For Some Reason Philadelphia Pennsylvania Police Officer William Thrasher Has A Problem With The Blacks Who Have Ruined The City

March 31, 2009

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  A college class assignment may have gotten a Philadelphia police officer into some hot water.

William Thrasher, a white cop in the 22nd District, at 17th and Montgomery, has been put on desk duty after an article written by a Temple University student quoted him describing his disgust for black people in the district where he works, likening them to animals and calling their problems “typical n—- s—,” or “TNS,” during a ride-along with the student Jan. 30.

The article enraged The Guardian Civic League, an organization of black Philadelphia police officers, which is calling for his dismissal.

“[Thrasher] took an oath to protect all people,” said Rochelle Bilal, who heads the group. “If that’s the way he feels about black people, then he needs to be off our streets.”

The police Internal Affairs department is investigating. Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey said that that kind of inflammatory rhetoric will not be tolerated within the department.

“I’m not happy with this at all,” he said. “I take this very, very seriously. It’s not supposed to happen. You can’t serve people you don’t respect.”

Thrasher, 24, of Tacony, joined the force in February 2007, and was assigned to the 22nd District, a mostly black area of North Philadelphia.

The rookie cop made the incendiary remarks as he escorted Shannon McDonald, a senior journalism student, around the district, said Chris Harper, an associate journalism professor who edited the article.

The district is bordered by Montgomery and Lehigh avenues, 10th and 33rd streets.

At one point during the three-hour ride, Thrasher was quoted as saying that people in the neighborhood “don’t care about each other. . . . They’ll shoot each other for drugs, for money, for bull—-. All they care about is their reputation. They want to look tough.”

Thrasher was quoted recounting a homicide that occurred in the area: “These people are f—— disgusting,” he told McDonald. “It’s like they’re animals.”

Later in the article he defended his statements by claiming he isn’t racist.

“I’m not racist,” McDonald quoted him as saying in the article, which appeared on a Web site for Temple’s Multimedia Urban Reporting Lab. “I work with black people every day. They have jobs, they support their families, they’re good people. Most of the people who live in this area are bad people. And they happen to be black.”

Numerous calls to Thrasher’s home went unanswered.

Bilal, a 23-year veteran with the force, said that Thrasher’s comments suggest that he resents the people he is supposed to serve, and Bilal regrets that some officers bring that prejudice to the job.

“It’s the mindset of some of us [police officers] who haven’t been brought up in the city, or around people of color,” she said, referring to her dual identity of being a cop and an African-American.

Police spokesman Lt. Frank Vanore cautioned not to immediately judge the officer.

“We don’t know the validity of this article,” he said. “This is a student journalist. We don’t know how much of what she wrote is true, or who was there. There are a lot of variables.”

Harper said that he reviewed McDonald’s notes and stands by her story.

“I think Shannon and I were both amazed by the statements that were made by the police officer,” Harper said. “They’re clearly racist, they’re disturbing.

“The language [Thrasher used] is disturbing if it comes from anyone, in particular, a police officer,” he added.

Bilal, who grew up in North Philadelphia, near Marshall Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue, said: “I was sick when I read that. I’ve lived in the city for 52 years and they’ve never disgusted me. My family is in North Philadelphia. Not everybody is a criminal.”

Race relations in the city have long been strained, and an incident like the one in which Thrasher is accused doesn’t help, said Chad Lassiter, an adjunct lecturer at the Graduate School of Social Policy and Practice at the University of Pennsylvania.

“We want our police officers to have a moral imperative,” he said. “We don’t want them to display bigotry, discrimination and other forms of prejudice.”

Lassiter said that racism would impede an officer from objectively serving in the community.

“He can arrest and brutalize someone given he’s in the position of authority,” he said. “It’s not true justice.”

He said that if the allegations are true, Thrasher should undergo sensitivity and diversity training.

Meanwhile, Bilal and the civic league will meet tomorrow to decide how to proceed, she said.

“As a police officer, I was ashamed that I have a colleague who describes a group of people the way he did. Disciplinary action is a slap on the hand,” she said.

“They need to tell him to find a new career.” *

Appeared Here

Advertisements

Nutcase Denver County Colorado Deputy Sheriff Alvin Perez Reinstated After Brutal Attack On A Rabbit During A Work Break

March 31, 2009

DENVER, COLORADO  A Denver sheriff’s deputy who pleaded guilty to a charge of animal cruelty for using Mace on a rabbit continues to oversee inmates at the Denver County Jail.

Alvin Perez, 41, was suspended for two months without pay and then was reinstated, said people familiar with the case. The date of his reinstatement was not available Monday.

A criminal complaint says that on May 28, Perez saw a rabbit near where he was standing outside the Denver County Jail during his break.

He got a can of Mace and sprayed the rabbit for no apparent reason.

Perez pleaded guilty to one count of animal cruelty and was sentenced in December to one year of supervised probation, a one-year suspended jail sentence and a $500 fine.

Appeared Here


Boston Massachusetts Police Trigger Bomb Scare Over Mannequin On Kenmore Square

March 31, 2009

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS – The mannequin was found locked to the front door of the Bank of America at at 540 Commonwealth Ave. in Boston.

Kenmore Square is back open to traffic on Tuesday after a mannequin found locked to the front door of a Bank of America sparked a bomb scare.

The incident happened at 540 Commonwealth Ave. Crews were not sure if the mannequin was a bomb, or just a type of protest, so bomb squad members, along with a bomb-diffusing robot, suited up to investigate.

According to reports from the scene, officials did an x-ray on the mannequin, and determined it was not an explosive.

No injuries were reported, and customers were let back into the bank after a brief investigation.

Appeared Here


With Nothing Else To Do, West Allis Wisconsin Police Decide To Advertise Underaged Drinking Parties With Taxpayer Funded Yard Signs

March 31, 2009

WEST ALLIS, WISCONSIN – How do you prevent underage drinking parties? By telling everyone where the parties are taking place.

The West Allis Police Department plans to fight off underage drinking parties by putting up a yard sign where the party is taking place.

Basically, if police hear about a possible party, they’ll call the parents.

If that doesn’t work, then they’ll put up a yard-sign.

Those signs will also go up outside homes where a party is already in progress.

Police tell WestAllisnow.com they expect the program to be a proactive way to prevent tragedies, like car crashes.

Appeared Here


UK Metermaid Does A Lamp Post Pole-Dance While A Co-Worker Ticketed Illegally Parked Car

March 31, 2009

UK – They’re not exactly known for their gaiety whilst on patrol.

But there is one simple pleasure traffic wardens enjoy above everything else.

And for this enforcement officer the writing of yet another fine just had to be celebrated.

Whilst her colleague filled out the necessary paperwork she raised her arms in the air – and danced.

Not content with her mini workout though, the traffic warden then chose to ditch the rumba – for a little pole work.

Overjoyed that her colleague has booked a motorist, this parking officer breaks into a dance

Unaware she was being filmed the woman wrapped herself around the nearest lamp post and continued with her victory dance.

The mobile phone footage was captured by an anonymous bystander who watched the bizarre dance from a high-rise building opposite the car park in Hull, East Yorkshire, last week.

The two-minute film begins with the two traffic wardens approaching a white van parked illegally.

Leaving her colleague to write out the ticket the woman – dressed in full uniform – begins her routine by waving her hands in the air before bobbing up and down.

As if mimicking the hokey-cokey she then skips back towards her colleague before turning once more, this time kicking her legs up and down in the air alternately.

Finally she bobs up and down before the climax of her dance – around the car park lamp post.
The traffic warden dances and gyrates against a lamp post

The traffic warden dances and gyrates against a lamp post

She and her colleague then casually slip away and move on in their hunt to find illegally parked motorists.

Speaking from his home in Hull, the amateur cameraman, who was quick to draw his mobile phone camera as the one-woman street dance broke out, said it looked
as if she was doing a victory dance as her partner wrote out a ticket.

The man, who did not want to be named, said: ‘It was absolutely unbelievable. I was just staring out of the window at work and I spotted the two wardens checking out the white van.

‘Then, as one of them was checking out the van, the other just burst into this ludicrous dance. From where I was standing it definitely looked like she was dancing for
joy.

‘I might be wrong but to me it looked like a victory dance.’

A spokesperson for Hull City Council said: ‘Whilst the video footage does not show a civil enforcement officer placing a penalty charge notice on a vehicle, it does show unacceptable behaviour by another enforcement officer in the vicinity.

‘Our enforcement contractor is undertaking an investigation.

‘Parking enforcement is used as a means to encourage sensible parking and civil enforcement officers do not have any targets to achieve with regard to the issue of penalty charge notices.’

Appeared Here


Dumbass Chicago Illinois Police And Cook County Deputies Let Arrested Man Pass Through Justice System With Loaded Pistol In His Pants

March 31, 2009

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS – In an embarrassing security breach, a man arrested on a drug charge was able to bring a loaded gun into the Cook County Jail complex — and into his bond hearing — before dumping it in a jail laundry room, prosecutors said Monday.

Police officers missed the palm-sized, .380 semiautomatic handgun when Bennie Ellison, 39, was arrested March 18 at 78th and Euclid, authorities said.

Bennie Ellison had a gun tied to the inside of the front of his pants and brought the weapon inside his Cook County Court bond hearing, according to prosecutors.

Ellison, of the 8200 block of South Chappel, had used the drawstring of his shorts to tie the gun so it dangled between his legs, Cook County sheriff’s spokesman Steve Patterson said.

The arresting officers patted him down and missed it. He was patted down again at the 4th District police station — where he spent the night — and again at Central Booking, but no one found the gun, authorities said.

The next day, he was taken to Central Bound Court at the Cook County Criminal Courthouse at 26th and California, where a sheriff’s deputy patted him down.

He then appeared in court — uncuffed — and had his bond set by a judge. He was then taken to the county jail, Patterson said.

Ellison managed to avoid a body scanner and a metal detector en route by slipping out of line and into a different line, Patterson said.

But when he was assigned to a jail division and realized he would have to change his clothes, he ditched the gun in a laundry room, Patterson said.

The gun, which had a bullet loaded in the chamber, was found two days later — March 21 — by a jail inmate who showed it to other inmates, although none of them touched it, prosecutors said.

Investigators traced the gun back to a Texas resident who had sold it another person who, in turn, sold it to Ellison, prosecutors said.

When questioned, Ellison gave a handwritten confession admitting he had the gun when he was arrested and brought before the judge. He also admitted dumping it in the laundry room, prosecutors said.

He told authorities he only kept it because he thought he might receive a low bond and be released soon, Patterson said.

Strip searches in the jail were recently ended after questions were raised in court about their legality. But the incident has led the sheriff’s office to re-examine the new procedures for searching detainees, Patterson said.

“Clearly, there were officers at the jail not doing their job and we’re in the process of taking statements from each one of them about how this could have happened,” Patterson said. “We’re taking this seriously and plan to enact discipline up to and including termination, if necessary.”

Ellison had initially been charged with possession of a controlled substance. He is now also charged with possession of contraband in a penal institution and unlawful use of a weapon by a felon. He had a previous weapons violation on his record, officials said.

He was ordered held in lieu of a $25,000 cash bond.

Chicago Police officials said the incident is under investigation.

Appeared Here


With Nothing Else To Do, West Allis Wisconsin Police Decide To Advertise Underaged Drinking Parties With Taxpayer Funded Yard Signs

March 31, 2009

WEST ALLIS, WISCONSIN – How do you prevent underage drinking parties? By telling everyone where the parties are taking place.

The West Allis Police Department plans to fight off underage drinking parties by putting up a yard sign where the party is taking place.

Basically, if police hear about a possible party, they’ll call the parents.

If that doesn’t work, then they’ll put up a yard-sign.

Those signs will also go up outside homes where a party is already in progress.

Police tell WestAllisnow.com they expect the program to be a proactive way to prevent tragedies, like car crashes.

Appeared Here