Earnest Johnson, Salecia’s father.

“Call the police? Is that the first step? Or is there any other kind of intervention that can be taken to help that child?” asked Candace Ruff.

Police say they tried to contact Johnson’s mother but weren’t able to reach her.

Her mother, Constance Ruff. says her daughter was suspended and cannot return to school until August.

“She has mood swings some days, which all of us had mood swings some days. I guess that was just one of her bad days that day,” said Constance Ruff.

“She might have misbehaved, but I don’t think she misbehaved to the point where she should have been handcuffed and taken downtown to the police department,” said her aunt, Candace Ruff.

Appeared Here