Zimmerman Released On Bond, Again, After Shooting And Killing Sanford Florida Druggie In Self Defense

July 6, 2012

SANFORD, FLORIDA – George Zimmerman was released from jail on Friday, one day after a Florida judge set bail at $1 million.

Judge Kenneth R. Lester Jr. found that Zimmerman’s deceit over cash holdings at his first bond hearing in April was not enough to hold him without bail. However, he also said he believed the suspect may have been planning to flee the country to avoid prosecution in the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

Zimmerman had to post 10% of the $1 million — or $100,000 — to meet the requirement for release.

He wore a white dress shirt under a gray suit as he walked out of jail and into a waiting SUV.

“We are confident and comfortable that George will be safe,” Zimmerman’s attorney, Don West, told CNN outside the jail following his client’s release.
Zimmerman out on bond

“We were hoping the bail would be considerably less than what it was. And we will take the judge’s comments to heart, but we don’t necessarily agree with them and we will decide what is next,” he said.

An initial bond of $150,000 was revoked last month after Lester learned that Zimmerman and his wife, Shellie, had failed to disclose more than $150,000 in donations from the public.

The judge’s order Thursday said that the new $1 million bail order was not a punishment but an amount that assured the court that Zimmerman would not abscond.

In his ruling, Lester wrote about the first bond hearing and noted an undisclosed second passport kept in Zimmerman’s safe deposit box.

“Notably, together with the passport, the money only had to be hidden for a short time for him to leave the country if the defendant made a quick decision to flee,” the judge said. “It is entirely reasonable for this court to find that, but for the requirement that he be placed on electronic monitoring, the defendant and his wife would have fled the United States with at least $130,000 of other people’s money.”

Lester wrote the defendant’s plans to flee were “thwarted.”

Zimmerman, 28, is charged with second-degree murder in Martin’s February 26 shooting death. Under Florida law, second-degree murder is a bondable offense.

Speaking to reporters in New Orleans before Zimmerman left jail, Martin’s parents said they are struggling, but have faith all will end well.

“As we said from the beginning, we have strong faith in God,” said Tracy Martin, Trayvon’s father. “And we’ll continue to lean on God and ask Him to give us the strength and continue to give us the faith in the justice system, and justice will prevail.”

Judge Lester imposed new restrictions on Zimmerman that he did not face when he was out on bond the first time.

Zimmerman must report to officials every two days, cannot open or maintain a bank account and cannot be on the property of an airport. He also cannot apply for or obtain a passport.

He must abide by a curfew from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m., and like before, will be monitored electronically.

Zimmerman, a Sanford neighborhood watch volunteer, acknowledged fatally shooting the unarmed Martin after calling police to report a suspicious person. Zimmerman, who is white and Hispanic, said Martin attacked him.

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Zimmerman Passed Lie Detector Test Administered By Sanford Florida Police One Day After Shooting And Killing Attacking Druggie Trayvon Martin In Self Defense

June 26, 2012

SANFORD, FLORIDA – A day after killing Trayvon Martin, George Zimmerman passed a police lie detector test when asked if he confronted the teenager and whether he feared for his life “when you shot the guy,” according to documents released today by Florida prosecutors.

According to a “confidential report” prepared by the Sanford Police Department, Zimmerman, 28, willingly submitted to a computer voice stress analyzer (CVSA) “truth verification” on February 27. Investigators concluded that he “has told substantially the complete truth in regards to this examination.”

Zimmerman, the report noted, “was classified as No Deception Indicated (NDI).”

Along with questions about whether his first name was George and if it was Monday, Zimmerman was asked, “Did you confront the guy you shot?’ He answered, “No.” He was also asked, “Were you in fear for your life, when you shot the guy.” Zimmerman replied, “Yes.”

Before the CVSA test, Zimmerman–who was apparently not accompanied by legal counsel–signed a Sanford Police Department release stating that he was undergoing the examination “voluntarily, without duress, coercion, threat or promise.”

The lie detector test was requested by Chris Serino, a homicide investigator with the Sanford Police Department.

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Sanford Florida Police Officer Rober Shull Suspended Amid Investigation Into Attack On His Ex-Girlfriend

June 5, 2012

SANFORD, FLORIDA – Sanford Police Officer Robert Shull has been placed on administrative leave while the State Attorney’s Office decides whether to file criminal charges against him.

Shull is a longtime SPD officer, who is accused by his ex-girlfriend of throwing her to the floor and threatening her life last November in Volusia County.

The two lived together at the time of the incident, but they no longer live together.

The victim also claims that Shull sent her hundreds of emails in the months after that. However, an incident report by the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office states that the emails appeared to be mutual conversation, rather than threatening.

Shull has not been arrested, as was previously reported. The State Attorney’s Office is reviewing the case to see what if any charges should be filed. The VCSO written report classified the case as battery by touching or striking.

In addition to the possible criminal case, Shull’s behavior is being reviewed by Sanford Police to see if he should keep his job once the criminal investigation is completed.

In a statement, Interim Sanford Police Chief R. Myers said, “When officers take the oath of office, they are committing to a social contract with the community, and must live up to the moral and ethical expectations that accompany that contract. We will balance the rights of an accused to be treated with due process and the constitutional mandate of innocence until proven guilty against the police obligation to hold officers accountable to their sacred oath. If we are to earn and sustain the public’s trust, it must start with how we police ourselves. We owe it to the good men and women who serve with honor everyday to show no tolerance for lawlessness or incompetence.”

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Washington DC Malcolm X Elementary School Declares Dead Druggie Day

May 25, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC – We may never know exactly how or why young Trayvon Martin was killed that dark February night in Sanford, Fla., but the slaying which has provoked nationwide protests has now prompted something even more unique nearly 900 miles away.

In an effort to better educate students and their parents about race relations and social injustice, a D.C. elementary school has declared Friday “Trayvon Martin Day.”

Teachers at Malcolm X Elementary in Southeast are using the unfolding case and the story surrounding Martin as part of their “Let’s Keep Our Children Safe” seminar.

Malcolm X Elementary Principal J. Harrison Coleman says that she hopes the lesson will help reduce the needless violence and bullying in the community.

“The children at Malcolm X know the name Trayvon Martin,” Coleman said. “They know the incident. They know because of what they see in the news and what they experience every day.”

Coleman said that every adult who attended the seminar would receive an Arizona Iced Tea and each student would get a bag of Skittles.

The staff here hopes this day makes the students at Malcolm X understand that someone always cares. Coleman specifically is calling on more parents to volunteer and get involved.

“We want to send a message to stop the bullying and bring about a happy spirit,” Coleman said. “A sense of bonding within the community and within the school.

“I think it’s important for them to understand that life is precious.”

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